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By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | April 2, 1994
COMMERCE, Calif. -- The Easter recess is a traditional time for members of Congress to come home and find out what's on the minds of their constituents. In Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard's 33rd Congressional District, a near-in suburb of Los Angeles, what induced more than 100 constituents to turn out at 7:30 the other morning was something more real and immediate to them than Whitewater: how the Clinton health care plan would affect them and their community.Roybal-Allard is a first-term Democrat representing a district in which Hispanic-Americans make up 83 percent of the population.
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NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and John Fritze and Stephen Kiehl and John Fritze,SUN REPORTERS | February 11, 2008
BOWIE -- Appearing before thousands of enthusiastic supporters at Bowie State University last night, Sen. Hillary Clinton stressed her proposals for the economy and health care in a final burst of campaigning before tomorrow's Maryland primary. At another appearance earlier in the day at a Manassas, Va., middle school, she stressed her national security credentials, weaving together policy proposals with criticism of Sen. Barack Obama. "People say, why don't you come and give us one of those great rhetorical flourishes and get everybody whipped up," Clinton said at the Manassas rally, in a not-so-subtle reference to Obama's soaring oratory.
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NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Sun Staff Writer | March 1, 1994
Stay tuned -- the Clinton health care plan will change greatly as it moves through Congress, co-sponsoring U.S. Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin told a group of small business owners in Odenton yesterday.And it may become more palatable to small businesses.The 3rd District Democrat told members of the West Anne Arundel County Chamber of Commerce that mandatory employer participation, a feature that offends small businesses, may be deferred for several years.That delay, along with malpractice reform and other reforms, will give market forces time to address the current health care system's shortcomings while keeping its best features, he said.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 19, 1999
WASHINGTON -- At an ice-breaking budget summit today, President Clinton and congressional leaders are expected to begin to try to figure out how to repair the damage they did two years ago to Medicare.As part of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, changes in the popular health care program for the elderly and disabled slashed Medicare spending almost twice as deeply as anticipated -- producing $200 billion over five years and much of what is now projected as the federal budget surplus.The squeeze is being felt throughout the health care system -- from hospitals to doctors, nursing homes, home health care agencies, managed-care insurance plans and manufacturers of medical equipment.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | October 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Signaling trouble for a key part of President Clinton's health care reform plan, Democratic senators expressed strong doubts yesterday about "health alliances," the new organizations that would negotiate health coverage for consumers.Members of the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee said they feared the alliances would become monopolistic bureaucracies that stifle competition. "I think the American consumer is going to get the short end of the deal," warned Sen. Howard M. Metzenbaum, an Ohio Democrat who advocates health coverage for all Americans.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | October 5, 1993
Anne Arundel Health Department officials briefed the County Council last night on its possible role if the Clinton health care reform plan is approved and provided an update on the numbers of AIDS cases in its biannual report.County Health Officer Frances B. Phillips told the council that some services the department now provides will not be offered if the Clinton plan is approved "because every county resident would be fully insured and get these services in a private clinic."Those services include well-baby clinics, family planning, pregnancy services, preventive dental treatment, immunizations and outpatient mental health and addictions treatment.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and Karen Hosler and John Fairhall and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 9, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In the latest blow to President Clinton's health reform proposal, a nonpartisan congressional agency reported yesterday that the plan would produce a new, deficit-boosting government program -- not the private, less costly system promised by the White House.The Congressional Budget Office analysis, coming on the heels of damaging criticism of the president's plan last week from leading business groups, increases pressure on the administration to scale back its plan.White House officials had predicted that the CBO would treat the president's plan as nongovernmental, and thus not part of the federal budget.
NEWS
By Robert Pear and David E. Rosenbaum and Robert Pear and David E. Rosenbaum,New York Times News Service | April 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Just one month before President Clinton is scheduled to send Congress an ambitious proposal to guarantee comprehensive health care for all Americans, administration officials are beginning to realize that it may involve huge costs and tax increases bigger than any previously proposed.The White House has spent 12 weeks developing ideas for guaranteeing all Americans a rich package of health benefits. But only recently has the task force begun to focus on the costs.Mr. Clinton would probably finance his health plan by asking Congress to impose new taxes, amounting to hundreds of dollars a year even for middle-income families, including millions who already get health insurance coverage through their employers.
