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By John Boudreau and John Boudreau,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 19, 2000
SAN JOSE, Calif. - When Kathryn Tunstall was diagnosed with breast cancer in July 1998, she thought of her two children, her life, the best way to battle the disease. Then - in the Silicon Valley way - she thought of a business plan: There must be a better method to link patients with possibly life-saving clinical trials. "I started putting things together," she says. "I realized there's a real opportunity to meet the needs of patients, to provide information to make better decisions. . . . There's a business here.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Late last year, medical device maker Zimmer Holdings Inc. made two large payments to Dr. Andrew N. Pollak, chair of the University of Maryland Medical System's orthopedics department. The payments, one for $47,225 and the other for $45,902, were royalties paid to Pollak for work he did at Maryland Shock Trauma Center starting seven years ago in helping develop a clamp known as a fixator that could hold trauma patient's broken bones straight until they were ready for surgical repair.
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BUSINESS
September 21, 1996
Gaithersburg-based Antex Biologics announced yesterday that it has begun an early stage clinical trial of an orally administered vaccine to protect against a bacteria that causes gastroenteritis and diarrhea in many Third World countries.The publicly held biotechnology company, which went by the name MicroCarb until changing it this month, said 100 volunteers at military institutions in Maryland have been signed up for the trial.The trial's goal is to determine the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine with an additive that the company believes will improve immune responses.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2014
A white powdered chemical compound emerged from two University of Maryland School of Medicine laboratories more than 10 years ago with a name destined for oblivion, but a future that now looks promising as a treatment for the most challenging cases of prostate cancer. Today, VN/124-1 is a drug candidate with a name - galeterone - a pharmaceutical company founded on its potential and a record of strong preliminary results in clinical trials with human patients. The Food and Drug Administration has put galeterone on a fast track for approval to treat prostate cancer, which kills about 30,000 men a year in the United States.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2005
Tamir Orbach had just learned that he had a potentially fatal bone marrow disease when he had to grapple with an extraordinarily difficult choice. Should he have the standard treatment - a bone-marrow transplant with high-dose chemotherapy and radiation, which could cause life-threatening complications itself? Or should he choose a transplant and an experimental, lower-dose treatment that might be easier on his body but was unproven? "I was terrified," said Orbach, 31, of Gaithersburg, who was told last year that he had an aggressive case of a rare bone-marrow disease known as PNH. Like Orbach, patients and their families are often overwrought when they are asked to consider participating in a clinical trial.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1998
An article in the Feb. 10 Business section inaccurately stated that two small human clinical trials of a protein-based drug to speed wound healing represent Human Genome Sciences Inc.'s first human drug trials. They represent the company's second and third trials. Also, the identity of the pharmaceutical company that has first rights to an option to co-develop and market the drug was inaccurate. Schering Plough holds the option.The Sun regrets the errors.Human Genome Sciences Inc., the Rockville biotechnology firm, will announce today that it will start a small clinical trial within the next few weeks on a treatment it has developed to speed up the healing of wounds.
FEATURES
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 1998
In the next few weeks, 300 volunteers in the Baltimore-Washington area are going to be enlisted to take an experimental AIDS vaccine, part of the vaccine's first large-scale human test, which began Tuesday across the country.That's just one clinical trial at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Right now, there are 362 clinical trials of medicines, therapies or products taking place there. At the University of Maryland Medical Center, 201 trials are under way. And that's just at two medical centers in the Baltimore area.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 24, 2005
In 2000, amid rising concerns that its painkiller Vioxx posed heart risks, Merck overruled one of its scientists after he suggested that a patient in a clinical trial had probably died of a heart attack. In an e-mail exchange about Vioxx, the company's most important new drug at the time, a senior Merck scientist repeatedly encouraged the researcher to change his views about the death "so that we don't raise concerns." In subsequent reports to the Food and Drug Administration and in a paper published in 2003, Merck designated the cause of death as "unknown" for the patient, a 73-year-old woman.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Ivan Penn and Julie Bell and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2004
Merck & Co. pulled its blockbuster painkiller Vioxx from the market yesterday after identifying an increased risk of heart attacks and strokes, sending its stock into a tailspin and prompting patients to begin switching to alternatives as pharmacies cleared the drug from shelves. Earlier studies had raised questions about the cardiovascular side effects associated with Vioxx, which the Food and Drug Administration approved in 1999 after concluding that tests showed it was safe and effective for treating osteoarthritis symptoms and pain.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | December 8, 2006
Although doctors were disappointed this week when Pfizer Inc. stopped clinical trials of a drug designed to boost levels of "good cholesterol," experts say there are other methods of increasing levels of protective, high-density lipoproteins (HDL) in the blood. The bad news: most of them require willpower. "The cornerstones are diet and exercise," said Dr. Roger Blumenthal, head of the preventive cardiology program at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. "The only real medication that has an impact on HDL is niacin."
