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By Anne Whitehouse | September 19, 1993
SLEEPING BEAUTIESSusanna MooreKnopf239 pages. $21In 1969, 13-year-old Clio Lynott, abandoned by her mother, neglected by her father and abused by her stepmother, seeks refuge with her Aunt Emma in Wisteria House, a decaying family mansion set in a dark grove surrounded by downtown Honolulu. Thus begins Susanna Moore's troubling and beautiful new novel, "Sleeping Beauties," whose title seems to refer to the Hawaiian Islands themselves.Clio, like her cousins Mamie and Claire Clarke -- the protagonists of Ms. Moore's last novel, "The Whiteness of Bones" -- belongs to Hawaii's landed gentry, the descendant of "a princess of full Hawaiian blood" and "a shipwrecked Irish sailor."
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
William G. "Bill" Evans, an award-winning Baltimore advertising executive who was the creative force behind the enduring "Charm City" advertising campaign of the early 1970s, died June 20 of cancer at the Hospice of Queen Anne's in Centreville. He was 83. "Bill certainly came out of the 'Mad Men' world. He was one of the first new breed of intellectual advertising writers. And he was definitely a character. There is no question about that. He was a very unique guy and writer," recalled ad executive Allan Charles, who began working with Mr. Evans in the early 1970s.
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NEWS
By Paul Greenberg | January 3, 1991
In the March 5, 1945, issue of Time magazine, Whittaker Chambers wrote a fairy tale to explain what was happening at the Yalta Conference. He described a visit by the assassinated Romanovs of pre-Bolshevik fame with Clio, muse of history, atop the Livadia Palace at Yalta. It is time to bring the cast together again to explore what is happening in Moscow these days:SLOWLY, SLOWLY, like the past returning to an amnesia patient, a family of royal ghosts fluttered down on the heights of the Kremlin, completely at ease, as if this were their home.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
After starting with Cole Porter's classic "Anything Goes," then moving to the hilariously horny puppets of "Avenue Q," Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre closes its diverse 2012 season with "Xanadu," the 1980 film disaster converted into a 2007 Broadway roller disco hit. This summer's productions offered something for every taste, from classic Broadway to weird coming-of-age to the absurdity of a Greek muse turned Australian roller girl banished from...
FEATURES
By Monica Corcoran and Monica Corcoran,Los Angeles Times | December 13, 2007
When Kanye West's mother, Donda, died unexpectedly of complications after cosmetic surgery last month, the media homed in on the troubling history of her doctor and the risks associated with the procedure. The hip-hop star has yet to speak out on his mother's death, and there are many unknowns. But one question that might never be answered is this: How did Kanye West feel when his mother decided to undergo a tummy tuck and breast reduction at age 58? Or did she even tell him beforehand?
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
After starting with Cole Porter's classic "Anything Goes," then moving to the hilariously horny puppets of "Avenue Q," Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre closes its diverse 2012 season with "Xanadu," the 1980 film disaster converted into a 2007 Broadway roller disco hit. This summer's productions offered something for every taste, from classic Broadway to weird coming-of-age to the absurdity of a Greek muse turned Australian roller girl banished from...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
William G. "Bill" Evans, an award-winning Baltimore advertising executive who was the creative force behind the enduring "Charm City" advertising campaign of the early 1970s, died June 20 of cancer at the Hospice of Queen Anne's in Centreville. He was 83. "Bill certainly came out of the 'Mad Men' world. He was one of the first new breed of intellectual advertising writers. And he was definitely a character. There is no question about that. He was a very unique guy and writer," recalled ad executive Allan Charles, who began working with Mr. Evans in the early 1970s.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2011
Fans of Annapolis native and longtime local leading man David Bosley-Reynolds can catch his Olympian performance as Zeus along with his dual role as solid businessman Danny Maguire in Toby's Baltimore Dinner Theatre's area premiere of "Xanadu. " Always charismatic — beginning with the Chesapeake Music Hall, the Annapolis dinner theater that closed in 2004 — Bosley-Reynolds' memorable performances included his nuanced characterization of Jud in "Oklahoma," his Cowardly Lion in "The Wizard of Oz," his Tevye in "Fiddler on the Roof" and his Fred Graham in "Kiss Me Kate" — the final Music Hall performance.
