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By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
Del. Casper R. Taylor Jr., a balding, 58-year-old former tavern owner from Western Maryland, just beat Hillary Rodham Clinton to the punch.When the state Senate gave final General Assembly approval to a landmark health care reform bill yesterday -- a full month before Mrs. Clinton's health care task force will conclude its work -- no one was more proud than the Allegany County Democrat.Scores of people inside and outside government played key roles in drafting and ultimately passing a bill that puts Maryland in the forefront of health care reform.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 23, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton and Democratic leaders vowed yesterday to press for congressional approval this summer of the fundamental elements of Mr. Clinton's health care reform program while trying to assure a wary public that it will be a new, improved version.After a tumultuous week of mixed and confused signals, the White House and Clinton lieutenants on Capitol Hill were eager to make clear that they remain dedicated to the goal of expanding health coverage to all Americans, even as they negotiate changes to make the measure more palatable to nervous lawmakers.
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NEWS
February 9, 1994
Sports medicineThe president, in his State of the Union Address, suggested taxing tobacco products to help finance health care reform. It seems he feels smokers should pay extra because their habit leads to increased medical costs.If this is so, then I propose that all sports equipment should carry a heavy tax also.I am sure the records will show that sports injuries lead the list as the cause for hospitalization among all age groups.Let's be fair, Mr. President.William J. KurekBaltimoreTurned offMy wife and I recognize the need and benefits of charitable giving, and we try to help.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The forces of delay appear to be overtaking Congress as Democratic leaders struggle to find a consensus for health care reform legislation this year.President Clinton and other advocates of a swift and sweeping overhaul of one-seventh of the nation's economy have a month or less to turn the tide before the urge to postpone the tough decisions may be too powerful to overcome."Congress meets every year," Sen. Max Baucus, a Montana Democrat who co-sponsored the president's original bill, observed yesterday.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The forces of delay appear to be overtaking Congress as Democratic leaders struggle to find a consensus for health care reform legislation this year.President Clinton and other advocates of a swift and sweeping overhaul of one-seventh of the nation's economy have a month or less to turn the tide before the urge to postpone the tough decisions may be too powerful to overcome."Congress meets every year," Sen. Max Baucus, a Montana Democrat who co-sponsored the president's original bill, observed yesterday.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 22, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Less than a week after his victory on the North American Free Trade Agreement, President Clinton faces another critical challenge in Congress today when the House votes on a bipartisan budget-cutting plan that threatens to strangle Mr. Clinton's domestic agenda for the rest of his term.The president and his congressional allies worked furiously against the deficit-reduction measure through the past weekend and seemed to be making progress in their efforts to defeat it."We're moving, we're moving," said Rep. Bill Richardson, D-N.M.
NEWS
April 12, 1994
Best Care?Jeane Kirkpatrick claims in her March 29 column that American health care is "the best in the world" because of "the incentives of the market system." Neither of these assertions is substantiated in her column.By what objective measure is American health care "the best"? Is it life expectancy? Infant mortality? Satisfaction of Americans with their system? It cannot be any of these because the U.S. ranks poorly in all these categories.Although I agree with her concerns about the bureaucratization of health care under the Clinton plan, I would take exception with her assertion that we presently have a market system.
NEWS
September 23, 1993
Do you have questions about how President Clinton's health reform program will affect you? Call Sundial, the Baltimore Sun's telephone information service, at (410) 783-1800 (268-7736 in Anne Arundel County). After you hear the greeting, punch in the four-digit code 4425 on your touch-tone phone.We'll answer the most interesting questions in this space. Because of the volume of calls, we regret that we cannot answer every question. Keep in mind that details of the Clinton plan are likely to change as Congress works on the proposal.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | September 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Hopeful but wary, Americans are beginning to take a hard look at President Clinton's health care reform plan.They see laudable goals: guaranteed insurance, comprehensive benefits emphasizing prevention and tough controls on health costs now rising faster than family income.Yet polls show that Americans are as skeptical about the president's plan as they are about insurance contracts in general. They know the fine print means more than a salesman's promises. With copies of the plan circulating in advance of Mr. Clinton's scheduled health reform speech today, people are already asking, "Will my family and I really be better off?"
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau Nelson Schwartz and John Fairhall of the Washington Bureau contributed to this article | September 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Maryland members of Congress expressed a wide range of reactions to President Clinton's health care proposal last night -- from warmly embracing its key elements to expressing strong skepticism.Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin of Baltimore, who has worked with the White House on crafting the plan, welcomed its official unveiling."I hope that by the end of 1994 we will have passed the basic plan that provides universal coverage, brings costs under control and deals with the other priorities" outlined by the president last night, he said.
