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NEWS
May 26, 1993
Former county student inducted into clinical research societyDr. Peter George Traber, son of Peter and Florence Traber of Columbia Town Center, has been elected to the American Society for Clinical Research. The induction was held May 2 in Washington.Dr. Traber is the chief of the Division of Gastroenterology at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.He attended Glenelg and Mount Hebron High Schools and graduated magna cum laude from the University of Michigan on a football scholarship with a degree in biochemical engineering in 1977.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | November 19, 2013
Just as Sean Hull's career and personal goals were jelling, his mother was suddenly hospitalized. Two days later, she was gone. An insidious disease called sarcoidosis -- which is still being studied after decades of research -- took Hull's mother's life, and the Ellicott City resident still has questions about what causes the mysterious illness. In her memory, Hull established the Life and Breath Foundation in 1998, just two years after her passing. He was 31 at the time. Ida E. Hull was only 59 when she lost her fight against an illness that no one, including her, knew she had. Though she had silently struggled for 13 years with the inflammatory disease, which causes lesions called granulomas to form on internal organs, family members only learned what had killed her from an autopsy.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon | December 15, 2008
Deb Dietz, who helped set up clinical research trials of new HIV therapies, died of lung cancer Dec. 7 at her Ellicott City home. She was 59. Born in Baltimore, Ms. Dietz graduated from Towson High School and the University of Maryland, College Park. She earned a master's degree in counseling from Loyola College and postgraduate degrees in nursing and organizational development from the Johns Hopkins University. Before her illness, Ms. Dietz was most recently employed at Social & Scientific Systems in Silver Spring, where she was project director for the Community Program for Clinical Research on AIDS.
HEALTH
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
Roughly 13 minutes into a science experiment involving sets of blocks, Dorian Larkins, who at that moment is two weeks shy of his third birthday, has had enough. He would rather play with the trains in the waiting room, and he says he has to pee. But at his mother's urging, he soldiers on for another five minutes or so until the session, which looks at toddler memory, wraps up. His mom believes it's imperative that Dorian participate in the work of the Laboratory for Child Development at Johns Hopkins University - but less so for her son's sake than for the researcher's.
NEWS
By William R. Brody | October 25, 2001
IN THE wake of any tragedy, including the suicide-terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon, people seek to assign blame. Congress already has begun singling out airport security systems for not detecting weapons on the airplane hijackers. The U.S. Senate wants Washington to take control of all airport security. That would mean federalizing and training a bureaucracy of 20,000 airport security inspectors. Is that the most effective and efficient way? I think not. Transportation Secretary Norman Y. Mineta agrees.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1991
ScienceClinical Science Research Ltd., based in Huntingdon, England, announces two appointments in its plans to expand its international operation.As part of the company's expansion into the North American market, Thomas J. Humphries is named head of CSR's Clinical Development business. He will be based at the CSR International office that the company recently opened in Baltimore.He brings years of experience in clinical research and development and has held senior clinical research posts at SmithKline Beecham, Merck Sharp and Dohme and PharmaKinetics.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2001
MedImmune Inc., citing its growth and a wealth of potential new drugs in development, announced three management hires yesterday. The Gaithersburg biopharmaceutical company said it appointed Jeffrey S. Hackman, formerly with Aventis Pasteur Inc., as marketing vice president; Peter A. Kiener, formerly with Bristol-Myers Squibb, as vice president for research; and Dr. Peter A. Patriarca, most recently with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, as vice...
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | September 11, 1994
Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have received more than $3 million from the federal government to expand a program that gives Baltimore AIDS patients increased access to experimental drug therapies.Under the grant this month, the Maryland program, called Baltimore TRIALS, joins 19 other institutions in a clinical research network funded by the National Institutes of Health.The network was developed five years ago in response to pressure from AIDS activists. Its goal is to offer the chance to receive new treatments to a broad spectrum of people who have the human immunodeficiency virus or people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2003
WASHINGTON - The National Institutes of Health unveiled a sweeping plan yesterday to involve more doctors in clinical trials, make technology widely available and reward scientists hoping to pursue bold but risky ideas. Dr. Elias Zerhouni, the agency's director since last year, said the plan would remove barriers that keep scientists from turning some of the great advances of recent years - such as the charting of the human genome - into treatments and cures. The plan, which he called the "NIH Roadmap," would unite scientists from disciplines as varied as engineering, physics and mathematics with medical specialists in the fight against specific diseases.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | November 19, 2013
Just as Sean Hull's career and personal goals were jelling, his mother was suddenly hospitalized. Two days later, she was gone. An insidious disease called sarcoidosis -- which is still being studied after decades of research -- took Hull's mother's life, and the Ellicott City resident still has questions about what causes the mysterious illness. In her memory, Hull established the Life and Breath Foundation in 1998, just two years after her passing. He was 31 at the time. Ida E. Hull was only 59 when she lost her fight against an illness that no one, including her, knew she had. Though she had silently struggled for 13 years with the inflammatory disease, which causes lesions called granulomas to form on internal organs, family members only learned what had killed her from an autopsy.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon | December 15, 2008
Deb Dietz, who helped set up clinical research trials of new HIV therapies, died of lung cancer Dec. 7 at her Ellicott City home. She was 59. Born in Baltimore, Ms. Dietz graduated from Towson High School and the University of Maryland, College Park. She earned a master's degree in counseling from Loyola College and postgraduate degrees in nursing and organizational development from the Johns Hopkins University. Before her illness, Ms. Dietz was most recently employed at Social & Scientific Systems in Silver Spring, where she was project director for the Community Program for Clinical Research on AIDS.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2003
WASHINGTON - The National Institutes of Health unveiled a sweeping plan yesterday to involve more doctors in clinical trials, make technology widely available and reward scientists hoping to pursue bold but risky ideas. Dr. Elias Zerhouni, the agency's director since last year, said the plan would remove barriers that keep scientists from turning some of the great advances of recent years - such as the charting of the human genome - into treatments and cures. The plan, which he called the "NIH Roadmap," would unite scientists from disciplines as varied as engineering, physics and mathematics with medical specialists in the fight against specific diseases.
