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Sports Digest | July 5, 2013
Ravens Ray Lewis climbing Mount Kilimanjaro Retired Ravens inside linebacker Ray Lewis embarked Wednesday on a climb of Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest point in Africa at an elevation of 19,340 feet. Lewis is joined on the trip by Doug Pitt , the brother of actor Brad Pitt and a goodwill ambassador in Tanzania, and retired Pro Bowl Chicago Bears defensive lineman Tommie Harris . Lewis is raising money and awareness about the need for clean water in East Africa. The climb is scheduled to continue through Monday.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2014
KANSAS CITY, MO. -- The Orioles will attempt an unprecedented climb out of a 2-0 hole as the American League Championship Series shifts to Kauffman Stadium. It won't be easy because the Kansas City Royals are a team brimming with confidence. The Royals arrived home having won all six of their postseason games - pulling out two tightly-contested wins over the Orioles at Camden Yards with their share of late-inning hits and celebratory histrionics - to put the Orioles' season on the brink.
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NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 1998
HANGING 45 feet above the dark Laurel Caverns floor, Clay Fischer, from Boy Scout Troop 9, dangled by a rope looped through his rock-climbing harness.Below him, the red and white helmets of fellow Scouts looked like marbles. He could barely see Scott Laderer, his dad, Scott Laderer Sr.; Norman Ros and Robert Bulson; my son Adam, Derek Barnes, Matt Reiger and Patrick Welsh."Step off," called Lisa Hall, 42, a rappelling instructor.Clay's father, Randy Fischer, "belayed" the rope from below.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Two male teenagers who disappeared from the Elkton area under suspicious circumstances last week remain missing, and the FBI is now offering a $5,000 reward for tips in the search. The teens, 16-year-old Jesse Veasey Jr. and 19-year-old Ricardo Eugene Levenberry, were last seen Aug. 18 and Aug. 19, respectively, both in the Hollingsworth Manor neighborhood. Police have said both were seen willingly getting into the same Chevrolet vehicle and have not been heard from since. Lt. Joseph Zurolo, an Elkton police spokesman, said the occupants of the vehicle have been located and interviewed, but gave investigators "nothing to indicate any felonious activity.
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1995
Though Calvert Hall's premier harrier, Cory Smith, loves running over even the most treacherous terrain, he'd be just as happy hanging high above it."Being 300 feet up on a vertical cliff, looking out at the woods and down below, the view is great from up there," said Smith, who practices on the rock climbing wall in his attic about an hour a day and ascends cliff faces about twice a week."
FEATURES
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | June 17, 2006
Jason Weesner is halfway up the wall when he hesitates. He briefly glances down to check his foot position, then plots his next move. Grip after grip, he pushes and pulls himself to the top of the 28-foot edifice, pauses for a moment and yells "take!" -- the rock climber's jargon for "get me down!" After he is lowered down the wall, he unties the knot in his rope and rests. This is Weesner's first indoor-rock-climbing session -- an introductory class at Earth Treks Climbing Center in Timonium.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK | December 10, 2000
Washington's Arena Stage opened its 50th anniversary season with a revival of the first show it sent to Broadway, "The Great White Hope." Now it has re-mounted another Broadway transfer, Patrick Meyers' spine-chilling "K2," about a pair of climbers scaling the world's second-tallest mountain. Director Wendy C. Goldberg has reassembled the design team from Arena's 1982 production: set designer Ming Cho Lee, who won a Tony Award for his facsimile of the perilous peak; costume designer Noel Borden; and lighting designer Allen Lee Hughes.
NEWS
By Gary Davidson and Gary Davidson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 2003
It might not be Mount Everest or K2, but those with the urge to be upwardly mobile can find their thrills at Earth Treks' Climbing Center in Columbia. Conquering the world's most challenging peaks is the domain of Earth Treks owner Chris Warner, a renowned mountaineer and TV personality who is in Nepal, leading his third expedition on Everest, trying to reach the world's tallest summit for the second time. In Maryland, Kary Williams, director and membership co- ordinator, oversees a program he believes appeals to people of all ages, skill levels and physical condition.
NEWS
By Carol Sorgen and Carol Sorgen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 2000
Is your idea of a "regular" sport one where you have to actually stand on the ground? Well, that's not the way we feel! The sport Emily Goldberg, Rachel Kutler, and Anna Siegel are so excited about is indoor climbing. The three Columbia 12-year-olds have been passionate climbers for two years, and once a week you can find them scaling the heights at Columbia's indoor climbing gym, Earth Treks. The girls are so enthusiastic about climbing, they wrote an essay about it. Their piece is one of 15 about women in various sports in a new book titled, "Throw Like A Girl: Discovering the Body, Mind and Spirit of the Athlete in You!"
