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Clinton And Gore

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By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF Reporter Peter Jensen contributed to this article | May 3, 1997
Maybe it's that Baltimore's proximity to Washington makes a president's trip here seem more like a commuter's shuttle than a state visit. Or that Bill Clinton has been here so many times before.Whatever it was, a visit to the Inner Harbor yesterday by President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore barely raised TC eyebrows. Except for those irked by the long line of shiny limos and police escorts that held up waterfront traffic, Baltimore seemed unable to muster much excitement.The nation's chief executive wasn't here long.
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NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 3, 2000
PHILADELPHIA -- Abruptly abandoning the campaign's positive tone, Dick Cheney claimed the second spot on the Republican ticket last night with a stinging assault on the "squandered" opportunities of the Clinton-Gore years. After two days in which Al Gore's name wasn't mentioned from the stage, Gov. George W. Bush's mild-mannered running mate fed his party a heaping portion of anti-Gore rhetoric. His acid words, coolly delivered in a conversational tone, unleashed a gusher of pent-up fervor when he reminded the convention crowd that Clinton and Gore's term would soon be ending.
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NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | July 27, 1992
Washington -- I got telephone calls throughout the Bill Clinton-Al Gore bus-capade from people asking why I am not expressing unease over two ''Southern yuppies'' rushing out to woo middle American whites.''I'd reject them as stupid if they didn't do that,'' I said to one caller, ''because they will need those white votes to win. Don't be fooled by the huge lead Clinton and Gore now have in the polls.''A black caller asked, ''Don't you think it's terrible that Clinton and Gore are writing off the black vote?
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 12, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Republicans in Congress have begun to blame the Clinton administration generally and Vice President Al Gore in particular for the recent jump in the price of gasoline, and it seems sure to become a hot issue in the presidential race. When prices started to rise, "the administration was asleep at the wheel," Rep. Dick Armey of Texas, the House majority leader, said last week. Sen. Frank H. Murkowski of Alaska said flatly what was on the minds of many of his fellow Republicans: "This is going to be a big issue in the political campaign."
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 3, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Attorney General Janet Reno went out of her way yesterday to stress that the FBI's investigation of possible wrongdoing in the 1996 campaign will continue."
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Lyle Denniston and Carl M. Cannon and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 4, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Attorney General Janet Reno moved yesterday to delve more deeply into the legality of Vice President Al Gore's fund-raising telephone calls but found no reason to open a new inquiry of Gore or President Clinton on other accusations of campaign finance wrongdoing.Reno said the Justice Department had not had enough time to investigate Gore's calls from the White House complex. As a result, she said, she was moving from a preliminary 30-day review to a 60-day inquiry that will be wider-ranging and could lead her to seek an independent counsel.
NEWS
July 10, 1992
By selecting a running mate from Tennessee, which is next door to his Arkansas, Gov. Bill Clinton has caused many to think of it as a regional ticket.After yesterday's announcement, Republicans, whose base the South has been, were quick to denounce Sen. Albert Gore Jr. as more liberal than Southerner.By Southern standards, he does have a relatively liberal voting record in the Senate. But by the traditional ways of measuring liberalism in politics, Senator Gore is closer to the center of the ideological spectrum than most non-Southern Democrats.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | December 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Attorney General Janet Reno's decision not to recommend appointment of an independent counsel to look into office phone calls from President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore seeking campaign contributions was the right one, but that decision should not end the matter of Clinton-Gore abuses in fund-raising.Small potatoesIt was ridiculous on the face of the matter to go after the two ranking officials of the federal government on the minor point of what telephones they used, and from what office.
NEWS
By Jack Germond & Jules Witcover | August 7, 1992
DAVENPORT, Iowa -- When Gov. Bill Clinton and Sen. Al Gore resumed their unorthodox bus caravan up the Mississippi Valley the other day, their wordsmiths dubbed it "On the Road to Change America." The planned message was that the young Southerners were traveling salesmen peddling new medicine for the sick American economy, and they did that.They recited all the familiar criticisms of President Bush and Vice President Dan Quayle as the embodiments of the status quo, and Gore led cooperative crowds in his favorite chant for change at home: "What time is it?"
