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NEWS
November 17, 1992
President-elect Clinton and Democratic leaders on Capital Hill are saying all the right things as they prepare for a "new era" in which their party will control both the executive and legislative branches of government. They talk of the end of the "Cold War" between Congress and the White House and try to smooth away the rough edges of contentious issues that have arisen -- often gratuitously -- in the first fortnight after their Nov. 3 election victory.The American people, however, have every right to adopt a "show me" attitude.
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NEWS
October 26, 2004
On October 19, 2004 CLINTON LEEFriends may call the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST INC, 4300 Wabash Avenue on Wednesday after 3 P.M., where family will receive friends on Thursday at 1:30 P.M. See www.marchfh.com
SPORTS
March 22, 1996
President Clinton is scheduled to make his third official trip to Camden Yards on April 1, when he will throw out the first ball for the Orioles' Opening Day, White House spokeswoman Julie Green said yesterday.Clinton, who also did the honors at Opening Day in 1993, was at Camden Yards last year for Cal Ripken's record-breaking 2,131st consecutive game. Next month's visit will be the 13th by a U.S. president to an Orioles game. The team is 5-7 with a president present.Pub Date: 3/22/96
NEWS
November 27, 2006
On November 22, 2006 CLINTON PAINE PITTS; beloved husband of the late Mary Claire Conley Pitts; devoted father of Clinton P. Pitts, Jr., Lloyd P. DeFord, Henry C. Pitts and Jeffrey L. Pitts. Also survived by six grandchildren and five great grandchildren. A Memorial Service will be held at St. James Episcopal Church Monkton on Friday, December 1 at 3:30 p.m. Interment private. In lieu of flowers contributions may be sent to The American Heart Association, Inc., 415 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21201 or to The Masters of The Fox Hound Association Educational Foundation.
NEWS
September 1, 1992
In his first visit to Maryland as the Democratic presidential nominee, Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton plans a bit of softball tonight followed tomorrow morning by what his campaign calls a major speech on the economy and education.Mr. Clinton will play ball beginning about 8:20 p.m. at Randazzo Park, formerly known as Upton Park, on Upton Road in Severn. The candidate will join either the Hubbusters, a group of air traffic controllers who work for USAir, or their opponents, the Stingers, a team of Pasadena-area players.
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | February 10, 1992
Washington -- Until now, the betting line on Bill Clinton was warily upbeat. Would he weather a sex scandal? Almost uniformly, Democratic insiders were saying, "He'll survive unless another shoe drops."That sound you heard was the other shoe dropping.A big one.Just when Clinton seemed to be staggering out from under Gennifer Flowers' kiss-and-tell tabloid tale, he's rattled by charges that he manipulated his way out of Vietnam War duty.The second blow in this one-two punch could be a TKO.Contemporary voters may shrug off a lurid, told-for-pay account of sexual infidelity.
NEWS
January 6, 1998
An excerpt from an Orange County (Calif.) Register editorial that was published on Wednesday:BILL and Hillary Clinton came to Washington with two related messages that would eventually come back to bite them. First, they were ostentatiously disdainful of the era of Ronald Reagan as a decade of indulgence. Second, they boasted that the Clinton era would be one of moral renewal in public life -- implicitly suggesting that the GOP regime they were displacing had been ethically challenged. In contrast, Mr. Clinton vowed, his would be the ''most ethical'' administration in history.
NEWS
April 7, 1993
President Clinton's first big loss on Capitol Hill -- his failure to win prompt Senate passage of his $16.3 billion stimulus bill -- should teach him a lesson. Maybe next time he will be less eager to throw in his lot with pork-barrel partisans only too eager to flatten Republicans with a Democratic steamroller. Maybe next time he will listen more attentively to lawmakers who want him to be the mainstream, deficit-fighting "new kind of Democrat" he once promised to be.It's not that the president wasn't warned.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | July 9, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Skeptics may be forgiven if they wonder about President Clinton's motives in his current tour of some of the nation's most poverty-stricken communities.If he is concerned about his legacy -- and those who know him say he is -- then it cannot hurt to be seen showing concern for the deprived in Appalachia, Watts or the Mississippi Delta.But, whatever the reason, the president is using the bully pulpit of the White House to perform a worthwhile service for Americans by calling their attention to the fact that not everyone is sharing in the extraordinary economic boom.
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