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NEWS
August 3, 2014
Thank you to William L. Jacobsen Jr. for his commentary in The Baltimore Sun ( "President Hillary Clinton," July 31). As a woman reader of The Sun, I'm feeling as though this commentary is the first draft for one to be written on Wednesday, November 9, 2016. I'm also feeling that the same lingo about President Barack Obama will be a tagline for Ms. Clinton. If we didn't want Barack Obama to become president of the United States we are racist. If we don't want Hilary Clinton to be president of the United States we are misogynists.
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NEWS
August 3, 2014
Thank you to William L. Jacobsen Jr. for his commentary in The Baltimore Sun ( "President Hillary Clinton," July 31). As a woman reader of The Sun, I'm feeling as though this commentary is the first draft for one to be written on Wednesday, November 9, 2016. I'm also feeling that the same lingo about President Barack Obama will be a tagline for Ms. Clinton. If we didn't want Barack Obama to become president of the United States we are racist. If we don't want Hilary Clinton to be president of the United States we are misogynists.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL NELSON | November 8, 1992
President-elect Bill Clinton would like nothing better than t be a president of achievement in the mold of Woodrow Wilson, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Lyndon B. Johnson and Ronald Reagan. But he probably is fated (at least dur- ing his first term) to be a president of preparation like Theodore Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy or Jimmy Carter.What marks a presidency of achievement? According to the theory developed by Vanderbilt University political scientist Erwin C. Hargrove and me in our 1984 book, "Presidents, Politics, and Policy," such a presidency is characterized by a great burst of presidentially inspired legislation that significantly alters the role of federal government in American society.
NEWS
January 8, 2013
Voters are smart enough to see through the GOP smoke screen. Boo Hoo Bob, former Gov. Robert Ehrlich's weekly whine fest about how no one seems to love conservatives, hit a new low this week ("For Republicans, a not so happy New Year," Jan. 6). His advice? Take more Fox News and send a check to the Heritage Foundation. Conservatives lost not, as Mitt Romney said, because people want "free stuff," but because people are smart enough to see through the Republican smoke screen. On the GOP's signature issue, lower taxes, Americans have seen that what Republicans say simply isn't true.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 21, 2000
WASHINGTON - On paper, the most visible achievement of the $52 million Whitewater investigation that ended quietly yesterday was the 12 convictions of assorted Arkansas figures racked up by prosecutors over the years. But the investigation, which began more than six years ago with a look at an Arkansas land deal and grew to be the most expensive and wide-ranging government inquiry in U.S. history, appears to have left its stamp on everything from the Clinton presidency to public sentiment about government.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 29, 1996
CHICAGO -- In the third week of January 1995, President Clinton summoned several Cabinet-level officials to an emergency Oval Office meeting on the deteriorating economic crisis in Mexico.It was like no other meeting in the Clinton White House, and to one participant, the swift decisiveness of the president that day foreshadowed a reversal in the fortunes of the then-reeling Clinton presidency.Tonight, when Clinton addresses the Democratic National Convention, his approval rating will be above 50 percent, and his lead over Republican Bob Dole will be at least nine to 12 points.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 5, 1997
Whoever said phonics and whole language are mutually exclusive was all theory and no practice.Make no threat you don't keep. Do what you said you would. Don't call intolerable what you do tolerate. Isolate Iraq, not the U.S.Fast track is really slow. The alternative is no track.It just won't seem like the Clinton presidency without Senate hearings.Pub Date: 11/05/97
NEWS
By Don Aucoin and Don Aucoin,BOSTON GLOBE | November 24, 1996
The sunstruck hordes staggering through Disney World might be surprised to learn of the ruthless corporate culture lurking behind Mickey and Goofy.That culture is the setting of a piece in the December Vanity Fair about the slow-motion humiliation of erstwhile Hollywood super-agent Michael Ovitz, who has struggled to stay afloat as president of Walt Disney Co.Plainly, the long knives are out for Ovitz. Just look at the number of Disney executives eager to tell co-authors Bryan Burrough and Kim Masters about Ovitz's misguided projects, petty power trips (employing half a dozen secretaries, keeping limo drivers on call even when he wasn't going anywhere)
NEWS
May 25, 1993
How do non-Americans view this nation's new president after the first 100-plus days in office?Here's one point of view from England as expressed in The Guardian of London:"Politics is a cruel, groveling and interconnected profession. And politics has rapidly rubbed the sheen from the Clinton presidency. He is poised to resume nuclear testing: though he swore, running for office, that he would not. He was poised to take the Bosnian initiative: but now he has crept to the back of the stage -- and the word is that the Europeans once again have the 'lead role.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | January 23, 1994
Whatever was happening to Bill Clinton's presidency through the first week in January did not matter to the rest of the world. Mr. Clinton had no great reputation out there. The world view of him was still, largely, what have those crazy Americans done this time?So it hardly mattered that twin scandals were eating away at the Clinton presidency. That just added to the quaint American charm of it.The difference between the first week in January and now is that, between, Bill Clinton became the leader of the world.
