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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | December 21, 1994
The 158-foot topsail schooner Clipper City, which has operated day trips and charters out of Baltimore's Inner Harbor since 1985, is listed for sale in a major magazine followed by yachters.But not to worry, the Clipper City's general manager says. Such ships are always for sale."The only reason we would sell it is if we could turn a tremendous profit doing that," general manager William Blocher said. "We honestly don't want the boat to leave Baltimore, ever."Clipper City Inc. is not aggressively seeking a sale, he said, noting that an eager broker placed the advertisement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | August 21, 2008
When Chad Ellis and his father, Dan, bought a Fells Point corner bar a couple of years ago, they didn't change it much. Instead, they looked back on old-school Baltimore bars for inspiration. "We noticed the old bars were going away, and we wanted to keep the spirit of the old Baltimore pubs," Chad Ellis said. But that's only part of the reason they named it Spirits Tavern. Turns out, this bar was a funeral home during the Civil War, and Ellis thinks some of the spirits stuck around.
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NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Contributing Writer | October 3, 1993
The 14-member crew of the Clipper City sailed out of the Inner Harbor at midnight recently en route to Havre de Grace, where the schooner picked up a group of Harford County senior citizens and took them on a tour of the upper Chesapeake Bay.The majestic topsail ship arrived at the Frank J. Hutchins Memorial Park on the Susquehanna River, where about 140 seniors were waiting at the pier to embark on a three-hour cruise along the quiet shoreline.The Harford County Office on Aging chartered the 158-foot vessel last month for its third annual Senior Sail -- a popular social and recreational event for adults ages 60 and older.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | July 10, 2007
Maybe we'll have to start calling it something else - the Inner Mall, perhaps, or Inner HiddenView. Or maybe we can just go with ironic quotemarks, and call it the Inner "Harbor." It is ironic, after all, that the harbor is becoming an ever-diminishing presence in the Inner Harbor. On the ground, the new retail kiosks that Sun architecture critic Ed Gunts wrote about last week block the view of the water from some vantage points. And, on higher ground, the view from Federal Hill Park similarly has dried up - you can't even see the water any more as the HarborView complex continues to build up and out, making it look like you can walk across its rooftops to those on the Inner Harbor East.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | March 17, 1995
Former Federal Hill brew-pub manager Hugh J. Sisson has raised $2 million to set up and operate a microbrewery in the Baltimore area, possibly in the former National Bohemian beer plant in Canton, Mr. Sisson said yesterday.The newly formed Clipper City Brewing Co. is looking at several potential sites and aims to be making beer by August."My intention is to locate in Baltimore city unless we get a deal that's just too good to walk away from," Mr. Sisson said.Clipper City would join hundreds of U.S. microbreweries producing small-batch suds that are known for passionately loyal customers as much as for higher prices.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | May 7, 2000
I DROVE TO southwestern Baltimore County recently to hear how beer is made on the other side of the world. In the Clipper City Brewing Co., I sat down with Ernesto Lazaro Igot, who told me about the beer-making and beer-drinking practices in the Philippines, his native land. Igot is new to Clipper City, but not to the beer business. He was a top brewer for San Miguel brewery, one of Asia's largest breweries. As a manager of technical services, he supervised beer-making at 13 breweries and two brew pubs.
NEWS
September 8, 1991
The Harford County Office on Aging will sponsor a three-hour "SeniorSail" on the Chesapeake Bay aboard the tall ship Clipper City (at right, at Baltimore's Inner Harbor) at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 24, from the Tidewater Marina, in Havre de Grace.Boarding begins at 10:45 a.m. and advance reservations are required.Box lunches are included in the ticket price of $18 and soft drinks may be purchase aboard ship.The rain date is Sept. 30.Reservation: Barbara Greger, 838-2554.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | July 10, 2007
Maybe we'll have to start calling it something else - the Inner Mall, perhaps, or Inner HiddenView. Or maybe we can just go with ironic quotemarks, and call it the Inner "Harbor." It is ironic, after all, that the harbor is becoming an ever-diminishing presence in the Inner Harbor. On the ground, the new retail kiosks that Sun architecture critic Ed Gunts wrote about last week block the view of the water from some vantage points. And, on higher ground, the view from Federal Hill Park similarly has dried up - you can't even see the water any more as the HarborView complex continues to build up and out, making it look like you can walk across its rooftops to those on the Inner Harbor East.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN REPORTER | May 22, 2007
The owner of Baltimore's tallest tall ship, Clipper City, has filed for bankruptcy protection in U.S. District Court to forestall a federal seizure of the schooner and allow him to continuing operating its public sails and charter trips. Lawyers for Clipper City Tall Ship LLC owner John Kircher and its main creditor, Regal Bancorp Inc. of Owings Mills, confirmed yesterday that there is an outstanding debt of $750,000, and that the monthly mortgage payments are in arrears. Kircher, 59, bought the schooner -- which stands 13 stories above the water line -- and its business operation three years ago for $800,000, he said yesterday.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | July 10, 2007
The bidding began at $150,000. A guy in a blue shirt raised the offer to $160,000. A U.S. marshal warned that the auction was "going once, going twice." And then Regal Bancorp Inc. President and CEO G. Bradley Sanner really upped the ante with a $350,000 bid. Eyebrows raised. The bankers, lawyers and consultants amassed on a Federal Hill sidewalk for the auction of the huge vessel Clipper City were silent. And with that, Regal Bancorp., which holds the deed to the boat, outbid the only other prospective investor at yesterday morning's auction: The man in the blue shirt, who did not want to be named, said he was only willing to pay $200,000.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | July 10, 2007
The bidding began at $150,000. A guy in a blue shirt raised the offer to $160,000. A U.S. marshal warned that the auction was "going once, going twice." And then Regal Bancorp Inc. President and CEO G. Bradley Sanner really upped the ante with a $350,000 bid. Eyebrows raised. The bankers, lawyers and consultants amassed on a Federal Hill sidewalk for the auction of the huge vessel Clipper City were silent. And with that, Regal Bancorp., which holds the deed to the boat, outbid the only other prospective investor at yesterday morning's auction: The man in the blue shirt, who did not want to be named, said he was only willing to pay $200,000.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | July 9, 2007
On some days, John Kircher counted $3,000 in sales. But the expenses of running a 160-foot sailboat out of Baltimore's harbor - with the $9,500 monthly mortgage, the $18,000 weekly payroll, the $26,000 in insurance, the $600 liquor deliveries - became too costly over the years. The first year in business, he said he lost about $220,000. Next, it was about $30,000 - a definite improvement, but still a loss. This year, he said, business was on track for a turnaround. But Kircher, owner of Clipper City Tall Ship LLC, was already too far in debt.