NEWS
By Carol Stocker and Carol Stocker,Boston Globe | June 22, 2003
Horticulturist Mary Ann McGourty has a slide program on vines that begins with a New Yorker cartoon of a wife standing at the front door while her husband is outside being chased around the house by a runaway vine. She's shouting, "Look out! Here it comes again!" Some vines are invasive and should never be planted. Still, many people like the space-saving attributes and vertical accent that vines can bring to a garden. The trick is to choose the right one. You have to balance your desire for something quick-growing (who likes to wait?
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
More families in the Baltimore region were trying to sell homes in July than any month since November 2011, but sales did not keep pace, according to a report published Monday. With 13,856 homes on the market, the number of active listings was up 22.5 percent in July compared to the same time last year, according to monthly data provided by RealEstate Business Intelligence, a subsidiary of the MRIS multiple listing service.   About 4,897 of the listings were new, representing the 16th consecutive month of year-over-year gains in new listing activity.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
The number of homes for sale in the Baltimore metro region climbed to the highest level in nearly three years last month, but closed sales failed to follow suit, a mismatch that reflects weakness in the housing market, analysts said. Sales in Baltimore City and the five surrounding counties dipped in July, falling 2 percent to 2,945, according to a monthly report published Monday. Meanwhile, the number of homes on the market rose 22.5 percent year-over-year, reaching 13,856 — more than any time since November 2011, according to the data provided by RealEstate Business Intelligence, a subsidiary of the MRIS multiple listing service.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
A familiar process plays out each time you see the descendant of a baseball legend in an obscure minor league ballpark. It's something both observers and the player himself have to deal with - the realization that he is not his namesake, then the understanding that such a standard is unfair and, finally, an appreciation for all the things the new generation does well. Orioles minor league outfielder Mike Yastrzemski, grandson of Boston Red Sox Hall of Famer Carl Yastrzemski, has dealt with it all, and now he is earning notice for more than just his name.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
When Orioles right fielder Nick Markakis slapped a single to left field in his first at-bat Friday night against the Cleveland Indians, he continued his climb up the franchise's all-time hit list. Markakis was by no means finished. He hit another single to left in his second at-bat off Indians left-hander T.J. House, passing Paul Blair for sole possession of eighth place on the Orioles' all-time list. When the night was complete, Markakis had his first four-hit game of the season.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
The Naval Academy is about molding military leaders, but when it comes to scaling a greased-up, 21-foot-tall obelisk, it takes teamwork. That's what propelled 19-year-old Midshipman Michael Landry to the top of a writhing human pyramid Monday. He topped the academy's Herndon Monument with a midshipman's hat after 2 hours, 19 minutes, and 35 seconds - a feat celebrated by his classmates with jumping, cheering and singing. "Plebes no more! Plebes no more!" members of the Class of 2017 chanted.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Nine workers were hospitalized Monday after the roof gave way on a building at the former steel mill in Sparrows Point, disrupting work on the lengthy dismantling of the Baltimore County industrial complex. Four of those hurt suffered serious to critical injuries, authorities said, and state regulators were on the scene investigating what went wrong. All 13 workers in the building that once housed the cold mill at the time of the accident were able to get out, demolition contractor MCM Management Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff | October 14, 1999
It's not the adrenalin rush that excites Brian Bovaird when he partakes in one of his favorite activities. Rather, it's that feeling of inner peace he loves. "For me, it's really meditational," says the 20-year-old Towson University student. Inner peace. Tranquillity. Serenity. These are not qualities that spring to mind when one thinks of rock climbing. "The perception is that it is real extreme," Bovaird says. "And, yes, there are some aspects that are. But it's the meditative part of it I love.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2004
At first glance, it doesn't look like a manmade mountain. With its cinderblock and metal exterior walls jutting upward from a wide concrete mound, Earth Treks' Timonium rock-climbing facility blends into the Baltimore region's compacted industrial landscape like a warehouse or plant. But the interior space is a wilder place altogether, offering vertical paths for thrill-seekers who want to escape - if only mentally - the bustle of the urban atmosphere. Thousands of locals, young and old, spend hours at the center practicing the physically and mentally challenging sport of rock climbing.
NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
After weeks without a jackpot, the Mega Millions prize has once again climbed to more than $400 million. The cash option for the multi-state lottery is $224.8 million, according the Maryland Lottery. The game is played in 43 states including Maryland and Washington, D.C. In October, the lottery adjusted its rules, which has contributed to the larger jackpots. The lottery now pulls from a pool of 75 white balls and 15 yellow or mega balls. The change has allowed for more lower tiered winners, but has made the top prize even harder to come by. Several Marylanders have won $1 million prizes in recent months.
SPORTS
By Matt Schnabel and The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
Gabe McKenzie swayed precariously, hanging from the rock wall by one hand. The 17-year-old let go, falling about 15 feet to the ground. Landing squarely on the mat below, he bounded to his feet and headed back toward another group of climbers for some pointers and his next practice assignment, another run successfully completed. McKenzie has participated in bouldering, a form of rock climbing performed without ropes and harnesses, since eighth grade and ranks sixth nationally in his age group.
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