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By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | December 9, 1994
Rock climbing has little to do with strength and everything to do with technique.Seventeen-year-old Nicholas Britz, of Laurel, is banking on that to turn a self-developed computer program into a big marketing hit. The Hammond High School senior's project employs complex math and scientific theories to show rock climbers how to position themselves more efficiently as they ascend cliffs.In essence, he's trying to turn the potentially dangerous, rugged and highly individualistic sport of rock climbing into a precise biomechanical science based on an analysis of the changes in torque, center of gravity, mass and force generated by climbers' bodies during ascents.
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NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2014
A Virginia rock climber was arrested on Jan. 8 after police accused him of killing a friend by striking him in the head with a claw hammer at a Maryland park in late December. David DiPaolo, 31, of Bristow, Va. faces a manslaughter charge in connection with the death of Geoffrey Farrar, 69, of Arlington, Va. U.S. Park Police said Farrar was found suffering major head trauma at around 2 p.m. Dec. 28 near a Potomac River tributary at the base of a rock face at the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historic Park in Bethesda.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 4, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - At least nine climbers were reported dead yesterday on K2, the world's second-highest mountain, after an avalanche struck them on a steep gully at a height of about 27,000 feet, just below the summit, mountaineering officials said. Those who died included South Koreans and Nepalese, the Pakistani television station ARY reported. Serbian, Norwegian, Dutch and French climbers were also near the summit, according to ARY. Other climbers are believed missing. The accident occurred when a chunk of an ice pillar snapped Friday, breaking fixed ropes on the area of the peak just below the summit, known as Bottleneck, according to expedition organizers.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | July 24, 2013
Outdoor apparel and equipment retailer The North Face will open a store in Towson Town Center on Friday.  The opening of a new, 6,217-square-foot store in the Towson mall continues the  Alameda, Calif.,-based chain's expansion into key markets. Shoppers who stop in this weekend can enter to win a $400 store shopping spree. North Face, a division of VF OutdoorInc., helps outfit climbers, mountaineers, snowsport athletes and endurance athletes, and sells its products at sporting good retailers as well as in its branded stores.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
Maryland mountaineer Chris Warner is already a seasoned adventurer. Next, he also might get to play one on TV. The Annapolis resident, who in 2001 conquered Mount Everest, the world's tallest mountain, is taking aim this summer at No. 2, the much deadlier K2. He set off this past week for the Pakistan-China border, and is expected to return in August. When he does, Warner hopes to play host for a new television series, Risk Takers/History Makers, that its producers aim to make part of the History Channel's lineup.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1997
Kent P. Swanson Jr., a 25-year-old mountain guide who grew up in Baltimore County and found his calling rescuing wayward skiers and climbers in the American West, was killed in a helicopter crash Jan. 11 in southwestern British Columbia.The chopper was taking him and other students to an avalanche rescue class when it crashed on Mount Higgins in the Purcell Mountains. All five people on board were killed.Services for Mr. Swanson will be held at 3 p.m. tomorrow at St. James Episcopal Church on Monkton Road in Monkton.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 14, 2006
GOVERNMENT CAMP, Ore. -- Wind gusts of up to 70 mph and blinding snow kept search-and-rescue teams about 4,000 feet below the last known location of three hikers missing near the summit of Oregon's Mount Hood yesterday, officials said. "Man and machine are at their limits there," said Capt. Christopher Bernard with the Air Force Reserve's 304th Rescue Squadron. The hazardous conditions kept search teams at about 7,000 feet, Bernard said, while signals from the cell phone of one of the missing men, Kelly James, 48, of Dallas, put his location in an ice cave a few hundred feet below the peak's 11,240-foot summit.
FEATURES
November 17, 1999
Bad weather kept climbers led by Maryland's Chris Warner from reaching the summit of Ama Dablam, a 22,584-foot peak in the Himalayas.The weekend attempt had an online audience: Maryland schoolchildren who kept in touch with the climbers via the Internet and e-mail through Shared Summits, a nonprofit educational program of Earth Treks, the climbing center in Columbia.Here is part of climber Jimmy Rockelman's report on Saturday's summit attempt, as filed on the Earth Treks Web site, earthtreks-climbing.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 18, 2006
SEATTLE --The body of a climber lost on Oregon's Mount Hood was found yesterday in a snow cave near the summit, a week after rescuers began an intense but frustrated search effort complicated by brutal storms that hammered the Pacific Northwest. The identity of the man was not immediately released, nor was it clear what had become of two fellow climbers who set out with him last weekend to climb the 11,235-foot peak, part of the Cascade Range. The last contact anyone had with the three climbers -- two men from Dallas and a third from Brooklyn, N.Y. -- was on Dec. 10. Kelly James, one of the Dallas residents, spoke to his wife by cell phone that day and told her that he was stranded but taking shelter in a snow cave near the summit.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | July 21, 2007
Under a cobalt-blue sky that seemed just beyond reach, Chris Warner placed his boots yesterday on the snow-encrusted summit of K2, the world's second-highest mountain, where few others have gone and that he had only pictured in his dreams. Just three days shy of his 43rd birthday, Warner, an Annapolis resident and owner of three Baltimore-area climbing gyms, became the first Marylander to stand atop both 28,253-foot K2 and Mount Everest, 782 feet higher. It took more than 15 hours for Warner and more than a dozen other climbers to cover the 1,850 vertical feet from Camp 4 to the summit, plowing through chest-deep snow, picking their way across ancient ice slabs and hauling themselves up slopes that reached an 80-degree pitch.