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
A Sinai Hospital cardiologist is launching a clinical trial of a type of coronary artery disease drug not yet tested in humans, building on a history at the Baltimore hospital of research to develop more effective treatments to prevent blood clotting. Dr. Paul Gurbel is studying an intravenous drug for patients undergoing cardiac stenting, when mesh tubes are implanted to widen blocked arteries. The drug, known for now as PZ-128, would be given to patients after stent implantation to prevent platelets from sticking together around the device, potentially leading to heart attack.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
An estimated 3.5 million cancer patients around the globe are in severe pain from their disease, but many get no relief. In poor countries the cost is considered too high for drugs like morphine when such opioids are often stolen, abused or not taken according to instruction. But some Johns Hopkins University scientists have been working on a solution for those patients, as well as some in the United States, that uses a flexible button-sized disk implanted under the skin that releases consistent doses of painkiller over a month.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
Maryland has hosted 1,775 clinical trials for new medicines targeting six major chronic diseases since 1999, including 369 that are still in the early stages of recruiting patients, according to a study by two pharmaceutical industry groups released Friday. The report assessed the economic impact of clinical trials in the state, noting that the industry helped support 81,000 jobs, total employee salaries of $1.9 billion and $71 million in Maryland taxes as of 2008. More than half of the continuing clinical trials in the state are occurring in Baltimore, at the University of Maryland Medical Center and Johns Hopkins University, the report found.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2011
Gliknik Inc., a biopharmaceutical company based at the University of Maryland's BioPark in downtown Baltimore, said Monday it had won a $1.5 million contract from the National Cancer Institute to continue development of its cancer-fighting technology. The grant places the company on a path that could lead to clinical trials in two years, said David S. Block, Gliknik's chief executive. Since its formation in 2007, Gliknik has raised $10 million from investors, largely with the help of Maryland's biotechnology tax credit.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2011
Dr. Kenneth P. Johnson, former chairman of the department of neurology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and an internationally known expert on multiple sclerosis who developed new treatments for the disease, died Saturday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Lutherville resident was 79. "Ken was a visionary in the field of multiple sclerosis and where it was going and developing new therapies. He will be remembered as a very kind person who was wonderful with his multiple sclerosis patients to which he was totally devoted to curing," said Dr. Christopher T. Bever, a longtime colleague who is a professor of neurology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and chief of the neurology service at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Baltimore.
HEALTH
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2010
As she organizes her second annual run to raise funds for breast cancer research, Darby Steadman is facing what she calls a delightful dilemma. She has no shortage of runners. The event in a Millersville park next Saturday is maxed out at about 250 registered participants and dozens of volunteers. The Driving Miss Darby Foundation, a nonprofit organization founded by Steadman and friends, may have to close registrations. "Isn't that a nice problem to have?" said the 40-year-old mother of two, who is battling breast cancer . Undeterred by the possibility of too many participants, she has expanded the event to "dozers.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1996
Gaithersburg-based MedImmune Inc. announced yesterday that it has completed enrolling patients for its late-stage clinical trial to test the effectiveness and safety of a treatment it is developing for the prevention of a leading cause of pneumonia and bronchitis in infants and small children, respiratory syncytial virus disease, or RSV.The biotechnology company said it has enrolled 1,503 patients for the clinical trial.The trial is being conducted at 139 medical centers in the United States, Canada and Britain to evaluate the treatment, called MEDI-493.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2003
Baltimore-based Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc. has raised $27.4 million through a private stock placement to fund a clinical trial of a heart-treatment drug it acquired in October from Merck & Co. Guilford said yesterday that it has placed 4.8 million shares of its common stock with institutional investors at a price of $5.67 per share. The company also issued seven-year warrants to the investors to purchase about 960,000 shares of stock at an exercise price of $7.55 per share. The proceeds are to be used to fund the final round of human testing of the Aggrastat injection to treat heart attacks.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and David Kohn and Chris Emery and David Kohn,Sun reporters | January 15, 2008
Many African-American patients refuse to join medical studies because they fear they will be lied to and harmed by scientists who view them as human guinea pigs, according to a study by Johns Hopkins researchers. Confirming the observations of many researchers, the study might explain why clinical trials of new therapies fail to enroll enough black participants - and why trials might fail to predict how blacks will react to new drugs and medical devices. Incidents such as the Tuskegee study - the infamous 40-year experiment in which researchers withheld treatment from black men with syphilis - have left many blacks wary of doctors and medical research, the Hopkins researchers concluded.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | November 14, 2007
The failure of Merck & Co.'s once-promising AIDS vaccine has cast a pall over research efforts and forced delays in trials of other experimental vaccines as scientists ponder what went wrong. After more than two decades of work, vaccine researchers were hoping to be further along. Even if other vaccine initiatives eventually succeed, the arduous process of development and testing means that there won't be an immunization to prevent HIV for at least another decade, one top federal researcher says.
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