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By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 17, 2002
SEVERN Elementary School recently celebrated an extra-special Back to School Night. Parents always look forward to meeting their children's new teachers and learning what to expect for the coming school year. But this year at Severn Elementary, the event also included a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the school's new educational climbing wall, marking the completion of a yearlong project that won the support of parents, businesses, faculty and pupils. The project was the brainchild of Aaron Vetter, who teaches physical education at the school.
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NEWS
By Matt Vensel | June 13, 2011
You know those amazing videos we see of minor-league managers flipping out and getting ejected from games in emphatic fashion ? We can now add Norfolk Tides manager Gary Allenson to the highlight reel. In Sunday’s 11-5 win over Durham, the manager of the Orioles’ Triple-A affiliate took objection to a home run getting switched to a ground-rule double by the umps. So Allenson sauntered out to the warning track, scaled the outfield wall and started looking for more phantom ground-rule doubles in the shrubbery in center field.
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NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2001
After almost two centuries of sailing and seamanship, Naval Academy midshipmen, bound for careers on the sea, are about to learn a new skill: rock climbing. Starting this summer, before classes begin, the academy is requiring all freshmen to learn the basics of climbing and rappelling, with the help of its new $400,000 rock-climbing wall. Officials are considering making rock climbing part of the school curriculum. The 47-foot wall, one of the largest on the East Coast, was more than 10 years in the making, largely because of midshipmen's efforts to win the support of the administration.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | May 3, 2009
Three or four times a week, Nicole Angeli straps on ropes and harnesses and clambers up the 33-foot climbing wall in the Johns Hopkins University recreation center. The 22-year-old senior says her strenuous climbs reduce stress from the demands of classes. But the climbing wall, installed by Hopkins in 2002 at a cost of $100,000, also represents the lengths to which universities go to pamper students - and one reason why college costs have soared in recent years, far outstripping inflation.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | October 16, 2008
For 13 years, Tommy Olds exercised in "a little dingy area" of a basement fitness room at the Ellicott City YMCA. "Water would leak in," the 79-year-old legal investigator said about the old exercise room at the facility on Montgomery Road. Like many members, Olds was enthusiastic about the $11.2 million project launched in April 2007 to expand and improve the facility. But though much of the work has been completed and new areas are in use - such as the climbing wall and the fitness room - members learned recently that the long-anticipated project is being hampered by delays and cost overruns.
NEWS
By SHERRY GRAHAM | August 8, 1995
They literally are climbing the walls at the SuperSports Arena in Eldersburg.Two Sykesville teens, Kjeld Lauritzen, 16, and Matt Taylor, 18, recently envisioned, built and now operate the area's only indoor climbing gym, called CRUX. The name was chosen because it's the term that describes the most difficult part of a climb.Kjeld and Matt met and became interested in rock climbing during their years in the Boy Scouts. Climbs at such locations as Great Falls, Harpers Ferry, Cunningham Falls and Annapolis Rocks in nearby Frederick provided the teens with several years of climbing experience.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 2000
Elaine Cherneski's gym classes have her pupils climbing walls. Literally. Cherneski is a physical education teacher at Freedom Elementary School in Sykesville, where a climbing wall has been installed to promote upper body strength, coordination and confidence. All first- through fifth-grade pupils use the Horizontal Bouldering Wall, which has epoxy handholds across it. Pupils stand on handholds while moving horizontally across the wall. "Sadly, in today's world, most kids are weak in upper body strength," said Cherneski, the driving force behind acquiring the wall.
NEWS
July 13, 2007
What: A day of free family-friendly activities to celebrate Columbia's 40th birthday. Where: Merriweather Post Pavilion, Columbia Town Center. When: Gates open at noon. Entry: Parking on Merriweather's lots and entry to the pavilion is free. No glass containers or alcohol can be brought in. Organizers plan to hold the event if it rains. Information: www.columbia40.com. Highlights Noon to 5:30 p.m.: Picnicking is encouraged on the Merriweather grounds, and concession stands will be open.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Staff writer | November 6, 1991
A Columbia business consultant has grand plans to open a family entertainment indoor sports complex in the former General Electric Dryer building next June. The complex would include scores of activities, from a rock climbing wall adorned with a waterfall to indoor skating and soccer rinks.Reginald N. Spencer, who heads Maryland Multi-Media and Marketing Management Inc., said he is in the process of raising $5 million to lease and develop a 150,000-square-foot area in the former Dryer building, which serves as a headquarters and warehouse for Luskin's Inc. and includes several other tenants, including a volleyball operation.