NEWS
December 14, 2012
As a business executive, I found so many errors in author and novelist E Dee Monnen's column on the effect of higher taxes that it is difficult to know where to begin ("How taxing the rich hurts all of us," Dec. 12). First, while corporate tax rates in the U.S. are relatively high, at 35 percent, corporations have so many shelters and loopholes that the actual rates paid are only about 18 percent - lower than in most other industrial nations. Second, there is no evidence that millionaires have left the state "in droves," as she claims.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 4, 2012
The Obama re-election team must be in panic mode. The president is stuck in a virtual tie with Mitt Romney in some polls and behind him in others, so in desperation it has reached out to the Big Dog, Bill Clinton, for help. Mr. Clinton will speak next month at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., in a Wednesday night position often reserved for the vice presidential nominee. Presidents Obama and Clinton have not had the most cordial relationship, but when you're drowning, your feelings about the lifeguard matter less than his ability to keep you afloat.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 28, 2011
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has famously declared that she wants her next job title to be "grandmother. " But a Harris Poll indicates that Mrs. Clinton is just about the only politician with a job approval rating above sea level. And a second survey suggests that American moms - remember the role of the soccer mom in 1996? - would rather vote for her for president than Barack Obama or any of the Republican candidates. It might be time to change the date on those "Hillary 2008" buttons.
NEWS
By Peter Nicholas and Noam N. Levey and Peter Nicholas and Noam N. Levey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 20, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Federal archivists released yesterday 11,000 pages of schedules from Hillary Clinton's time as first lady, but the material offers little to support her assertion that her White House experience left her best prepared to become president. The records show her to be an active first lady who traveled widely and was deeply involved in health care policy, but they are rife with omissions, terse references and redaction that obscure many of her activities and the identities of those she saw. For months, the New York senator has faced calls to speed the release of about 2 million pages of material covering her eight years as first lady.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | June 28, 2004
ATLANTA - Bill Clinton hopes to be acquitted by history. Fortunately for him, though, no subject of history is ever around to hear its verdict. Scholars will probably wonder what drove legions of conservatives to hate Mr. Clinton with such fury that they wasted years and spent a king's ransom trying to drive him from office. They will no doubt note that Mr. Clinton accomplished much despite the "vast right-wing conspiracy": He righted the nation's finances after decades of dangerous deficits.
NEWS
June 22, 2004
BILL CLINTON is a big guy who undertakes everything he does in a big way. Enormously talented yet destructively flawed, the former president's turbulent life so far has been marked by great achievement and behavior that raises serious questions about his judgment. He clawed his way up from a wretched childhood to reach the pinnacle of American power but failed to fulfill his potential, brought down by his huge galaxy of enemies and his own self-indulgence. Memories of the combustible Clinton years in the White House are flooding back as the 42nd president whistle-stops from Oprah Winfrey to Larry King and most every forum in between to hawk the $10 million memoir that will help pay his remaining legal bills.
NEWS
By George F. Will | November 7, 1996
PURSING ITS LIPS austerely, the electorate saw its duty and did it pitilessly. Feeling inclined to extend the Clinton presidency, it did so in a deflating manner, making him a lame duck on a short leash held by a Congress that probably will be controlled by Republicans for the rest of his tenure. His post-election smile could be construed as an inverted grimace.Voters gave Bill Clinton what history says is a recipe for disappointment -- a second term. And they allowed Republicans to retain control of the engine of government in this era of restored congressional supremacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Sun Staff | May 25, 2003
The Clinton Wars, by Sidney Blumenthal. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 822 pages. $30 Former White House aide Sidney Blumenthal may have written this expansive account of the turbulent Clinton years in part to cover the $300,000 in legal bills he incurred as a result of his close counsel to the president and first lady and his knack for drawing fire. But more than anything, Blumenthal's review of the Clinton presidency feels like a book he had to write (and had to write at this indulgent length)
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 18, 2001
WASHINGTON - Ever since Franklin D. Roosevelt began his presidency with a rush of legislative proposals in 1933, a yardstick of presidential vigor, if not accomplishment, has been a new leader's initiatives and record in his first 100 days in office. Three later Democratic presidents - John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson and Bill Clinton - all sought to evoke the same image of a new administration rushing pell-mell out of the starting gate to bring about change. So did two subsequent Republican leaders - President Ronald Reagan, with his talk about "draining the swamp" of big government in Washington, and House Speaker Newt Gingrich, with his "Contract with America" aimed at doing much the same.
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