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By Nick Madigan | July 1, 2007
CHANCER -- Series 1 -- Acorn Media / $59.99 If there was ever an actor who could accurately be described as "smoldering," Clive Owen would be the one. His low-key manner, resolute and intense, has drawn a flood of attention not only to his work but also to his reputation as a sometimes-thorny performer who occasionally makes wildly unexpected casting choices. Owen, 43, has been around stages and cameras longer than might appear. He played his first role, as the Artful Dodger in a production of Oliver!
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2009
Must-sees Race to Witch Mountain: *** The nonstop sci-fi chase involves child aliens who bring out the combat skills and fatherly virtues of a good-hearted Las Vegas cabbie with useful auto-racing experience (Dwayne Johnson). To ensure the survival of Earth as we know it, this unlikely trio must outmaneuver some grim avengers. Duplicity: *** A pair of high-powered spies (played by Julia Roberts and Clive Owen) can't help testing their powers of deception even after they team up as lovers and partners in a high-stakes masquerade.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 12, 2004
Jude Law has been proclaimed the sexiest man alive as well as Britain's hottest acting export. But his countryman Clive Owen wipes Law off the screen as his antagonist in Closer, the Mike Nichols film that's been packing in audiences who love frank sexual melodrama or can't get enough of Julia Roberts and Natalie Portman talking dirty. Because Owen steals this study of yuppie love and infidelity from his costars, he's been winning the mainstream praise and personal accolades that often translate into Hollywood heat.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | February 27, 2009
Capsules by Michael Sragow unless noted. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button: **** It starts in 1918, when Benjamin Button (Brad Pitt) is born with an old face, dilapidated plumbing and wrinkled skin over an infant body, and ends in 2005, when his true love, Daisy (Cate Blanchett), completes the telling of his story. The movie's emotional completeness leaves you poised between sobbing and applauding - it comes from a full comprehension not just of one man's life, but of the intersection of many lives over the course of the 20th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2004
"It's all been complete media speculation. I don't know where it comes from and why it keeps coming up, because it's never been anything more than just rumor." -- Clive Owen, on reports that he might one day land the job as James Bond
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | September 7, 2007
Shoot 'Em Up is so blatantly geared to be a cult movie that its enlistment of an actual midnight-following would seem almost superfluous. If you've seen the commercials, the act of watching the movie might seem superfluous, too. To approximate the experience, simply record a minute-long TV ad, watch it 86 times, and imagine the profanity, scatology and gore that broadcast censors had to cut out of it. The saving grace in an exuberantly graceless movie...
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 12, 2007
Elizabeth: The Golden Age is one tinny movie. It renders the bloody climax of Queen Elizabeth I's rivalry with her Catholic cousin, Mary, Queen of Scots, and Britain's defeat of the Spanish Armada as an upbeat Protestant passion play. The Virgin Queen of England, Elizabeth (Cate Blanchett), unsullied except for a single kiss from Sir Walter Raleigh (Clive Owen), rallies her country against the rabidly Catholic Philip II of Spain with the help of handsome, glittering armor she might have filched from that Catholic and bitterly anti-British saint, Joan of Arc. Director Shekhar Kapur, who made the leap from Bombay to bombast nine years ago with Elizabeth, continues her crowd-pleasing saga.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 24, 2006
Spike Lee grafts his unique sensibilities onto a pretty conventional bank heist plot with Inside Man. The results are mixed; some of Lee's cinematic tricks seem simply out of place. But look past the occasional slip, and what emerges is a slick, briskly paced tale of bank robbers who think they're at least half-again as smart as everybody else, and maybe are. Lee, working off a screenplay from first-timer Russell Gewirtz, certainly benefits from his continued good standing within Hollywood's acting community.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2009
Must-sees Race to Witch Mountain: *** A nonstop sci-fi chase involves child aliens (AnnaSophia Robb, Alexander Ludwig) who bring out the combat skills and fatherly virtues of a good-hearted Las Vegas cabbie with useful auto-racing experience (Dwayne Johnson). To ensure the survival of Earth as we know it, this unlikely trio must outmaneuver some grim avengers. Two Lovers: *** 1/2 Joaquin Phoenix, Vinessa Shaw and Gwyneth Paltrow throw their bodies and souls into a love triangle that takes place in Brooklyn, N.Y.'s Slavic-Jewish community of Brighton Beach.