NEWS
April 12, 1994
Best Care?Jeane Kirkpatrick claims in her March 29 column that American health care is "the best in the world" because of "the incentives of the market system." Neither of these assertions is substantiated in her column.By what objective measure is American health care "the best"? Is it life expectancy? Infant mortality? Satisfaction of Americans with their system? It cannot be any of these because the U.S. ranks poorly in all these categories.Although I agree with her concerns about the bureaucratization of health care under the Clinton plan, I would take exception with her assertion that we presently have a market system.
NEWS
February 9, 1994
Sports medicineThe president, in his State of the Union Address, suggested taxing tobacco products to help finance health care reform. It seems he feels smokers should pay extra because their habit leads to increased medical costs.If this is so, then I propose that all sports equipment should carry a heavy tax also.I am sure the records will show that sports injuries lead the list as the cause for hospitalization among all age groups.Let's be fair, Mr. President.William J. KurekBaltimoreTurned offMy wife and I recognize the need and benefits of charitable giving, and we try to help.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 22, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Less than a week after his victory on the North American Free Trade Agreement, President Clinton faces another critical challenge in Congress today when the House votes on a bipartisan budget-cutting plan that threatens to strangle Mr. Clinton's domestic agenda for the rest of his term.The president and his congressional allies worked furiously against the deficit-reduction measure through the past weekend and seemed to be making progress in their efforts to defeat it."We're moving, we're moving," said Rep. Bill Richardson, D-N.M.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,WASHINGTON BUREAUWashington Bureau | October 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- With its formal arrival on Capitol Hill yesterday, President Clinton's health care reform proposal began a months-long struggle for survival against at least five competing alternatives -- each with its own legion of passionate advocates in Congress.The biggest challenge is not expected to come from those who would do nothing or just a little.Instead it would come from a growing centrist coalition that advocates reform almost as sweeping as the president but without the two most controversial elements of his plan: requiring large employers to pay 80 percent of workers' insurance premiums and setting cost limits that critics fear could lead to rationing.
NEWS
October 16, 1993
DETAILS -- Hungry for details about President Clinton's health care plan, House lawmakers grilled administration officials yesterday on the proposal's financing but came up mostly empty-handed.White House officials testifying during a House Ways and Means health subcommittee hearing were unable to give definitive answers to such questions as how high the expected tax hike on cigarettes would be, whether a tax hike on alcoholic beverages is off the table, and how much money the nation would save once many Americans begin paying part of their insurance premiums themselves.
NEWS
September 23, 1993
Do you have questions about how President Clinton's health reform program will affect you? Call Sundial, the Baltimore Sun's telephone information service, at (410) 783-1800 (268-7736 in Anne Arundel County). After you hear the greeting, punch in the four-digit code 4425 on your touch-tone phone.We'll answer the most interesting questions in this space. Because of the volume of calls, we regret that we cannot answer every question. Keep in mind that details of the Clinton plan are likely to change as Congress works on the proposal.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | August 17, 1993
TULSA, Okla. -- Republicans attending the annual conference of the National Governors' Association are sending unmistakable signals that they intend to resist key elements of President Clinton's health care reform program. Moreover, they are convinced they hold the political high ground.And the fact that they are probably right about the politics of the issue speaks volumes about both the president and the electorate now.Such prominent governors as Pete Wilson of California and Carroll Campbell of South Carolina, the new NGA chairman, are saying they would oppose any plan mandating universal coverage that would oblige small business to provide health insurance.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 23, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton and Democratic leaders vowed yesterday to press for congressional approval this summer of the fundamental elements of Mr. Clinton's health care reform program while trying to assure a wary public that it will be a new, improved version.After a tumultuous week of mixed and confused signals, the White House and Clinton lieutenants on Capitol Hill were eager to make clear that they remain dedicated to the goal of expanding health coverage to all Americans, even as they negotiate changes to make the measure more palatable to nervous lawmakers.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau Nelson Schwartz and John Fairhall of the Washington Bureau contributed to this article | September 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Maryland members of Congress expressed a wide range of reactions to President Clinton's health care proposal last night -- from warmly embracing its key elements to expressing strong skepticism.Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin of Baltimore, who has worked with the White House on crafting the plan, welcomed its official unveiling."I hope that by the end of 1994 we will have passed the basic plan that provides universal coverage, brings costs under control and deals with the other priorities" outlined by the president last night, he said.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | September 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Hopeful but wary, Americans are beginning to take a hard look at President Clinton's health care reform plan.They see laudable goals: guaranteed insurance, comprehensive benefits emphasizing prevention and tough controls on health costs now rising faster than family income.Yet polls show that Americans are as skeptical about the president's plan as they are about insurance contracts in general. They know the fine print means more than a salesman's promises. With copies of the plan circulating in advance of Mr. Clinton's scheduled health reform speech today, people are already asking, "Will my family and I really be better off?"
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