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NEWS
September 1, 1992
In his first visit to Maryland as the Democratic presidential nominee, Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton plans a bit of softball tonight followed tomorrow morning by what his campaign calls a major speech on the economy and education.Mr. Clinton will play ball beginning about 8:20 p.m. at Randazzo Park, formerly known as Upton Park, on Upton Road in Severn. The candidate will join either the Hubbusters, a group of air traffic controllers who work for USAir, or their opponents, the Stingers, a team of Pasadena-area players.
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NEWS
By Sandy Grady | February 10, 1992
Washington -- Until now, the betting line on Bill Clinton was warily upbeat. Would he weather a sex scandal? Almost uniformly, Democratic insiders were saying, "He'll survive unless another shoe drops."That sound you heard was the other shoe dropping.A big one.Just when Clinton seemed to be staggering out from under Gennifer Flowers' kiss-and-tell tabloid tale, he's rattled by charges that he manipulated his way out of Vietnam War duty.The second blow in this one-two punch could be a TKO.Contemporary voters may shrug off a lurid, told-for-pay account of sexual infidelity.
NEWS
January 6, 1998
An excerpt from an Orange County (Calif.) Register editorial that was published on Wednesday:BILL and Hillary Clinton came to Washington with two related messages that would eventually come back to bite them. First, they were ostentatiously disdainful of the era of Ronald Reagan as a decade of indulgence. Second, they boasted that the Clinton era would be one of moral renewal in public life -- implicitly suggesting that the GOP regime they were displacing had been ethically challenged. In contrast, Mr. Clinton vowed, his would be the ''most ethical'' administration in history.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | July 9, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Skeptics may be forgiven if they wonder about President Clinton's motives in his current tour of some of the nation's most poverty-stricken communities.If he is concerned about his legacy -- and those who know him say he is -- then it cannot hurt to be seen showing concern for the deprived in Appalachia, Watts or the Mississippi Delta.But, whatever the reason, the president is using the bully pulpit of the White House to perform a worthwhile service for Americans by calling their attention to the fact that not everyone is sharing in the extraordinary economic boom.
NEWS
April 30, 1992
Pennsylvania effectively closed out the traditional party primary season by putting President Bush over the top to clinch the Republican nomination and giving Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton's Democratic campaign an aura of inevitability. There are still more tests to go, but they will be pro forma.Front-runners Bush and Clinton will therefore try to concentrate on one another as though this is still a two-man race. It isn't. H. Ross Perot, the blunt-talking Texas billionaire who proposes to finance his own independent bid for the presidency is gaining ground with every new opinion poll.
NEWS
October 4, 1991
Win or lose the nomination, Sen. Robert Kerrey of Nebraska and Gov. Bill Clinton of Arkansas set a Democratic theme this week for the 1992 effort to oust George Bush from the White House."
NEWS
June 2, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Irish Times, Dublin, that was published Thursday.WHAT to do after a spell in the White House?President Clinton, at only 54, will be way ahead of retirement age when his term ends in 2001. He had hinted that he and Hillary Clinton might find suitable postings in academia, but that was before independent counsel Kenneth Starr put him through the wringer.Now, he will need to make serious money to pay his legal debts so his options are more limited.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Bill Clinton, with nearly two years left in his term, appears to have shifted his focus away from generating lofty initiatives and onto a more down-to-earth prize: electoral votes.At the White House, signs that a political animal is on the premises are numerous: They are in Mr. Clinton's rhetoric, his body language, his guest list, and in a host of altered positions on core domestic policy issues, including the federal budget.Mr. Clinton's loyalists, his adversaries and independent observers agree that this push into a re-election posture comes in response to the Republican takeover of Congress and the early activity of Republican presidential candidates in Iowa and New Hampshire.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Paul West and Susan Baer and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun Sun staff writer Carl M. Cannon contributed to this article | March 30, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In an extraordinary return on a $1,000 investment, Hillary Rodham Clinton made a profit of $99,537 in less than 10 months from high-risk commodities trading in 1978 and 1979, according to documents released by the White House yesterday.Trading in futures contracts for cattle, soybeans and hogs, Mrs. Clinton entered the commodities market three weeks before her husband, then attorney general and a shoo-in as the state's top executive, was elected governor of Arkansas.She traded through the Springdale, Ark., office of the futures brokerage firm Refco Inc., employing a broker, Robert L. "Red" Bone, who was disciplined by regulators for trading violations both before and after he dealt with Mrs. Clinton.
NEWS
February 11, 2003
On February 9, 2003, LILLIAN I.; beloved wife of Thomas Clinton; devoted mother of Eugene, Leroy and Leonard Clinton, Rosalie Alston and Gloria Walker. Also survived by a host of grandchildren, great-grandchildren, one brother Gilbert Spencer, one sister Carrie Stewart, nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the CHATMAN-HARRIS FUNERAL HOME, 5240 Reisterstown Rd., Tuesday, 4 to 8 P.M. and Wednesday 10 A.M. to 3 P.M. The family will receive friends at Leadenhall Baptist Church, 1021-23 Leadenhall Street, Wednesday 6:30 P.M. Funeral Services will begin 7 P.M. Interment King Memorial Park Thursday 11 A.M.
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