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NEWS
April 30, 1992
Pennsylvania effectively closed out the traditional party primary season by putting President Bush over the top to clinch the Republican nomination and giving Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton's Democratic campaign an aura of inevitability. There are still more tests to go, but they will be pro forma.Front-runners Bush and Clinton will therefore try to concentrate on one another as though this is still a two-man race. It isn't. H. Ross Perot, the blunt-talking Texas billionaire who proposes to finance his own independent bid for the presidency is gaining ground with every new opinion poll.
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NEWS
October 4, 1991
Win or lose the nomination, Sen. Robert Kerrey of Nebraska and Gov. Bill Clinton of Arkansas set a Democratic theme this week for the 1992 effort to oust George Bush from the White House."
NEWS
June 2, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Irish Times, Dublin, that was published Thursday.WHAT to do after a spell in the White House?President Clinton, at only 54, will be way ahead of retirement age when his term ends in 2001. He had hinted that he and Hillary Clinton might find suitable postings in academia, but that was before independent counsel Kenneth Starr put him through the wringer.Now, he will need to make serious money to pay his legal debts so his options are more limited.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Bill Clinton, with nearly two years left in his term, appears to have shifted his focus away from generating lofty initiatives and onto a more down-to-earth prize: electoral votes.At the White House, signs that a political animal is on the premises are numerous: They are in Mr. Clinton's rhetoric, his body language, his guest list, and in a host of altered positions on core domestic policy issues, including the federal budget.Mr. Clinton's loyalists, his adversaries and independent observers agree that this push into a re-election posture comes in response to the Republican takeover of Congress and the early activity of Republican presidential candidates in Iowa and New Hampshire.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Paul West and Susan Baer and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun Sun staff writer Carl M. Cannon contributed to this article | March 30, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In an extraordinary return on a $1,000 investment, Hillary Rodham Clinton made a profit of $99,537 in less than 10 months from high-risk commodities trading in 1978 and 1979, according to documents released by the White House yesterday.Trading in futures contracts for cattle, soybeans and hogs, Mrs. Clinton entered the commodities market three weeks before her husband, then attorney general and a shoo-in as the state's top executive, was elected governor of Arkansas.She traded through the Springdale, Ark., office of the futures brokerage firm Refco Inc., employing a broker, Robert L. "Red" Bone, who was disciplined by regulators for trading violations both before and after he dealt with Mrs. Clinton.
NEWS
February 11, 2003
On February 9, 2003, LILLIAN I.; beloved wife of Thomas Clinton; devoted mother of Eugene, Leroy and Leonard Clinton, Rosalie Alston and Gloria Walker. Also survived by a host of grandchildren, great-grandchildren, one brother Gilbert Spencer, one sister Carrie Stewart, nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the CHATMAN-HARRIS FUNERAL HOME, 5240 Reisterstown Rd., Tuesday, 4 to 8 P.M. and Wednesday 10 A.M. to 3 P.M. The family will receive friends at Leadenhall Baptist Church, 1021-23 Leadenhall Street, Wednesday 6:30 P.M. Funeral Services will begin 7 P.M. Interment King Memorial Park Thursday 11 A.M.
NEWS
January 19, 1993
Bill Clinton's inaugural week began with missiles and bomb hitting Iraq, switching the headlines from his triumphant entry into Washington to a final use of force by President Bush against Saddam Hussein. The question now becomes whether Mr. Clinton will order further attacks after he takes his oath of office tomorrow.This, obviously, was not the way he planned it. The packed schedule of glittering events in Washington, the focus of his campaign on domestic affairs, the exhilaration of a new generation coming to power all pointed to one long celebration comparable to John F. Kennedy's inauguration 32 years ago. Instead, the nation will be casting anxious thoughts toward the Persian Gulf, as it did in 1981, when Ronald Reagan's accession brought the dramatic release of U.S. embassy hostages from Iran.
NEWS
August 12, 1998
The Providence Journal said in an editorial Monday:WHILE Washington remains transfixed by Monica Lewinsky, the world goes its own way, reminding the president and other U.S. officials of their onerous duty to keep American foreign policy on an even keel.America's foes may be choosing this time to test U.S. resolve, figuring that the Clinton administration is too distracted to be a formidable adversary. But that would be a grave miscalculation.First, we had Iraq's decision to break off cooperation with U.N. weapons inspectors.
NEWS
February 25, 1992
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's endorsement of his fellow Rhodes scholar, Bill Clinton, may nail down a number of Baltimore votes in next Tuesday's Maryland primary, but the key to the election could well lie in the Washington suburbs. That's where one third of the Democratic votes will be cast. That's where politicians who have signed on to the Clinton campaign have good reason to wonder just how the party rank-and-file will vote.To wonder and to worry. Voting patterns in New Hampshire made it pretty clear that the more upscale and suburban a precinct, the more likely it will wind up in the camp of Paul E. Tsongas, currently Mr. Clinton's chief rival for the Democratic presidential nomination.
NEWS
November 5, 1992
To make sure he would remember the overriding issue in the presidential campaign, a Clinton strategist posted the following note on his office wall: "The economy, stupid!" After Mr. Clinton's convincing victory, one of the president-elect's Baltimore supporters said he was thinking of posting another note to measure the new administration's performance. It would contain this pledge Mr. Clinton made to Ebony magazine: "Creating high-wage jobs will be my top priority. I have proposed a national economic strategy for America that will invest more than $50 billion annually over the next four years to put America back to work."
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