NEWS
By William R. Brody | October 25, 2001
IN THE wake of any tragedy, including the suicide-terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon, people seek to assign blame. Congress already has begun singling out airport security systems for not detecting weapons on the airplane hijackers. The U.S. Senate wants Washington to take control of all airport security. That would mean federalizing and training a bureaucracy of 20,000 airport security inspectors. Is that the most effective and efficient way? I think not. Transportation Secretary Norman Y. Mineta agrees.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2001
MedImmune Inc., citing its growth and a wealth of potential new drugs in development, announced three management hires yesterday. The Gaithersburg biopharmaceutical company said it appointed Jeffrey S. Hackman, formerly with Aventis Pasteur Inc., as marketing vice president; Peter A. Kiener, formerly with Bristol-Myers Squibb, as vice president for research; and Dr. Peter A. Patriarca, most recently with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, as vice...
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1996
As part of a campaign to build more teaching, research and clinical space, representatives of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions yesterday unveiled designs for three buildings that would dramatically alter their East Baltimore campus.Construction is to begin first on the Cancer Research Building, a $50 million complex at the northeast corner of Orleans and Bond streets. With 10 levels, it would provide teaching and research space for about 400 people. Construction is scheduled to start early next year and be completed by early 1999.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | September 11, 1994
Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have received more than $3 million from the federal government to expand a program that gives Baltimore AIDS patients increased access to experimental drug therapies.Under the grant this month, the Maryland program, called Baltimore TRIALS, joins 19 other institutions in a clinical research network funded by the National Institutes of Health.The network was developed five years ago in response to pressure from AIDS activists. Its goal is to offer the chance to receive new treatments to a broad spectrum of people who have the human immunodeficiency virus or people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
HEALTH
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
Roughly 13 minutes into a science experiment involving sets of blocks, Dorian Larkins, who at that moment is two weeks shy of his third birthday, has had enough. He would rather play with the trains in the waiting room, and he says he has to pee. But at his mother's urging, he soldiers on for another five minutes or so until the session, which looks at toddler memory, wraps up. His mom believes it's imperative that Dorian participate in the work of the Laboratory for Child Development at Johns Hopkins University - but less so for her son's sake than for the researcher's.
NEWS
June 16, 1992
Citizens often must protect themselvesWhy have the liberal media launched a major new campaign against the private ownership of firearms by honest citizens? Could it be that reports from many major metropolitan areas show that people are purchasing firearms at record rates?People's awakening to the need to provide for their own security was brought about by the media's painfully accurate portrayal of the civil unrest in Los Angeles.Many an honest citizen had been lulled into a false sense of security by government officials and law enforcement bureaucrats.
NEWS
May 26, 1993
Former county student inducted into clinical research societyDr. Peter George Traber, son of Peter and Florence Traber of Columbia Town Center, has been elected to the American Society for Clinical Research. The induction was held May 2 in Washington.Dr. Traber is the chief of the Division of Gastroenterology at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.He attended Glenelg and Mount Hebron High Schools and graduated magna cum laude from the University of Michigan on a football scholarship with a degree in biochemical engineering in 1977.
NEWS
June 16, 1992
Citizens often must protect themselvesWhy have the liberal media launched a major new campaign against the private ownership of firearms by honest citizens? Could it be that reports from many major metropolitan areas show that people are purchasing firearms at record rates?People's awakening to the need to provide for their own security was brought about by the media's painfully accurate portrayal of the civil unrest in Los Angeles.Many an honest citizen had been lulled into a false sense of security by government officials and law enforcement bureaucrats.
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