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NEWS
June 21, 2012
Leslie Starr of Baltimore complains about your paper's misuse of the word "crescendo" regarding the performance of the Blue Angels, during Sailabration ("A crescendo of complaint over a misused word," June 20). The writer takes particular offense because you did this in a headline and writes that crescendo is a process by which a peak is reached and you should have called the performance of the Blue Angels a climax. Wrong. Crescendo is indeed a process by which a peak is reached and if that's all it is your headline would be erroneous.
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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | November 15, 2012
Breaking Dawn Part 2, the final Twilight movie -- and the climax of Stephenie Meyer's best-selling series -- is sure to delight loyal fans. But critics aren't so kind, giving the movie reviews of the single-star variety for weak acting, poor special effects and a thin plot. (I also find it annoying and crass that the finale was split into two parts to suck more money from viewers. But that may just be me.) Here are excerpts from some reviews: -- Tribune: Director Bill Condon, who handled "Breaking Dawn - Part 1" with a modicum of sly camp, returns here, arranging everyone in the group scenes like eerie poseurs in a particularly smug fashion shoot.
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NEWS
June 4, 2006
ISSUE: A week from today, the McDonald's LPGA Championship will reach its climax (barring rain) and a champion will be crowned at Bulle Rock golf course in Havre de Grace. YOUR VIEW: Will the big winner be: Annika Sorenstam? Michelle Wie? The local economy? The county's reputation as a suitable host for major events? Tell us what you think. Send e-mail responses by Thursday to harford.speakout@baltsun.com. A selection of responses will be published next Sunday. Please keep your responses short and include your name, address and telephone number.
NEWS
June 21, 2012
Leslie Starr of Baltimore complains about your paper's misuse of the word "crescendo" regarding the performance of the Blue Angels, during Sailabration ("A crescendo of complaint over a misused word," June 20). The writer takes particular offense because you did this in a headline and writes that crescendo is a process by which a peak is reached and you should have called the performance of the Blue Angels a climax. Wrong. Crescendo is indeed a process by which a peak is reached and if that's all it is your headline would be erroneous.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter | May 13, 1996
"Hard-Boiled" was John Woo's last Hong Kong film before he decided to go American (as in the hit "Broken Arrow"), and he evidently decided to go out with a bang. Or several million bangs.The movie, surely one of the most intense visions ever hTC committed to film, shows tonight at 7: 15 at the Charles as part of that theater's neat series of Hong Kong cinema. In this one, Woo's great star Chow Yun-Fat plays a cop named Tequila in a hunt for gunrunners.I can think of no other movie with this kind of crazy off-the-wall outlaw violence.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | November 15, 2012
Breaking Dawn Part 2, the final Twilight movie -- and the climax of Stephenie Meyer's best-selling series -- is sure to delight loyal fans. But critics aren't so kind, giving the movie reviews of the single-star variety for weak acting, poor special effects and a thin plot. (I also find it annoying and crass that the finale was split into two parts to suck more money from viewers. But that may just be me.) Here are excerpts from some reviews: -- Tribune: Director Bill Condon, who handled "Breaking Dawn - Part 1" with a modicum of sly camp, returns here, arranging everyone in the group scenes like eerie poseurs in a particularly smug fashion shoot.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | January 9, 1992
INSPIRED by the success of the inaugural 1990 Chutzpah Awards (I deeply appreciate the touching letters I received from the Wyoming State Hospital for the Criminally Insane), I have decided to continue the tradition and hand out awards for 1991.Without further ado, let's get right to the deserving winners:* Special "Say What?" Chutzpah Award: Every now and then along comes a comment so egregious that the listener is compelled to utter, "Say what?" The winners in this category are those who opposed the concept of all-male schools for black boys because they would "reinforce segregation."
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2005
From the stage Saturday night, the Music Center at Strathmore seemed to soar ever upward with balconies. The full-house crowd, which had come to see the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra open the new facility in North Bethesda, offered glitter, flamboyance, fashion. Cellist Colin Stokes was pretty fancy himself: The evening called for white tie and tails -- a decided departure for a teenager whose trademark fashion is a colorful belt from Honduras. Saturday night, the 17-year-old Baltimore School for the Arts student performed with the legendary Yo-Yo Ma, soprano Janice Chandler-Eteme and six other cellists.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
The workmen who built the Great Wall of China ate it for strength. Sailors on early American clipper ships consumed it for health during long voyages. It has tickled Teutonic taste buds and made its way across France, England and the New World. It has never lost its in-your-face pungency, its low-calorie, high-vitamin profile - or, in modern times, its capacity to tease just the right flavors from a hot dog or Reuben sandwich. It's sauerkraut, that tartly tantalizing fermented-cabbage dish that long ago took its oddball place alongside gravy and sweet potatoes as a staple of Baltimore Thanksgiving dinners.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and JoAnna Daemmrich and Eric Siegel and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writers | September 2, 1995
In the final, frantic days before Baltimore's Sept. 12 Democratic mayoral primary, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and rival Mary Pat Clarke are attacking each other's record -- and trading accusations of distorting the facts.The two clashed repeatedly during a television debate Thursday night, with Mr. Schmoke charging that the City Council President "uses false numbers" and "continues to mislead people." Mrs. Clarke shot back that, "It's time for Kurt Schmoke to stop distorting my record and his own."
