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By DAN RODRICKS | January 16, 1999
Feeling punky, bunky? Bummed out about the state of the republic and the presidency? Already sick of that numbing civics lesson in Washington? There's always this: 294 men and women from 70 countries raising their hands and swearing an oath to be loyal citizens of the United States in a big, grand ceremony in a big, grand chamber in downtown Baltimore. The nation they adopted might be awash in bizarre scandal and polarizing politics, their president might be impeached, but they took the oath anyway.
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NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 29, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Back in the thick of the Clinton era, when scandal investigation seemed to be the town's chief form of recreation, lawyer Michael Chertoff sat by the side of then-Republican Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato, doggedly grilling administration officials about everything from Arkansas real estate to a mysterious suicide, and suggesting the first lady was in the eye of the Whitewater storm. Across town, Brett M. Kavanaugh, a young lawyer and longtime protege of Kenneth Starr, led the Whitewater independent counsel's inquiry into the death of Clinton White House counsel Vincent W. Foster Jr. and later would write much of the Starr report, thong details and all. Viet D. Dinh, another young lawyer and rising star among conservative legal scholars, went from Whitewater investigator to Georgetown University law professor to TV pundit, guiding CNN viewers through the impeachment saga and calling the Lewinsky episode "a case about lies -- lies under oath and lies to the grand jury."
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 8, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Turn on the television, and you might expect to see members of the opposition party denouncing President Clinton. They are not.But Republicans are hardly giving Clinton the benefit of the doubt over his alleged involvement with Monica Lewinsky.As the White House scandal approaches its third week, most prominent Republicans are sticking with a deliberate political calculus: Make sure Clinton stays put -- but keep him wounded."We need to be positive, patriotic and patient," House Speaker Newt Gingrich declared last week at a closed-door meeting of House Republicans.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 5, 2000
GLENSIDE, Pa. - Making his final pre-election stops in the much-contested states of Michigan and Pennsylvania, Texas Gov. George W. Bush offered some of his strongest language yet to argue that he is the presidential candidate who will restore integrity and personal responsibility to the White House. Bush's message was intended to remind voters of President Clinton's scandalous affair with a White House intern, which led to his impeachment. But it also came two days after reports of the Republican nominee's arrest in 1976 for driving under the influence of alcohol that created a distraction his campaign hopes it has put behind him. "Those in public life should stand side by side with parents in promoting values for how we live our lives," Bush said at an early-morning rally of several thousand supporters in Dearborn, Mich.
NEWS
By ARNOLD R. ISAACS and ARNOLD R. ISAACS,Arnold R. Isaacs, now a free-lance writer, was formerly a reporter and editor for The Sun | February 2, 1992
There is a Bill Clinton scandal, all right. The scandal is the conduct of the press. The handling of the Clinton story was a disgrace. It was hypocritical, damaging, and should be an embarrassment to everyone in American journalism."
NEWS
January 28, 1998
OVER THE PAST WEEK, the titillating story of a president in crisis has far outpaced the substantiated facts. What is known is that the Whitewater special prosecutor is investigating allegations that a young woman who worked as an unpaid White House intern had a sexual relationship with President Clinton and was asked to lie about it. This gives rise to legitimate questions, along with sordid speculation.The speculation includes a melange of indiscretions, most of which are unconfirmed. These reports come in an atmosphere in which competition fuels the pressure to advance a story that has moved only incrementally since it broke early last week.
NEWS
January 27, 1998
THE PRINCIPAL IMPRESSION from the controversy swirling around President Clinton and Monica Lewinsky is that the American body politic has taken leave of its senses. Not just Mr. Clinton but all Washington has become the butt of ridicule.War and peace in the Persian Gulf, economic collapse in Asia, reduction of the national debt, pressure for peace in the Middle East, reduction of crime, prosperity at home count for little. What matters to us is -- titter, titter -- what she said and he said and he did or didn't.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1998
Marylanders go to the polls today to choose Democratic and Republican nominees for almost every elective office from the courthouse to the State House in a primary election that is expected to be an important barometer of the mood of the voting public.Despite the large number of races, with as many as 2,442 candidates, only a few are hard-fought. Office-seekers and local analysts fear the lack of attention-grabbing party contests for governor, coupled with fallout from the Clinton scandal, will cause many voters to stay away.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Staff writer David Folkenflik contributed to this article | November 5, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Under freakish conditions, an historic first.For the first time since the Civil War, the president's party gained House seats midway through a second presidential term. Even more remarkably, the Democrats pulled it off in the first election to be held in the shadow of a presidential impeachment.Despite the conventional wisdom that the '98 election wasn't about impeachment -- or anything else -- the Clinton scandal may have played an important, even potentially decisive, role.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 21, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Sensing weakness at the scandal-scarred White House, congressional Republicans are moving to put their own stamp on some of the most important areas in U.S. foreign policy.With the White House focusing on saving President Clinton from impeachment, GOP lawmakers are blocking or trying to change U.S. policy on a number of fronts, including the global financial crisis and North Korea, and have put a harshly critical spotlight on policy toward Russia and Iraq.In the past week:The House balked at granting the president's request for $18 billion to replenish the International Monetary Fund at a time when the world financial crisis deepens.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2000
Linda Tripp gets off scot-free -- in Maryland's judicial system. Won't face 10 years in prison. Doesn't have to worry about a $20,000 fine for her alleged violation of the state's wiretap laws back in December 1997, when she began compiling her tape library of Monica Lewinsky's confidences. But for those of you who think Tripp is lucky -- she was, by the way, the only major figure in the impeachment scandal to face a criminal charge -- consider the sentence doled out, one liner at a time, in the court of public opinion.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 17, 1999
CARTHAGE, Tenn. -- Vice President Al Gore, beginning the delicate process of separating himself from Bill Clinton, formally opened his presidential drive yesterday with a promise to provide "moral leadership" for America."