FEATURES
By Buzz McClain, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
El Capitan is an intimidating granite formation in California's Yosemite National Park, popular with climbers because its 7,573-foot vertical face presents such a challenge. Pete Davis has done the four-night, five-day ascent twice, which is an accomplishment in itself. And he did it with one hand. The native of Phoenix in Baltimore County was born without an arm below the elbow, but as he shows in the short climbing film "The Gimp Monkeys," he'd rather have "one hand and a good attitude" than two hands and a bad outlook.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
Ian Yarmus can spot them when he goes down to his favorite indoor climbing gym in Rockville or when he travels to Seneca Rocks in West Virginia, the place after which he named his now 3--year-old daughter. "I remember being 100 feet up [at Seneca], and there was a guy up there who was freaking out, he was completely paralyzed with fear," Yarmus recalled. "He was in over his head. He didn't have the skills or the training to be in the situation he was in. I had to tell him everything to do, tell him where to put every piece of equipment and what part of his body to use and where to put it in the rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2011
From : California Pice : $14 Serve with : Red meat, pasta This imaginitive California blend delivers excellent value at an attractive price. It's a medium-bodied red wiith gripping flavors of blackberry, blueberry and herbs — not complex but very satisyfing. It's not meant for extended cellaring so the use of a screwcap shows wisdom on the part of the winery.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | February 5, 2010
I 'm at that stage in my life where I really don't care about stuff like leadership, productivity and adding value. Sure, 10 years ago, I read "Getting to Yes," "The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People" and "In Search of Excellence." I even skimmed "The One-Minute Manager" because that seemed apt. But now I don't aspire to build consensus, be efficient and achieve unparalleled success in the process. I just want to do the right thing. And I don't care if you follow me or not. I guess what I'm saying is: Go ahead and move my cheese all you want - as long as you don't eat it, because I love cheese, particularly Havarti and Gorgonzola.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 4, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - At least nine climbers were reported dead yesterday on K2, the world's second-highest mountain, after an avalanche struck them on a steep gully at a height of about 27,000 feet, just below the summit, mountaineering officials said. Those who died included South Koreans and Nepalese, the Pakistani television station ARY reported. Serbian, Norwegian, Dutch and French climbers were also near the summit, according to ARY. Other climbers are believed missing. The accident occurred when a chunk of an ice pillar snapped Friday, breaking fixed ropes on the area of the peak just below the summit, known as Bottleneck, according to expedition organizers.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 16, 2007
Last summer, Annapolis resident Chris Warner stood atop the world's nastiest rock pile. But even he couldn't tell me how today's NBC show about the expedition is going to end. When we talked Tuesday, the show about conquering K2, aka the "Savage Mountain," was still in final editing, with Warner on his way to New York to do some last-minute voiceovers. Chopping down more than 30 hours of high-definition video into 38 minutes of action - that's what's left after commercials and studio chatter - was an uphill battle.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2000
Everest has taken his dream, but it did not take his life. Chris Warner, who spent 20 years preparing to conquer the world's highest mountain, is on his way home to Maryland today without experiencing the thrill of standing on top of the world. After huddling for 18 hours at 25,000 feet in tiny tents being shaken apart by high winds and driving snow, Warner and seven other members of the party were ordered down Wednesday by expedition leader Russell Brice. They are believed to be the last team off the mountain this season.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2000
Chris Warner did not reach the top of the world, but the third-graders who greeted him at Elkridge Elementary School yesterday seemed no less impressed with stories of blizzards, avalanches and survival on Mount Everest. The children, who had followed the Oella climber's progress through e-mail dispatches during the past several months, cheered his return. Sitting cross-legged in the school's library, they watched Warner's video of the exhausted climbers staggering up a snow-covered slope, eagerly tried on his gear and listened intently as Warner told of the heartbreak of failing to reach his goal.
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