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Clint Eastwood

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NEWS
March 31, 1993
It's hard to say whether the four Oscars awarded to Clint Eastwood's revisionist Western "Unforgiven" owed more to the film's artistic merit or to Hollywood's guilty conscience over having neglected the craggy-faced actor for so long. Either way, the recognition was richly deserved.Mr. Eastwood made his name in the 1960s playing remorseless desperados in a string of movies that included Italian-made spaghetti Westerns like "The Good, The Bad and The Ugly." There followed a series of detective movies in which he played the crime-busting renegade "Dirty Harry," who was notable primarily for his laconic attitude toward killing -- "Go ahead: Make my day."
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NEWS
February 9, 2012
I didn't see Clint Eastwood's Super Bowl commercial for Chrysler - after Madonna's grotesque halftime performance, I turned the game off. Yet I couldn't miss the Monday morning fallout ("Critics go gunning for Eastwood spot," Feb. 7). I don't consider his ad political - I consider it insulting to Americans who are not enjoying any "halftime. " It might have occurred to Mr. Eastwood and the Chrysler honchos they should have spent their advertising dollars and creative talent thanking U.S. taxpayers for the bailout.
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NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 1, 1996
"Clint Eastwood: A Biography" by Richard Schickel. Knopf. 537 pages. $26.Eschewing the predictable Hollywood formulas of Spielberg or the avant-garde self-consciousness of Scorsese and Coppola, Clint Eastwood, in ""The Outlaw Josey Wales," ""Unforgiven" and ""Bridges of Madison County," has become a major film director. The actor who first was seen in Sergio Leone's ""spaghetti Westerns" and then as Dirty Harry, the rogue cop at war with the Constitution, has be come an auteur of grace and craft.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | February 10, 2009
Starring Melissa Leo, Misty Upham. Written and directed by Courtney Hunt. Released by Sony Pictures. $28.95 *** 1/2 (3 1/2 STARS) dvds Melissa Leo, still thought of fondly in Baltimore for playing Sgt. Kay Howard in Homicide: Life On the Street, is simultaneously tender, powerful and vulnerable in Frozen River, a quiet drama about family, sacrifice and loyalty among people who live on little else. Leo plays Ray Eddy, a mother of two living near an Indian reservation along New York's U.S.-Canadian border, whose gambling-addicted husband has fled a few days before Christmas.
FEATURES
By Kenneth Turan and Kenneth Turan,Los Angeles Times | March 30, 1993
HOLLYWOOD -- Call it a coronation of the common man. Clint Eastwood, an underappreciated foot soldier for much of his career, was king of all he surveyed last night as his "Unforgiven" won Oscars for best direction and best picture at the 65th Academy Awards.Though the success of "Unforgiven" was expected, especially after it walked off with two of the evening's first three Oscars, the evening's climax was no less emotional for that. The audience at the Dorothy Chandler Pavillion erupted into roars when his name was announced for the evening's last two awards.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1995
To harried, last-minute holiday shoppers, security guards at the Cranberry Mall in Westminster seem to be everywhere. Uniformly dressed in black, they answer even routine questions with a snappy, "Yes, ma'am!" or "No, sir!"According to Aaron Coleman, the mall's 30-year-old director of security, it's all part of the image he wants to project.He preaches high visibility, communication, education, community outreach and customer service as much as crime prevention."It's a highly proactive, innovative and aggressive approach that most mall security agencies are using, but we want to take it a step farther," he said.
FEATURES
By John Hartl and John Hartl,Seattle Times | September 13, 1990
TELLURIDE, Colo. -- For an actor who is famous for playing threatening authority figures, Clint Eastwood is an awfully nice guy.Like Arnold Schwarzenegger, who is also utterly disarming in person, Eastwood doesn't intimidate people off-screen. He's soft-spoken, thoughtful, almost shy, willing to talk about his movies but equally enthusiastic when the discussion drifts to the history of jazz or his days as a lifeguard in the 1940s.Of course, there's always been a side to Eastwood that has little to do with Dirty Harry or the "man with no name" of his spaghetti westerns.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 10, 1995
Now here's a high concept for a movie: Sharon Stone is Clint Eastwood.It makes sense: Both have faces so lean, angular and epic they resemble the landscape photography of Ansel Adams, and both look good in leather.And upon that sturdy rock is "The Quick and the Dead" built. It's a tale of the West, the West that was west not of St. Louis but of Rome back in the '60s when Eastwood quit shaving, strapped on an Uberti-replica Colt and made himself an international star in three movies from the outlaw genius Sergio Leone.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | August 2, 1992
New York--He's been good, he's been bad, he's been ugly, but who would ever guess the man with no name is talky? In fact, despite his screen image as a taciturn and guarded presence, Clint Eastwood turns out to be a real magpie.Talk, talk, talk, talk! The lanky movie star kicks back with a vengeance, takes a swig on a bottle of Perrier, and lets fly. Wait a minute? Eastwood? With an effete bubbly effervescence out of a delicate green bottle that looks like a Ming vase?Yes indeed, that is the man's poison of choice, and when you say that, smile.