NEWS
June 22, 2007
City police commander's kin admits 3 robberies Elmer H. Warfield, the brother of a city police commander, pleaded guilty in Circuit Court yesterday to robbing three banks in Baltimore. Warfield, 37, was arrested March 19 after a chase through the city's downtown. Police caught him while responding to a 9 a.m. call for a robbery at Carrollton Bank on North Charles street. Police said that $1,308 was stolen, and Elmer Warfield pleaded guilty to robbing that bank yesterday, according to court papers.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN REPORTER | May 22, 2007
The owner of Baltimore's tallest tall ship, Clipper City, has filed for bankruptcy protection in U.S. District Court to forestall a federal seizure of the schooner and allow him to continuing operating its public sails and charter trips. Lawyers for Clipper City Tall Ship LLC owner John Kircher and its main creditor, Regal Bancorp Inc. of Owings Mills, confirmed yesterday that there is an outstanding debt of $750,000, and that the monthly mortgage payments are in arrears. Kircher, 59, bought the schooner -- which stands 13 stories above the water line -- and its business operation three years ago for $800,000, he said yesterday.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | October 21, 2006
I made a bad assumption that I'd have that magnificent view down the harbor forever. I'd often slip away and stand at the end of Warren Avenue, at the eastern-facing edge of the Federal Hill slope and look out over that majestic bend in the Patapsco in the direction of Locust Point and Canton. Maybe a little sailboat or water taxi would skip past.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2004
A year ago, Anton Wade spent much of his time as a little league running back for Madison Recreation's Council, being dazzled by Patterson's All-Metro running back Thomas Smith. "I really looked up to him," said Wade, now a Patterson sophomore. "I thought maybe this year, I could come out and do just as well." In last night's come-from-behind, 30-12 victory over Baltimore City Division I rival City, the 6-foot-2, 180-pound Wade turned in a pretty good imitation of Smith, rushing for the first four Clippers touchdowns, and gaining 124 yards.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | November 28, 1999
GOOD THINGS come in a variety of flavors. This is especially true when you are sipping winter beers, a brewer's traditional way of saying thank you to loyal customers.This year, there are beers for the hop heads, beers for the spiced-ale crowd and some winning winter brews -- hardly anyone calls them Christmas beers anymore -- for those who are content with a richer version of their favorite beer.A panel of tasters -- Hugh Sisson of Clipper City Brewery; Tom Creegan of the Brewer's Art; Tim Hillman, Dave Butcher and Dan Zetlmeisl of Rotunda Wine & Spirits, who organized the event; and myself -- convened at Clipper City Brewery to pick our annual favorites among the crop of winter, or holiday, beers.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2000
Sidney S. Miller, who was a Pride of Baltimore II captain on a voyage through Europe, died Sunday at his Sarasota, Fla., home after gall bladder surgery. He was 72 and had lived on South Hanover Street. He sailed with the Pride from 1989 to 1991, logging 10,000 miles and calling at more than 20 foreign ports. He took the city's schooner through the Caribbean and made a circuit of the Mediterranean as far as Odessa in the former Soviet Union. He also called at English and Dutch ports. "He was a competent mariner and was enthusiastic for Baltimore and Baltimore marine history," said Jan C. Miles, captain of the Pride.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2003
Poly junior Luciano Brunetti sounded like Luciano Pavarotti yesterday as he sang his own praises. The area's top scoring forward in boys soccer scored the Engineers' first goal about 15 minutes into play and assisted on their third in a 3-1 victory over visiting Baltimore City League rival Patterson, raising Poly's record to 13-0 overall and 8-0 league. "The first goal was off the most beautiful cross from Kyle Conrad and - boom - I just placed it in, like I always do, being the top scorer in the state," said Brunetti, surrounded by friends and teammates.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | November 20, 2002
I AM ONE OF those grouches who complain that holiday hoopla starts too early in the season. I make an exception, of course, for drinking holiday beers. Once the clocks have been turned back to standard time and the fridge has been cleared of any lingering Oktoberfest brews, I am in a holiday-beer mood. Last week, I sampled, along with six other tasters, 22 of this season's crop of bottled holiday beers. I pause here for a note on nomenclature. There was an era when the strong brews that appeared at this time of year were called "Christmas beers."
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