NEWS
June 29, 2003
The Carroll County Farm Museum will hold its annual Old-Fashioned July 4 Celebration starting at noon Friday. Visitors can spend the day picnicking on the 140-acre grounds, listening to music, shopping for handmade crafts, learning about life in the 1800s and enjoying the food available for sale. The day will begin with the Explorers youth group raising the American flag on the pole by the stage. Ray Owens will perform from noon to 12:45 p.m., the Old Line Statesmen Barbershop Chorus at 1 p.m., the Back Pages Band from 2 p.m. to 3:45 p.m., the Carroll County Cloggers at 4 p.m. and the Stillwater Band from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. In keeping with the farm museum's 19th-century setting, old-fashioned games such as hoop rolling and jacks will be held for children from noon to 2 p.m., followed by competitive games such as sack races and a lemon relay race from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. For those who prefer more modern fun, a new Kids' Corner will be set up with bounce-and-play inflatables provided by Fun Events LLC of Taneytown.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | October 16, 2008
For 13 years, Tommy Olds exercised in "a little dingy area" of a basement fitness room at the Ellicott City YMCA. "Water would leak in," the 79-year-old legal investigator said about the old exercise room at the facility on Montgomery Road. Like many members, Olds was enthusiastic about the $11.2 million project launched in April 2007 to expand and improve the facility. But though much of the work has been completed and new areas are in use - such as the climbing wall and the fitness room - members learned recently that the long-anticipated project is being hampered by delays and cost overruns.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | October 12, 2008
Janet, stop climbing like a man!" An ordinary woman might be a little intimidated or at least embarrassed by these words, especially if they are shouted at you while you are 30 feet off the floor on a wall at an indoor climbing gym. But not me. Of course, the instructor was referring to the fact that I was using my arms excessively to get up the wall, instead of my legs. If you think about climbing the way you ascend a ladder, it's obvious this makes little sense. But in the brief moments after he yelled to me, I realized he had summed up my entire life's philosophy in those prophetic words.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | February 10, 2008
I just watched King Lines, the rockumentary that follows Chris Sharma's audacious, worldwide quest to climb stunningly difficult rock formations, and I have to say: Now is definitely not the time to complain about the number of trips I made up and down the basement steps to refill the snacks during the Super Bowl. I would only feel justified in my exhaustion if I had repeatedly rappelled into the basement with a bag of tortilla chips snug in my belay device. Or if I had spent the evening "sending" (climbing term, probably a version of ascend)
NEWS
July 13, 2007
What: A day of free family-friendly activities to celebrate Columbia's 40th birthday. Where: Merriweather Post Pavilion, Columbia Town Center. When: Gates open at noon. Entry: Parking on Merriweather's lots and entry to the pavilion is free. No glass containers or alcohol can be brought in. Organizers plan to hold the event if it rains. Information: www.columbia40.com. Highlights Noon to 5:30 p.m.: Picnicking is encouraged on the Merriweather grounds, and concession stands will be open.
FEATURES
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | June 17, 2006
Jason Weesner is halfway up the wall when he hesitates. He briefly glances down to check his foot position, then plots his next move. Grip after grip, he pushes and pulls himself to the top of the 28-foot edifice, pauses for a moment and yells "take!" -- the rock climber's jargon for "get me down!" After he is lowered down the wall, he unties the knot in his rope and rests. This is Weesner's first indoor-rock-climbing session -- an introductory class at Earth Treks Climbing Center in Timonium.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 5, 2003
In the abstract, Kathy Anzivino believes there must be some pinnacle of amenities that universities simply cannot surpass, some outer limit so far beyond the hot tubs, waterfalls and pool slides she offers at the University of Houston that even the most pampered students will never demand it and the most recruitment-crazed colleges will never consent to put it on their grounds. She just has a hard time picturing what that might be. "There's got to be one, but what it is I don't know," said Anzivino, director of campus recreation at the university, which opened a $53 million wellness center this year.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 5, 2003
In the abstract, Kathy Anzivino believes there must be some pinnacle of amenities that universities simply cannot surpass, some outer limit so far beyond the hot tubs, waterfalls and pool slides she offers at the University of Houston that even the most pampered students will never demand it and the most recruitment-crazed colleges will never consent to put it on their grounds. She just has a hard time picturing what that might be. "There's got to be one, but what it is I don't know," said Anzivino, director of campus recreation at the university, which opened a $53 million wellness center this year.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2003
Clinging to the sheer face of a wall more than 30 feet above ground, April Camlin craned her head toward the sky. With the cautious deliberation of a chess player, she stretched one hand upward, grasping at an outcropping no larger than a tennis ball. The move allowed her to shift her feet and with one final push, reach the top of the 34-foot wall. Camlin, 19, of Baltimore, was one of more than a dozen Towson University students suspended in midair on a recent afternoon at the school's hottest recreational attraction -- its two three-story climbing walls.
NEWS
June 29, 2003
The Carroll County Farm Museum will hold its annual Old-Fashioned July 4 Celebration starting at noon Friday. Visitors can spend the day picnicking on the 140-acre grounds, listening to music, shopping for handmade crafts, learning about life in the 1800s and enjoying the food available for sale. The day will begin with the Explorers youth group raising the American flag on the pole by the stage. Ray Owens will perform from noon to 12:45 p.m., the Old Line Statesmen Barbershop Chorus at 1 p.m., the Back Pages Band from 2 p.m. to 3:45 p.m., the Carroll County Cloggers at 4 p.m. and the Stillwater Band from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. In keeping with the farm museum's 19th-century setting, old-fashioned games such as hoop rolling and jacks will be held for children from noon to 2 p.m., followed by competitive games such as sack races and a lemon relay race from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. For those who prefer more modern fun, a new Kids' Corner will be set up with bounce-and-play inflatables provided by Fun Events LLC of Taneytown.
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