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NEWS
January 19, 1993
Bill Clinton's inaugural week began with missiles and bomb hitting Iraq, switching the headlines from his triumphant entry into Washington to a final use of force by President Bush against Saddam Hussein. The question now becomes whether Mr. Clinton will order further attacks after he takes his oath of office tomorrow.This, obviously, was not the way he planned it. The packed schedule of glittering events in Washington, the focus of his campaign on domestic affairs, the exhilaration of a new generation coming to power all pointed to one long celebration comparable to John F. Kennedy's inauguration 32 years ago. Instead, the nation will be casting anxious thoughts toward the Persian Gulf, as it did in 1981, when Ronald Reagan's accession brought the dramatic release of U.S. embassy hostages from Iran.
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NEWS
August 12, 1998
The Providence Journal said in an editorial Monday:WHILE Washington remains transfixed by Monica Lewinsky, the world goes its own way, reminding the president and other U.S. officials of their onerous duty to keep American foreign policy on an even keel.America's foes may be choosing this time to test U.S. resolve, figuring that the Clinton administration is too distracted to be a formidable adversary. But that would be a grave miscalculation.First, we had Iraq's decision to break off cooperation with U.N. weapons inspectors.
NEWS
February 25, 1992
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's endorsement of his fellow Rhodes scholar, Bill Clinton, may nail down a number of Baltimore votes in next Tuesday's Maryland primary, but the key to the election could well lie in the Washington suburbs. That's where one third of the Democratic votes will be cast. That's where politicians who have signed on to the Clinton campaign have good reason to wonder just how the party rank-and-file will vote.To wonder and to worry. Voting patterns in New Hampshire made it pretty clear that the more upscale and suburban a precinct, the more likely it will wind up in the camp of Paul E. Tsongas, currently Mr. Clinton's chief rival for the Democratic presidential nomination.
NEWS
November 5, 1992
To make sure he would remember the overriding issue in the presidential campaign, a Clinton strategist posted the following note on his office wall: "The economy, stupid!" After Mr. Clinton's convincing victory, one of the president-elect's Baltimore supporters said he was thinking of posting another note to measure the new administration's performance. It would contain this pledge Mr. Clinton made to Ebony magazine: "Creating high-wage jobs will be my top priority. I have proposed a national economic strategy for America that will invest more than $50 billion annually over the next four years to put America back to work."
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | November 6, 1992
BILL Clinton will take office with high hopes and good will, but his presidency will stand or fall on whether he fixes the economy. His first task is to sort out the long-term "change" he champions from the short-term economic urgencies.As John Maynard Keynes aptly observed, "In the long run we are all dead." It is the short run where people are losing jobs, homes and hopes. And Mr. Clinton will soon lose his political mandate if recovery is not forthcoming. Mr. Clinton courageously resisted the fashionable (and mistaken)
NEWS
March 22, 1995
Hillary Rodham Clinton's extensive visit to South Asia, which starts Friday, may not look very innovative at first glance. After all, first ladies have traveled abroad before, and Mrs. Clinton is just back from a conference in Copenhagen. Still, her trip to five South Asian countries holds the promise of some valuable dividends, both for the United States and for the countries she's visiting.Many South Asians have what is often called a love-hate relationship with this country. Actually, it's more of an admiration-envy attitude.
NEWS
November 17, 1992
President-elect Clinton and Democratic leaders on Capital Hill are saying all the right things as they prepare for a "new era" in which their party will control both the executive and legislative branches of government. They talk of the end of the "Cold War" between Congress and the White House and try to smooth away the rough edges of contentious issues that have arisen -- often gratuitously -- in the first fortnight after their Nov. 3 election victory.The American people, however, have every right to adopt a "show me" attitude.
NEWS
By Peter Honey, Mark Matthews, Nelson Schwartz, Richard H.P. Sia. and Peter Honey, Mark Matthews, Nelson Schwartz, Richard H.P. Sia.,Washington Bureau | November 6, 1992
In Friday's editions, The Sun incorrectly described attorney John D. Holum, one of several key advisers to President-elect Bill Clinton, as a registered lobbyist with Congress for utilities and railroads. Mr. Holum says he represents utility companies on regulations, litigation and enforcement at the state and local level but is no longer registered as a lobbyist before the Congress.The Sun regrets the error.As he prepares to move to the White House, President-elect Bill Clinton is getting advice from a broad network of people, some of whom may join his administration.
NEWS
By CARL M. CANNON | January 29, 1995
Washington -- President Clinton revealed this week that he believes he has hit on the answer to his problems -- and ours. More talk.Doesn't he feel our pain anymore?"
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | June 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- When President Clinton looked into the camera and told the nation that the message of his missile attack on Baghdad was "Don't Tread on Us," he sent a signal with much broader implications for his presidency.The original line, printed on a Navy flag raised in 1775 by Lt. John Paul Jones, pictured a rattlesnake and read, "Don't Tread on Me." When Jeremy Posner, a speech writer with the National Security Council, brought it in a draft to Mr. Clinton, the president seized on it immediately, officials said.
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