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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
Volunteer lawyers will provide free legal advice to the public on June 1 in Baltimore. The Pro Bono Day will held between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. at the Maryland Legal Aid offices, 500 E. Lexington St. No appointments are necessary. The lawyers will meet one-on-one with individuals for brief consultations on a variety of issues, including housing, government benefits, expungement, bankruptcy, consumer debt, wills, divorce and child support. Individuals are asked to bring relevant documents.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Late last year, medical device maker Zimmer Holdings Inc. made two large payments to Dr. Andrew N. Pollak, chair of the University of Maryland Medical System's orthopedics department. The payments, one for $47,225 and the other for $45,902, were royalties paid to Pollak for work he did at Maryland Shock Trauma Center starting seven years ago in helping develop a clamp known as a fixator that could hold trauma patient's broken bones straight until they were ready for surgical repair.
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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
The Benjamin G Eaton Coaches Clinic, sponsored by Clearpath Academics, will be held at Dunbar on June 22. Maryland coach Randy Edsall will present the morning keynote address and Towson coach Rob Ambrose will present the afternoon address. Among the other workshops, West Virginia wide receivers coach Lonnie Galloway will present on “Wide Receiver Fundamentals,” Maryland running backs coach Andre Powell on “Running Back Drills With a Purpose,” Dunbar defensive coordinator Michael Carter on “Eliminating Explosive Gains,” and Calvert Hall coach Donald Davis on “Rebuilding a Program.” For more information, click here .
NEWS
Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
An American doctor who was exposed to Ebola while volunteering to treat patients with the virus in Sierra Leone was admitted to the National Institute of Health in Bethesda on Sunday, the institute said. The patient will be treated at the NIH Clinical Center's Special Clinical Studies Unit, which is "specifically designed to provide high-level isolation capabilities" and staffed by experts on infectious diseases and critical care, according to an NIH release. "The unit staff is trained in strict infection control practices optimized to prevent spread of potentially transmissible agents such as Ebola," the institute said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
A third person has been arrested by Baltimore County police as part of an investigation into the Healthy Life Medical Group prescription drug clinic in Lutherville, police said Monday. The arrest of Alina Margulis, 45, of Brooklyn, New York, on drug distribution conspiracy charges follows a May 15 raid of the clinic, in the 1100 block of York Road, by about 25 county police narcotics officers and Drug Enforcement Administration agents. Two men identified as the operators of the clinic - Michael Jacob Reznikov, 51, also of Brooklyn; and Gerald Wiseberg, 78, of Boca Raton, Fl. - were arrested the same day as the raid, also on drug distribution conspiracy charges.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
Students at Dunbar will share the high school's basketball court with a few Washington Wizards next week when the team hosts a clinic in advance of its Oct. 17 return to Baltimore. The session at Dunbar, scheduled for Sept. 19 from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., will be hosted by Baltimore native and Dunbar graduate Sam Cassell. He'll be joined by Wizards guards Bradley Beal and Garrett Temple, as well as Wizards assistant coach Ryan Saunders and player development coach Joe Connelly. Mike Riordan, who played six years for the Wizards franchise, including its final two seasons as the the Baltimore Bullets from 1971 to 1973, and Larry Stewart, who played for Coppin State and then the Washington Bullets from 1991 to 1995, will also be present.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | April 7, 2010
Annapolis lawmakers will not withhold any funds from the University of Maryland's law clinic for pursuing an unpopular environmental lawsuit, quieting a debate about academic freedom that raged in the state legislature last week. The decision reverses an earlier position taken by senators and House Appropriations members who initially were outraged that the law students named a small Eastern Shore farmer in an environmental lawsuit that targeted poultry giant Perdue. "It is hugely disappointing to the poultry industry on the Eastern Shore that the law school targets an industry that is so vitally important," Lowell Stoltzfus, an Eastern Shore Republican, said Tuesday evening.
SPORTS
By Tribune Newspapers | January 20, 2010
Tiger Woods is receiving treatment at a sex rehabilitation clinic in Mississippi, according to Benoit Denizet-Lewis, the author of a book titled "America Anonymous: Eight Addicts in Search of a Life." He's also a recovering sex addict and wrote in his blog Monday that Woods was in a Hattiesburg clinic, citing an unnamed source. Officials at the clinic have not confirmed that Woods is there. Denizet-Lewis has written for the New York Times Magazine, and spent some time at the same clinic, Pine Grove Behavioral Health & Addiction Services, a few years ago. He wrote that the programs at the clinic include group therapy sessions and family and couple's therapy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | July 22, 2011
On weekday mornings, I'll post the most controversial, shocking and (of course) ridiculous stories for your reading pleasure. That way, when you walk into work, you'll be the master of witty conversation. Articles  • They clearly need counseling: Gay 'barbarians' protest Bachmann clinic. ( Think Progress )  • This was probably a good use of money: Poll says God's approval rating at 52 percent. ( PPP )  Quote • "Not continuing a tax cut is not technically a tax increase," - Grover Norquist  Video • Tim Pawlenty's campaign is so amazingly analogous to the greatest hockey upset in history:   
EXPLORE
By Diane Pajak | December 14, 2011
Looking for an alternative to pharmaceuticals? Try heading east. Chinese herbs and acupuncture are the remedies of choice at Cheng's Acupuncture & Herbs Clinic, which opened in February in Columbia. The clinic is run by licensed acupuncturist Chengzhang Shi, who is certified by the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. He specializes in traditional Chinese medicine, which he first learned from his father, a traditional Chinese medicine professor in Beijing.
