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By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Stephanie Bradshaw Inc., the Baltimore-based design company, is moving into the Clipper Mill area of the city from its current Cockeysville location, which was home to the firm for two years. "I'm excited to bring my business into the city and to be a part of its growing design community," said Stephanie Bradshaw, founder and creative director of the company. The firm includes wedding and event design and planning, interior design and personal styling. "I feel like Baltimore is definitely finding its place," she said.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | December 5, 2013
Plans to turn a long, thin former cotton mill on the Jones Falls into apartments, offices and shopping space moved forward Wednesday, with a City Council committee endorsing a zoning change to enable Terra Nova Ventures' $19 million project on Clipper Mill Road. Terra Nova Ventures would convert the Whitehall Cotton Mill site into 27 apartments, about 25,000 sqare feet of office space, and 20,000 square feet of first-floor shopping, an area roughly twice the size of Belvedere Square.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | December 1, 2009
Part of the Clipper Mill development in North Baltimore will go to a foreclosure auction later this month, including more than two dozen partially built upscale homes - the first setback for a project that has transformed long-vacant factories into a mix of shops, offices and homes. BB&T Bank has foreclosed on unfinished homes and lots in Overlook at Clipper Mill, planned as a community of contemporary two- and three-story houses, as well as on the cavernous Tractor Building, meant to become apartments, offices and parking.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | November 15, 2013
Most Saturday mornings find me inspecting progress as an 1873 cotton duck textile factory makes its $45 million transformation into 84 apartments, offices and two restaurants. Known as Mill No. 1, at 3000 Falls Road, the complex seems to sit astride an invisible line between Hampden and Remington. It's taken nearly two years for this exceptional Jones Falls Valley industrial landmark to take its bows. The first wave of tenants moved in earlier this year; Evergreen Health is the first large commercial tenant.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
Overlook Clipper Mill is a community where groups of duplexes — oddly reminiscent of the 50-year-old TV cartoon show "The Jetsons" — rise up in harmony with the grade of the land on which they have been built. With its primary focus on green and sustainable living, this development in Baltimore's Woodberry neighborhood juxtaposes leading-edge design with Clipper Mill's heritage as a place where the Jones Falls provided waterpower for the operation of grist mills, foundries and textile mills.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | November 23, 1995
Galerie Francoise was scheduled to show the works of Milton Avery and Herman Maril this month. But gallery owner Mary Jo Gordon postponed that exhibit to show the works of four of the gallery's artists burned out in the Sept. 16 Clipper Mill fire: sculptors Allyn Massey, Chris Gavin and Vicki McCarthy, and painter Carolyn Maynard.Instead of proceeds being split between artists and gallery, all money will go to the artists.Massey lost all her sculpture in the fire, but Gordon had in storage two Massey drawings from a recent show -- "Suspended Belief" and "Sling" -- and a sketchbook of other drawings.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2010
In the final years of his life, before he was diagnosed with cancer, metal artisan and designer John Gutierrez would light a bonfire outside his Woodberry studio and use the heat and flames to lure friends and colleagues into conversations that often lasted into the night. He died this year, and those who spent time around that fire are now raising funds to keep the tradition going. They plan to erect a 25-foot chimney atop the fire pit that Gutierrez had built, which will prevent potentially dangerous embers from flying to adjoining buildings within the Clipper Mill complex where Gutierrez had his metal fabrication works.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | September 10, 2005
I HAD BEEN OUT with old friends on that rainy Saturday night in September 10 years ago. It didn't take much to induce sleep after a merry downtown dinner and a couple of drinks. The sound of the phone changed all that. It was Lowell Sunderland, The Sun's night editor, with the news that an old foundry in Woodberry was burning, massively. Could I get over there pronto, and phone in something? I walked outside and heard a distant siren wail, nothing new in a city, but when the noise does not stop, you recognize trouble.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | October 15, 2007
In the 1800s, the area now known as Clipper Mill was one of Baltimore's busiest work sites, an iron foundry and machine shop that produced steam engines, locomotive parts, even cannon balls. In the 1860s, its furnaces melted pig iron to cast 36 columns for the U.S. Capitol. Today, 12 years after an eight-alarm fire nearly destroyed a key building there, the Woodberry property has been reborn as one of Baltimore's trendiest communities, with condominiums, apartments, offices, artisans' studios and a "green" restaurant.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | April 13, 1997