NEWS
January 26, 1994
"I think it was an extraordinary commitment for the president to draw the line as clearly and as hard as he did about coverage for everybody."-- Ron Pollack, executive director of Families USA, an advocacy group supporting the Clinton health care reform plan"I think it is unfortunate he chose to imply that the insurance industry is somehow running the health care system. Clearly we're a player in the system, but he overstated our role."-- Chip Kahn, executive vice president of the Health Insurance Association of America, responding to Mr. Clinton's criticism of the insurance industry.
NEWS
September 23, 1993
It's big, it's bold and it's already being called the most lobbied bill in history.Bill Clinton put his presidency on the line last night with a health care reform proposal comparable in its reach to Lyndon B. Johnson's War on Poverty. That war ended in stalemate, and plenty of critics are hoping for an even worse fate for the Clinton health care reform. Considering the vested interests threatened by the plan and the sheer size of the health care industry, the chances that any final plan will closely resemble the initial proposal are slim.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | October 4, 1999
BILL Bradley, in his 18 years in the Senate, had a reputation for extreme caution. He not only looked before he leaped in taking positions on controversial issues, but he also sometimes did a fair imitation of a guy putting his ear to the ground before crossing the railroad tracks to make sure a train wasn't coming.Last spring, as he conducted his low-profile campaign for the 2000 Democratic presidential nomination, he settled for being a listener to voters, turning aside reporters' inquiries for details of his agenda with promises he would spell them out later.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik | November 23, 1997
PRESIDENT Clinton endorsed a health care "bill of rights" Thursday that was proposed, with one dissenting vote, by an advisory commission.If approved by Congress, it would require HMOs and health plans to give patients detailed information about physicians and would establish an independent, outside review panel to handle patient complaints. And Clinton challenged health plans to adopt the standards voluntarily before Congress acts."Whether it's traditional health care or managed care, we have to make sure it's not inferior care," the president said.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 16, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton announced a crackdown on Medicare fraud yesterday, targeting the burgeoning home health care market that accounts for a rapidly growing share of federal spending on the elderly.Under the president's plan, Medicare will stop signing up new home health care providers while the Health Care Financing Administration devises new regulations to better screen applicants."During this moratorium, we'll develop tough new regulations to ensure that no fly-by-night providers enter or remain in the Medicare program," Clinton told the Service Employees International Union in Washington.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Bob Dole invoked President Clinton's failed effort to overhaul the nation's health care system yesterday as the "defining moment" of his presidency, saying it symbolized Clinton's dedication to big and expensive government programs.Dole made his remarks on the eve of the anniversary of the president's speech to Congress announcing his ambitious -- and ultimately unsuccessful -- plan to guarantee health insurance for all Americans. The remarks came in Dole's weekly radio program.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The federal role in regulating smoking has been an issue in the administration of every president since Dwight D. Eisenhower, but only two presidents have been willing to get personally involved.The first was Jimmy Carter, a celebrated micromanager, who still crusades against tobacco companies. The second is President Clinton.This week, according to top White House aide George Stephanopoulos, Mr. Clinton began wading through a 3-inch-thick packet of documents relating to the nicotine content of cigarettes, the latest flash point between the anti-smoking lobby and the tobacco industry.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- From the first weeks of the Clinton administration, Treasury Department officials expressed profound doubts about major parts of the president's plan to overhaul the nation's health care system, White House records made public yesterday show.The administration released 234 boxes of working papers of Hillary Rodham Clinton's Task Force on National Health Care Reform, after fighting for 18 months to keep the boxes, each containing about 2,500 pages, secret.In the documents, economists warn that the president's plan had "fatal flaws" that could cause "real-world havoc" and "potential disasters" for the nation's health care system.
NEWS
By TRB | November 5, 1993
Washington. -- Forty percent of Americans will pay more for health insurance under President Clinton's reform plan. Scare stories to this effect dominated the news over Halloween weekend. Opposition ghouls gleefully pounced on these figures as proving the Clinton plan to be fatally flawed.The fuss is ridiculous, for two reasons. First, virtually all Americans will pay more for health insurance under Mr. Clinton's reform, other reforms, or no reform.Nothing will stop the inexorable rise of health-care costs; the best hope is to slow that rise.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 10, 1994
WASHINGTON -- When two moderate senators recently became the first Democrats to publicly reject the Clinton health care reform plan in favor of a less ambitious Republican alternative, the Democratic chairman of the Senate Finance Committee was delighted.In fact, Chairman Daniel Patrick Moynihan, the brainy and blunt New Yorker who has been struggling to build a consensus around the Clinton bill, had encouraged Sen. David L. Boren of Oklahoma to join Sen. Bob Kerrey of Nebraska in their defection.
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