HEALTH
September 12, 2014
Federal health officials have awarded $3.5 million in Affordable Care Act funds to 14 community health centers in Maryland. The money will go to hire 60 new workers, expand hours and increase access to primary care. The money will also go to expand services to include dental care, mental health services, prescription drug coverage and vision services. The money is expected to provide care to more than 20,000 new patients around the state. See the list of centers receiving grants here . Around the nation, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded $295 million to 1,195 centers with ore than 9,000 sites.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2014
A white powdered chemical compound emerged from two University of Maryland School of Medicine laboratories more than 10 years ago with a name destined for oblivion, but a future that now looks promising as a treatment for the most challenging cases of prostate cancer. Today, VN/124-1 is a drug candidate with a name - galeterone - a pharmaceutical company founded on its potential and a record of strong preliminary results in clinical trials with human patients. The Food and Drug Administration has put galeterone on a fast track for approval to treat prostate cancer, which kills about 30,000 men a year in the United States.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
The medical system that provides care to Maryland's veterans signed a one-year contract with Evergreen Health Care in Baltimore to offer primary health services to new patients, federal and co-op officials said Thursday. The $485,000 contract aims to cut down on wait times that had become some of the worst in the nation. A June audit found Central Maryland's veterans were waiting an average of 80 days to see a primary-care doctor for an initial visit, the fourth longest wait in the nation.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
A chain of more than 50 mid-Atlantic physical therapy clinics that rebranded itself Pivot Physical Therapy earlier this month has added five clinics in West Virginia, officials said Wednesday. The chain has 37 facilities in Maryland, some of which were known as Maryland SportsCare & Rehab. Operations won't change at the facilities, but officials believe operating as one organization enables the company to leverage the reputation of more than 500 physical therapists, certified athletic trainers and support staff.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Nearly two months after People's Community Health Centers shut the doors to five low-income health clinics in Baltimore city and Anne Arundel County, a federal agency confirmed it is no longer providing critical grant money to the nonprofit group. People's had received $2.4 million a year from the Health Services Resources Administration to treat uninsured patients - its largest source of revenue. That loss comes as the organization faces a new federal tax lien nearly that doubled the amount it owes the Internal Revenue Service and mounting claims from employees seeking back pay. Yet Andrew Sindler, attorney for People's, said Monday the nonprofit hopes to pay off or settle its debts and has "some new opportunities in the works to revive the organization" under a new name and with new investors, though he declined to offer details.
HEALTH
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
As People's Community Health Centers' financial problems mounted and the closure of the group's clinics became inevitable, government and health officials formulated a plan to get a replacement clinic up and running in Anne Arundel County. In a matter of weeks, Chase Brexton Health Care opened a branch in Glen Burnie, in temporary office space and with staff borrowed from other clinics. As soon as the doors opened July 25, patients showed up needing help. "We hit the ground running," said Katie Meara, director of operations for the new Chase Brexton clinic on Aquahart Road in Glen Burnie.
EXPLORE
By Diane Pajak | August 31, 2011
Whether it's a sprained ankle, pinkeye, bronchitis or poison ivy, a new walk-in pediatric clinic in Columbia specializes in the needs of kids. KinderMender opened its doors in the Columbia Crossing Shopping Center in July, under the direction of Dr. Keyvan Rafei. The Columbia resident is the outgoing chief of pediatric emergency medicine and chairman of the pediatric asthma program at the University of Maryland Children's Hospital. He decided to open the new center as a way of “combining quality pediatric care with convenience and accessibility of urgent care,” he says.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
Hearing aids have improved the quality of many people's lives, but most users have learned they are less than ideal in noisy environments. Going to the airport, store or doctor's office can be frustrating, said Dr. Frank R. Lin, a Johns Hopkins Hospital otologist and epidemiologist. For the hospital clinic, the Listening Center, he sought a special system that can cut out audio clutter and transmit a speaker's voice directly to a person's hearing aid or cochlear implant. In addition to helping the estimated 5,000 patients who pass through the clinic each year, he's hoping to spark interest from other hospitals and public facilities in such a system, called a hearing loop, for their buildings.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Dr. Peter O. Kwiterovich Jr., an internationally known expert on lipid disorders who was the founder and director of the Johns Hopkins Lipid Clinic and was an early advocate for routine cholesterol screening in children, died Friday of prostate cancer at his Roland Park home. He was 74. "We have lost a true giant in the field of cardiovascular disease. He was one of the quiet pioneers at Hopkins," said Dr. George J. Dover, pediatrician-in-chief at Johns Hopkins Hospital and director of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
The developer says his planned center for heroin addicts in a North Baltimore neighborhood would be revolutionary: a primary care facility that would treat all aspects of addict's lives, not just dole out methadone. But Harwood residents see it as more of the same for a community they say is already filled with people bused in for addiction services. More addicts, they say, lead to more public urination, drug use and crime. "When the lifeboat is full, the next person being worthy doesn't make it any less likely to sink," said Joe McNeely, president of a neighborhood coalition opposed to the center.
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