NEWS
November 30, 1990
Roger C. Harvey, 61, an award-winning advertising executive who produced Timex's "Takes a Licking and Keeps on Ticking" series starring John Cameron Swayze, died Sunday of cancer in Plantation, Fla. Harvey also produced television's Bell Telephone Hour, a Sunday night variety show of the 1960s, and won several Clio Awards, the Oscars of the ad industry.Feng Youlan, 94, China's leading contemporary philosopher, died on Monday, the New China News Agency said yesterday. Mr. Feng is best known for his two-volume "History of Chinese Philosophy" and for a series of books that developed his philosophical system, which combined elements of Chinese philosophy, particularly neo-Confucianism, with Western ideas.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 31, 1994
There's nothing anyone needs to add about NBC's decision to run its Roseanne biography on Halloween night. If you're looking for a more fitting Halloween treat, though, check out HBO's new trilogy of "Tales From the Crypt" episodes -- especially the opening installment. Also of note: another time-traveling "Northern Exposure" episode.* "The Nanny" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., Channel 11) -- There's an interesting duo of guest stars on tonight's "The Nanny": Wallace Shawn and Ben Vereen. CBS.* "Dave's World" (8:30 p.m.-9 p.m., Channel 11)
FEATURES
By Monica Corcoran and Monica Corcoran,Los Angeles Times | December 13, 2007
When Kanye West's mother, Donda, died unexpectedly of complications after cosmetic surgery last month, the media homed in on the troubling history of her doctor and the risks associated with the procedure. The hip-hop star has yet to speak out on his mother's death, and there are many unknowns. But one question that might never be answered is this: How did Kanye West feel when his mother decided to undergo a tummy tuck and breast reduction at age 58? Or did she even tell him beforehand?
NEWS
By Anne Whitehouse | September 19, 1993
SLEEPING BEAUTIESSusanna MooreKnopf239 pages. $21In 1969, 13-year-old Clio Lynott, abandoned by her mother, neglected by her father and abused by her stepmother, seeks refuge with her Aunt Emma in Wisteria House, a decaying family mansion set in a dark grove surrounded by downtown Honolulu. Thus begins Susanna Moore's troubling and beautiful new novel, "Sleeping Beauties," whose title seems to refer to the Hawaiian Islands themselves.Clio, like her cousins Mamie and Claire Clarke -- the protagonists of Ms. Moore's last novel, "The Whiteness of Bones" -- belongs to Hawaii's landed gentry, the descendant of "a princess of full Hawaiian blood" and "a shipwrecked Irish sailor."
NEWS
By Paul Greenberg | January 3, 1991
In the March 5, 1945, issue of Time magazine, Whittaker Chambers wrote a fairy tale to explain what was happening at the Yalta Conference. He described a visit by the assassinated Romanovs of pre-Bolshevik fame with Clio, muse of history, atop the Livadia Palace at Yalta. It is time to bring the cast together again to explore what is happening in Moscow these days:SLOWLY, SLOWLY, like the past returning to an amnesia patient, a family of royal ghosts fluttered down on the heights of the Kremlin, completely at ease, as if this were their home.
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | July 31, 1994
It's been a long time, 12 years, to be exact, since we regularly watched that American Tourister gorilla show us just how hard he could hurl our luggage around. The advertising campaign, which was introduced in 1970 and ran till the early '80s, was a Clio Award winner in 1981 and is in the Clio Hall of Fame."The gorilla advertising has always had terrific recognition among consumers," says Frank Steed, American Tourister president.So it's no surprise that, like so many things these days, it's being resurrected, but with a twist.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,STAFF WRITER | September 21, 1993
'Boogie' still hoping for Baltimore dinerThe city that spawned both Boogie and "Diner" will get a Boogie's Diner of its own -- some day -- if Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass has his way.The chairman of Merry-Go-Round Enterprises and would-be National Football League team owner said last week that the main factor inhibiting local expansion is the lack of suitable downtown sites.Harborplace or the Gallery at Harborplace would be attractive locations, but neither has a space big enough to accommodate the multilevel store, he says.
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