Advertisement
HomeCollectionsClinton
IN THE NEWS

Clinton

NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | November 6, 1992
BILL Clinton will take office with high hopes and good will, but his presidency will stand or fall on whether he fixes the economy. His first task is to sort out the long-term "change" he champions from the short-term economic urgencies.As John Maynard Keynes aptly observed, "In the long run we are all dead." It is the short run where people are losing jobs, homes and hopes. And Mr. Clinton will soon lose his political mandate if recovery is not forthcoming. Mr. Clinton courageously resisted the fashionable (and mistaken)
Advertisement
NEWS
March 22, 1995
Hillary Rodham Clinton's extensive visit to South Asia, which starts Friday, may not look very innovative at first glance. After all, first ladies have traveled abroad before, and Mrs. Clinton is just back from a conference in Copenhagen. Still, her trip to five South Asian countries holds the promise of some valuable dividends, both for the United States and for the countries she's visiting.Many South Asians have what is often called a love-hate relationship with this country. Actually, it's more of an admiration-envy attitude.
NEWS
By Peter Honey, Mark Matthews, Nelson Schwartz, Richard H.P. Sia. and Peter Honey, Mark Matthews, Nelson Schwartz, Richard H.P. Sia.,Washington Bureau | November 6, 1992
In Friday's editions, The Sun incorrectly described attorney John D. Holum, one of several key advisers to President-elect Bill Clinton, as a registered lobbyist with Congress for utilities and railroads. Mr. Holum says he represents utility companies on regulations, litigation and enforcement at the state and local level but is no longer registered as a lobbyist before the Congress.The Sun regrets the error.As he prepares to move to the White House, President-elect Bill Clinton is getting advice from a broad network of people, some of whom may join his administration.
NEWS
By CARL M. CANNON | January 29, 1995
Washington -- President Clinton revealed this week that he believes he has hit on the answer to his problems -- and ours. More talk.Doesn't he feel our pain anymore?"
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | June 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- When President Clinton looked into the camera and told the nation that the message of his missile attack on Baghdad was "Don't Tread on Us," he sent a signal with much broader implications for his presidency.The original line, printed on a Navy flag raised in 1775 by Lt. John Paul Jones, pictured a rattlesnake and read, "Don't Tread on Me." When Jeremy Posner, a speech writer with the National Security Council, brought it in a draft to Mr. Clinton, the president seized on it immediately, officials said.
NEWS
By Frank A. DeFilippo | October 1, 1992
WHEN Gov. Bill Clinton was campaigning in Maryland early last month, the Democratic presidential nominee placed two phone calls to Gov. William Donald Schaefer. The calls were never accepted or returned.When Mr. Schaefer sponsored a fundraiser for the Maryland Democratic Party's coordinated campaign last week, he addressed the importance of electing a strong congressional TC delegation he can work with, but he never mentioned Mr. Clinton or Al Gore.And at a recent news conference, Mr. Schaefer declined to express a preference for president except to say that H. Ross Perot ought to go fly a kite (or whatever Texas billionaires do)
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | September 13, 1993
BILL Clinton has shown he has the greatest gift a politician can own, better than smarts or savvy or steel. He has the gift of luck.For President Clinton, the astounding peace between Israel and the Palestinians is like hitting a zillion-dollar lottery without paying for a ticket.Fourteen years ago on a bright, sunny day on the White House lawn, euphoric Jimmy Carter raised the hands of Israel's Menachem Begin and Egypt's Anwar Sadat in triumph."Let there be no more war between Israelis and Arabs," Sadat said in an ecstatic, empty prophecy.
NEWS
October 30, 1992
At 6 p.m. on Sept. 30, State Department officials went to the Federal Records Center in Suitland, Md., to examine the passport records of Bill Clinton and his mother. In a four-hour search that night and a six-hour search the next day, the officials also studied old diplomatic records from the London and Oslo embassies that they thought might have mentioned Governor Clinton's activities there while a student.Republicans were circulating rumors that young Clinton may have renounced his citizenship.
NEWS
June 22, 2004
BILL CLINTON is a big guy who undertakes everything he does in a big way. Enormously talented yet destructively flawed, the former president's turbulent life so far has been marked by great achievement and behavior that raises serious questions about his judgment. He clawed his way up from a wretched childhood to reach the pinnacle of American power but failed to fulfill his potential, brought down by his huge galaxy of enemies and his own self-indulgence. Memories of the combustible Clinton years in the White House are flooding back as the 42nd president whistle-stops from Oprah Winfrey to Larry King and most every forum in between to hawk the $10 million memoir that will help pay his remaining legal bills.
NEWS
October 11, 1994
Suddenly, things are looking up for President Clinton's foreign policy. After months of bumbling during which his world leadership was questioned at home and abroad, two dramatic triumphs seem to be unfolding in Haiti and Iraq. When these are combined with the quiet success this administration has attained in working for Israeli-Arab peace, staying out of the Balkans and building acceptable relations with Russia and China, Mr. Clinton has grounds for hoping both his record and reputation may be in a turn-around stage.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.