NEWS
June 24, 1996
WASHINGTON's latest attempt to be the bully boy of world trade is an affront to international law. This country now finds itself in the awkward position of championing "secondary boycotts" against Cuba, Iran and Libya after years of deploring Arab efforts to impose such sanctions on Israel.President Clinton has a glib explanation for this contradiction: Israel is a democracy, but Cuba is a dictatorship, Iran is a terrorist state and Libya shot down Pan Am flight 103.Sorry, our lawyer-president flunks his law quiz.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 31, 2008
It's only appropriate that Changeling is being released on Halloween, for the real-life story on which it is based is as horrific as they come. Unfortunately, director Clint Eastwood can't move past his shock and incredulity over events that made a mockery of every value he seems to hold dear - honesty, justice, honor, conviction - and search for something deeper. The result is a film that plays like a creaking melodrama, with good guys and bad guys and precious little in between. In 1928, after her young son, Walter, was discovered missing from their Los Angeles home, Christine Collins went to the police.
FEATURES
By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,Los Angeles Times | June 4, 2008
HOLLYWOOD - On a recent afternoon at the Warner Bros. lot, Clint Eastwood took a break from a long day in the editing bay and strolled over to a hushed screening room. There, his armed-and-dangerous past was waiting for him, and the filmmaker winced when he looked it in the eye. "Who's that young fella?" he asked, a flicker of a smile crossing his famously craggy face. Up on the screen was Eastwood, circa 1971, staring down the barrel of a huge gun with an expression of cruel calmness.
FEATURES
January 26, 2007
WHAT YOU SAY My favorite Clint Eastwood movies are Two Mules for Sister Sara and The Outlaw Josey Wales. Both are packed with action, but are of a more refined style than the "spaghetti" westerns of his early career. The romantic and comedic interplay between Clint and co-star Shirley MacLaine in Two Mules is great. In Josey Wales, Clint plays a more conflicted character than in Two Mules. The viewer can empathetically understand Clint's transformation from simple farmer to aggrieved avenger after the wanton destruction of his home and family by border raiders.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | January 19, 2007
Clint Eastwood's critical hit and box-office bomb, Flags of Our Fathers, fumbled its Marines'-eye view of the Battle of Iwo Jima over 36 bloody days early in 1945. Its awkward combat scenes echoed but didn't match the D-Day sequence in Steven Spielberg's Saving Private Ryan. Its choppy home- front scenes about the U.S. propaganda machine plunged into maudlin melodrama. Eastwood was justly lauded for trying to go beyond a rah-rah point-of-view. But the fog of war was more like smog in the gray visual and emotional palette of Flags of Our Fathers.
FEATURES
By John Horn and John Horn,Los Angeles Times | December 1, 2006
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.-- --Most screenwriters prefer working in a quiet office. Some seek out coffee shops, while others hole up in hotel rooms. Paul Haggis didn't have the time for any of that - he was typing on a laptop in the passenger seat of a van bounding down Interstate 25 at 70 mph. The creative voice behind the past two best picture winners - he wrote Million Dollar Baby and co-wrote and directed Crash - Haggis also shares screenplay credit on...
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | September 26, 2005
CHICAGO -- When a mosquito-borne disease killed dozens of Americans in 2002, the satirical newspaper The Onion had a headline: "Bush sends troops to West Nile." President Bush has the right instincts to inspire trust in his wartime leadership. But complex domestic challenges don't play to his strengths. Some people find it puzzling that a president whose words did so much to rally Americans after 9/11 has been unable to find his voice after Hurricane Katrina inflicted even greater destruction.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 31, 2008
It's only appropriate that Changeling is being released on Halloween, for the real-life story on which it is based is as horrific as they come. Unfortunately, director Clint Eastwood can't move past his shock and incredulity over events that made a mockery of every value he seems to hold dear - honesty, justice, honor, conviction - and search for something deeper. The result is a film that plays like a creaking melodrama, with good guys and bad guys and precious little in between. In 1928, after her young son, Walter, was discovered missing from their Los Angeles home, Christine Collins went to the police.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC Research by Jordon Rockwell | May 30, 1996
If you see him around town, you may be surprised. So powerful and forbidding on screen, Clint Eastwood, who is starring in and directing "Absolute Power" here this June, is a somewhat more human figure in the flesh.He's tall and spindly and strangely high-waisted. He's one of those spidery guys, like the great basketball player George Gervin, with abnormally long arms, a kind of concave spine and a head that seems large for the wiriness of the frame that supports it. It's the framing of the lens that gives him that lean, mythological look; that turns his eyes to lasers and his mouth into a grim statement of mayhem; without it, he's another man who slips into his pants one leg at a time, just like you and me, brother.
NEWS
By BALTIMORESUN.COM STAFF | July 18, 2005
Absolute Power (1997) Clint Eastwood stars as the sensitive thief who can save the entire American political system from complete corruption. Too bad he wasn't around during the Reagan administration. Eastwood discovers presidential corruption during his final heist before being arrested, but not before he and Gene Hackman appear in several sites around Baltimore. The Towson Court House doubles as the site of a presidential press conference, Brooklandville's Maryvale Prep is the mansion, and Eastwood shows the thief's artsy side while sketching at the Walters' Art Gallery.
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