FEATURES
By Curtis Morgan and Curtis Morgan,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 20, 1998
When it debuted on the London stage in 1979, "Bent" broke new social ground. It dramatized a Nazi effort to rid the "master race" of yet another undesired group, homosexuals, and raised the pink triangle alongside the yellow star as a symbol of persecution and Holocaust horror.Nearly two decades later, the movie version of "Bent" still resonates but doesn't pack the same gut-wrenching power. The big screen and stagy direction have dulled its edge, but something even more interesting has been at work -- time and changing attitudes.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | February 13, 2009
The International is the rare film that must have had 20/20 foresight. By the time the movie began shooting in September 2007, its director, Tom Tykwer, and its screenwriter, Eric Warren Singer, had targeted a global bank as the ultimate contemporary villain. Its directors hope to manipulate the world by enslaving governments to debt. The film pivots on a rocky Middle Eastern arms deal the bank has been brokering. As Interpol agent Louis Salinger (Clive Owen) and Manhattan prosecutor Eleanor Whitman (Naomi Watts)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 12, 2007
Elizabeth: The Golden Age is one tinny movie. It renders the bloody climax of Queen Elizabeth I's rivalry with her Catholic cousin, Mary, Queen of Scots, and Britain's defeat of the Spanish Armada as an upbeat Protestant passion play. The Virgin Queen of England, Elizabeth (Cate Blanchett), unsullied except for a single kiss from Sir Walter Raleigh (Clive Owen), rallies her country against the rabidly Catholic Philip II of Spain with the help of handsome, glittering armor she might have filched from that Catholic and bitterly anti-British saint, Joan of Arc. Director Shekhar Kapur, who made the leap from Bombay to bombast nine years ago with Elizabeth, continues her crowd-pleasing saga.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | September 7, 2007
Shoot 'Em Up is so blatantly geared to be a cult movie that its enlistment of an actual midnight-following would seem almost superfluous. If you've seen the commercials, the act of watching the movie might seem superfluous, too. To approximate the experience, simply record a minute-long TV ad, watch it 86 times, and imagine the profanity, scatology and gore that broadcast censors had to cut out of it. The saving grace in an exuberantly graceless movie...
NEWS
By Nick Madigan | July 1, 2007
CHANCER -- Series 1 -- Acorn Media / $59.99 If there was ever an actor who could accurately be described as "smoldering," Clive Owen would be the one. His low-key manner, resolute and intense, has drawn a flood of attention not only to his work but also to his reputation as a sometimes-thorny performer who occasionally makes wildly unexpected casting choices. Owen, 43, has been around stages and cameras longer than might appear. He played his first role, as the Artful Dodger in a production of Oliver!
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 24, 2006
Spike Lee grafts his unique sensibilities onto a pretty conventional bank heist plot with Inside Man. The results are mixed; some of Lee's cinematic tricks seem simply out of place. But look past the occasional slip, and what emerges is a slick, briskly paced tale of bank robbers who think they're at least half-again as smart as everybody else, and maybe are. Lee, working off a screenplay from first-timer Russell Gewirtz, certainly benefits from his continued good standing within Hollywood's acting community.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 12, 2004
Jude Law has been proclaimed the sexiest man alive as well as Britain's hottest acting export. But his countryman Clive Owen wipes Law off the screen as his antagonist in Closer, the Mike Nichols film that's been packing in audiences who love frank sexual melodrama or can't get enough of Julia Roberts and Natalie Portman talking dirty. Because Owen steals this study of yuppie love and infidelity from his costars, he's been winning the mainstream praise and personal accolades that often translate into Hollywood heat.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | February 13, 2009
The International is the rare film that must have had 20/20 foresight. By the time the movie began shooting in September 2007, its director, Tom Tykwer, and its screenwriter, Eric Warren Singer, had targeted a global bank as the ultimate contemporary villain. Its directors hope to manipulate the world by enslaving governments to debt. The film pivots on a rocky Middle Eastern arms deal the bank has been brokering. As Interpol agent Louis Salinger (Clive Owen) and Manhattan prosecutor Eleanor Whitman (Naomi Watts)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 3, 2004
How are you supposed to pronounce the title?" is the most intriguing question raised by director Mike Nichols' Closer. Does it refer to looking closer at your lover or closing a deal? I hope the British playwright-screenwriter Patrick Marber primarily intends the second meaning. For romance is a cutthroat transaction in this tale of bed-hopping betrayal among a London-based quartet of alluring, upsetting men and women. Last year's holiday offering about Brits shifting in and out of relationships was Love, Actually.
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