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Seeking once again to put a year of scandal behind him, President Clinton promised yesterday not to let "any destructive feelings" prevent him from getting back to work on his policy agenda.Clinton said he did not believe his impeachment had hurt the presidency but conceded that it did harm the nation.With French President Jacques Chirac by his side, Clinton faced the press for the first time since December.But the fury of the Monica Lewinsky scandal seemed thoroughly spent -- even in the media.
NEWS
February 14, 1999
When the textbooks of tomorrow are written, the part about Bill Clinton will almost certainly open with that phrase. His legacy will revolve around the tawdry affair with a young White House intern that led him to become only the second president ever tried for impeachable offenses.But what has been the impact of the Clinton scandal on the rest of us? Have the workings of government been affected? What about the press? The law? The American workplace?As events that became a part of our national consciousness start to recede into memory, members of The Sun's Washington bureau take a look at what's left behind and what has changed, now that the impeachment trial is over.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1999
Lots of Americans woke up today like somebody who has just had an aching tooth pulled: They felt a whole lot better, but there was a great big hole left.The 13-month presidential scandal ended yesterday with the two small bangs of acquittal, a whole lot of whimpering from wounded politicians and an almost audible sigh of relief from across the country.Up in Bangor, Maine, Dan Namowitz, a graduate business student and flight instructor, literally breathed a long sigh: "I guess I'm just wondering what the Clinton scandal will be next week."
NEWS
By David Shribman | February 10, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Of all the surprises, of all the unexpected turns, of all the disappointments in the seemingly endless Washington drama, this may be the greatest: There were no heroes in the impeachment and trial of President Clinton.In the 13 months in which the president's personal life dominated U.S. national life, there emerged no great voice of reason, no great figure of integrity, no great moment when the principals rallied to the national interest rather than the special, the personal or the partisan interest.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 28, 1998
WASHINGTON -- With dozens of House races hanging in the balance, the Republican Party is taking dead aim at President Clinton's affair with Monica Lewinsky as part of a final $10 million TV ad blitz.Tuesday's vote has been called the Impeachment Election, and the results are likely to have a direct influence on Clinton's future. Until now, however, neither political party has been eager to address the volatile issue of Clinton's personal behavior squarely in the campaign.That changed last night, when the Republican National Committee began airing new anti-Clinton commercials around the country.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | October 16, 1998
MILWAUKEE -- When this year's congressional campaign began, Republicans eyed freshman Sen. Russell Feingold, a Wisconsin Democrat, as one of the prime targets in their hopes to pick up five Senate seats that would give them the 60 needed for a veto-proof Senate.Until August, however, GOP challenger Rep. Mark Neumann was well behind in early polls. Then came two unrelated developments -- President Clinton's "confession" of sexual misconduct in the White House and a heavy Neumann television campaign, while Mr. Feingold remained off the air.Mr.
TOPIC
By Jay Sweren | February 7, 1999
THEY JUST DON'T get it. Not the radical right. Not the press. Not Tom or Dan or Peter or the other talking heads. And certainly not the political denizens of the talk shows, all of whom are convinced that if you don't follow their brand of logic, you are doomed to eternal damnation in that purgatory of the nonbelievers. They can't figure out why "the people" are indifferent to Bill Clinton or want to see him finish his term despite his personal habits.My life experience tells me that most Americans fall into the category of the great unwashed, somewhere between moderate-conservative and moderate-liberal.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Signe Wilkinson despised the cartoon. The editorial cartoonist drew it in the spring, during the controversy over news leaks in the Monica Lewinsky story, spinning off that theme by picturing reporters chasing Clinton's dog, Buddy. The cartoon warned of "another White House leak" as Buddy relieved himself in the bushes. Wilkinson thought the idea was stupid, hardly befitting her paper, the Philadelphia Daily News.The day the cartoon ran she waited for the critics. Instead, her editors backslapped her and offered more praise than ever.
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