Jo Smail's paintings are pink, but that doesn't mean they are all the same color. Her works depict, for the most part, squares, but that doesn't mean her designs are limited.There are pinks cast with yellow. Cherry blossom pinks. Pinks with a bluish hue. And there are small boxes lined up in slightly uneven rows like bumper-to-bumper cars, or bigger blocks crouched on the canvas, just off-center. The squares nudge each other; sometimes they overlap. They line Smail's studio walls, turning the room into a cocoon spun of pink and white.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Zaleski and For the Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Brewers, the professionals as well as the amateurs that hoist 5-gallon pots atop apartment-oven burners, come in two varieties, according to Ryan Boddy, one of the co-founders of city-based beer club Baltibrew. There are those that brew beer like cooks, finagling with a standard recipe, improvising with each new batch, adding or subtracting ingredients with the seasoned hand of an experienced sous-chef. And there are those that brew beer like scientists, working strictly from a set of instructions and precisely annotating even the minutest deviations in a notebook.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
It might be useful to think of Woodberry Kitchen not as a restaurant but as a theatrical production, and a long-running one at that, still playing to sold-out audiences after six years. Start with the producers. Spike Gjerde opened Woodberry Kitchen in 2007 with his wife, Amy. A third partner, Nelson Carey, is no longer involved with the operation. For Gjerde, who had shown range and flair with his earlier restaurants, Spike & Charlie's, Atlantic and Joy America Cafe, Woodberry Kitchen was a stellar comeback.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
 With her Maltipoo, Brooks, tucked under her arm, Stephanie Bradshaw was ready to get down to business. Three employees were buzzing about her Clipper Mill office, preparing for a bridal photo shoot. Bradshaw rattled off questions about the session, scheduled for later that day at the Four Seasons Baltimore. Nearby lay the props: oversized dominoes and mounds of candies. Just as quickly, her attention turned to an upcoming fashion event she's styling at Towson Town Center.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
What are some easy spring decorating tips? Bring the outside in: Cut your daffodils, hyacinth, forsythia and other early bloomers and make a centerpiece. Buy a bouquet of flowers and divide them into small little bud vases and sprinkle them throughout the home. Get the kids involved: Frame your children's spring pictures. Sub out your art for their framed pictures and create your own spring gallery wall. Switch out your accent pieces: Just like rotating your wardrobe you can do the same with your interior.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Stephanie Bradshaw Inc., the Baltimore-based design company, is moving into the Clipper Mill area of the city from its current Cockeysville location, which was home to the firm for two years. "I'm excited to bring my business into the city and to be a part of its growing design community," said Stephanie Bradshaw, founder and creative director of the company. The firm includes wedding and event design and planning, interior design and personal styling. "I feel like Baltimore is definitely finding its place," she said.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
Daniel Reed's flair for decorating and interior design - especially during the holiday season - is immediately evident at the front door of his very modern duplex in Baltimore's Clipper Mill development. To visit this home is to slip into a winter wonderland; a fantasy in light, color and motion. "Wait until you get inside," said the 44-year-old president of his own design firm. "I love decorating for Christmas. " He doesn't exaggerate. Imagine seeing the most beautifully embellished department store window and being able to walk through the glass and become a part of that other-worldly tableau.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2004
Mildred Ruby, 80, remembers the chickens, sheep, goats and rabbits that used to roam around her 1850s stone house in Woodberry, about three miles from Baltimore's City Hall. She also remembers the three stables that stood in her back yard. Such rusticity was ending in 1959, when a 900-foot antenna tower gave Ruby's community its other name, Television Hill. About that time, construction of the Jones Falls Expressway brought an elevated river of concrete that blocked the view of the industrialized stream valley.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Scott Higham contributed to this article | March 15, 1996
Federal authorities will help Baltimore fire investigators probe major city fires under a new agreement with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms in the wake of a public tiff between the agencies after the Clipper Mill blaze in September.The five-page memorandum of understanding signed this week by the head of the local ATF office, the police commissioner and the fire chief establishes an Arson Response Team and makes it easier for commanders on the scene to ask for federal help.The ATF "does have resources that are available for local use," said Fire Chief Herman Williams Jr. "What this agreement does is set up a framework of notifying [federal agents]
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
Overlook Clipper Mill is a community where groups of duplexes — oddly reminiscent of the 50-year-old TV cartoon show "The Jetsons" — rise up in harmony with the grade of the land on which they have been built. With its primary focus on green and sustainable living, this development in Baltimore's Woodberry neighborhood juxtaposes leading-edge design with Clipper Mill's heritage as a place where the Jones Falls provided waterpower for the operation of grist mills, foundries and textile mills.
EXPLORE
By Benn Ray | July 5, 2011
So that's it, then. No more Superfresh. The grocery store at 1020 W. 41st St. closed its doors July 6 and is awaiting a revamp and takeover by its new owner, Mrs. Greene's Natural Grocery.. The grocery store at 1020 W. 41st St. closed its doors July 6 and is awaiting a revamp and takeover by its new owner, Mrs. Greene's Natural Grocery. Depending on whom you talk to, this is either a welcome change or a very upsetting disruption. I've been unable to get a comment from the new owners about when they'll be opening, what kind of grocery store it will be, and whether the Superfresh employees will be rehired, among other questions.
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