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 24, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton personally requested a list of potential contributors whom he offered to call to try to raise $1 million for the Democratic National Committee early last year, according to a White House memorandum recently turned over to congressional investigators.Several days after making that request, Clinton was presented with a list of donors that the Democratic committee thought would be especially receptive to an appeal "from you," the memorandum said.And in the weeks after Clinton had asked to call the donors, five people on the president's list gave $50,000 and $100,000 checks to the Democrats, according to Federal Election Commission records.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- When President Clinton strides into the State House Convention Center in Little Rock, Ark., tonight to greet more than 500 of his dearest friends, he will do something that historians say no president has ever done before: raise money for his designated successor in a contested nominating process.Tonight's fund-raiser, expected to bring in more than $500,000 for Vice President Al Gore, has also raised some scattered questions about the propriety of the titular head of the Democratic Party aiding a candidate who has yet to secure his party's nomination.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 20, 1998
President Clinton came to Baltimore yesterday to make a major environmental announcement, raise about $300,000 for the Democratic Party and, literally, test the waters.The policy announcement was the formal unveiling of the administration's sweeping long-term plan to improve the quality of America's rivers, lakes and coastal waterways. The fund-raiser was a $10,000-a-person event at the Harbor Court Hotel attended by some three dozen donors and Maryland Democrats, including Gov. Parris N. Glendening, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and Sens.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 8, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In a blunt challenge to Attorney General Janet Reno, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee appealed yesterday to FBI Director Louis J. Freeh to launch his own investigation of Democratic fund-raising improprieties.Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, a Utah Republican, said Freeh has authority to undertake a "concurrent" inquiry independent of the probe already being conducted under Reno's broad direction.Freeh should do that, Hatch asserted, because the FBI director has differed with Reno's decision not to seek an independent counsel to review fund-raising efforts by President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | December 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Attorney General Janet Reno's decision not to recommend appointment of an independent counsel to look into office phone calls from President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore seeking campaign contributions was the right one, but that decision should not end the matter of Clinton-Gore abuses in fund-raising.Small potatoesIt was ridiculous on the face of the matter to go after the two ranking officials of the federal government on the minor point of what telephones they used, and from what office.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 3, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Attorney General Janet Reno went out of her way yesterday to stress that the FBI's investigation of possible wrongdoing in the 1996 campaign will continue."
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 13, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In a process shrouded in secrecy by the White House, President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore were questioned by Justice Department investigators Tuesday about their role in soliciting large campaign donations by telephone last year.Neither White House officials nor private lawyers for Clinton and Gore would disclose yesterday the substance of the questions or the answers. The interviews occurred three weeks before Attorney General Janet Reno must decide whether to request an independent prosecutor to investigate whether Clinton or Gore broke a law against fund-raising on federal property.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 13, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In a process shrouded in secrecy by the White House, President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore were questioned by Justice Department investigators Tuesday about their role in soliciting large campaign donations by telephone last year.Neither White House officials nor private lawyers for Clinton and Gore would disclose yesterday the substance of the questions or the answers. The interviews occurred three weeks before Attorney General Janet Reno must decide whether to request an independent prosecutor to investigate whether Clinton or Gore broke a law against fund-raising on federal property.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,Staff Writer | August 8, 1992
MINNEAPOLIS -- The rain drizzled steadily on Allard Peck's dairy farm in Chippewa Falls, Wis., and on Bill Clinton and Al Gore yesterday afternoon, but nobody seemed to mind. Several hundred hearty voters and their children stood in the open and applauded as the two Democrats paused in their traveling road show to preach their message of change.On a day of unfriendly skies that kept crowds down somewhat but didn't seem to dampen their enthusiasm or that of the candidates, the Democratic team rolled through rural Wisconsin for a windup in Minneapolis.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Lyle Denniston and Carl M. Cannon and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 4, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Attorney General Janet Reno moved yesterday to delve more deeply into the legality of Vice President Al Gore's fund-raising telephone calls but found no reason to open a new inquiry of Gore or President Clinton on other accusations of campaign finance wrongdoing.Reno said the Justice Department had not had enough time to investigate Gore's calls from the White House complex. As a result, she said, she was moving from a preliminary 30-day review to a 60-day inquiry that will be wider-ranging and could lead her to seek an independent counsel.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | September 24, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The decision by Attorney General Janet Reno to consider an independent counsel investigation of President Clinton is one that changes the basic nature of the controversy over how the White House raised campaign money last year.It presents the possibility that the Democratic Party will carry a heavy burden into the campaigns of 1998 and 2000.Ms. Reno had no choice except to take the preliminary steps that could lead to a special prosecutor for the president once she had done the same thing for Vice President Al Gore.
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