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | March 7, 2010
The nearly year-old H1N1 influenza pandemic that disproportionately affected children and mobilized millions to line up for vaccination seems to have finally abated, and officials estimate that it has killed fewer people than die even in a typical flu season. Public health officials remain cautious and say another wave of this novel and unpredictable virus could surface before the season's typical end in May, or even after. They are still recommending vaccine for people who haven't received inoculations against the virus.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | May 30, 2009
It was 4 a.m. Thursday and Theresa Stoop - the special agent in charge of Baltimore's ATF division - was standing in M&T Bank Stadium with a microphone in hand, looking at about 340 agents and officers sitting in the seats before her. A core group of them, along with attorneys from the state and federal prosecutors' offices, had spent the past 17 months investigating dozens of suspected city gang members, considered a violent organization of Bloods, and...
NEWS
June 4, 2006
ISSUE: A week from today, the McDonald's LPGA Championship will reach its climax (barring rain) and a champion will be crowned at Bulle Rock golf course in Havre de Grace. YOUR VIEW: Will the big winner be: Annika Sorenstam? Michelle Wie? The local economy? The county's reputation as a suitable host for major events? Tell us what you think. Send e-mail responses by Thursday to harford.speakout@baltsun.com. A selection of responses will be published next Sunday. Please keep your responses short and include your name, address and telephone number.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2005
From the stage Saturday night, the Music Center at Strathmore seemed to soar ever upward with balconies. The full-house crowd, which had come to see the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra open the new facility in North Bethesda, offered glitter, flamboyance, fashion. Cellist Colin Stokes was pretty fancy himself: The evening called for white tie and tails -- a decided departure for a teenager whose trademark fashion is a colorful belt from Honduras. Saturday night, the 17-year-old Baltimore School for the Arts student performed with the legendary Yo-Yo Ma, soprano Janice Chandler-Eteme and six other cellists.
NEWS
August 2, 1999
THE FINE levied on President Clinton by federal District Judge Susan Webber Wright in Little Rock, Ark., and the indictment of Linda Tripp by the Howard Country grand jury, treat those two as ordinary Americans subject to the same laws as everyone else.There was a lot of sound and fury to get there, but it is the proper destination.Judge Wright's assessment of $89,484.05 on President Clinton was tying up a loose end.Her basic finding was a civil contempt order last April, holding that Mr. Clinton had given "false, misleading and evasive answers that were designed to obstruct the judicial process."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1999
One of the most mysterious of all nature's rhythms -- the 11-year rise and fall of solar activity -- is rising toward a violent climax, and scientists say society has never been more vulnerable.Since the last "solar maximum" in 1989, the networks of high-technology communications and satellites have expanded like condos on the beach -- smack in the path of the coming solar "storms."Space station astronauts will be working in harm's way. And electric utilities are more reliant on cross-country transmission lines that can behave something like Ben Franklin's kites during big solar events.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 13, 1994
A vacation nightmare: On a hot and humid July day at a large state park in Pennsylvania, children and their parents frolic in the cooling waters of a man-made lake. Within a few minutes, purple storm clouds gather and drift across a mountain range and over the valley in which the seven-mile lake sits. Thunder is heard. Authorities, using a public-address system, order everyone out of the water. Everyone follows orders. Men, women, boys and girls return to blankets and picnic tables, to the sprawling lawns near the lake.
NEWS
By Rebecca W. Boylan | August 18, 1991
OUTER BANKS.Anne Rivers Siddons.HarperCollins.400 pages. $19.95."Outer Banks" spins the reader through a kaleidoscope of places: Alabama, Virginia, Long Island, Cape Cod and North Carolina's Outer Banks. Time also travels as the main character, Kate Abrams, moves through childhood (rapidly) into her college years (more lingeringly), then into her married years as 'u successful interior designer and mother, and finally into the climactic reunion of her suitemates more than 25 years after their graduation.
NEWS
February 9, 1999
THE PEOPLE need to know how their senators vote on the proposed removal of President Clinton from office, and why. Senators are not mere jurors but judges. The verdict is the most public part of a trial that must be wholly transparent.The secrecy imposed in 1868 on the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson was unprecedented then, and does not bind senators today.Should the conclusion of the current trial be kept secret -- and then subject to leaks -- the Senate would join the House of Representatives in travesty.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1998
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Orioles general manager Frank Wren arrives today at the Opryland Hotel, a place so immense that guests are given maps at check-in to avoid becoming hopelessly lost. Wren might need one just to get through the next 72 hours.Having last week shown himself capable of improvisation, Wren will try to use baseball's winter meetings here as a stage for improving the club's tattered bullpen and an unbalanced bench, as well as for pushing to make free-agent pitcher Kevin Brown the game's highest-paid player -- perhaps its first $100 million player.
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