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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2012
The weather page in The Sun's Sunday print edition warned of a wet long-term forecast for Labor Day weekend and the Grand Prix of Baltimore. As the weekend nears, though, the weather is looking dry -- and hot. The National Weather Service is forecasting partly to mostly cloudy skies and highs in the mid- to upper-80s for Friday, Saturday and Sunday. AccuWeather.com is forecasting highs of 90 degrees Friday and Saturday and 86 on Monday. The biggest chance of rain appears to be on Monday, with about a 40 percent chance of precipitation, according to the Climate Prediction Center.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Climate forecasters still expect El Nino to develop this fall or winter, but the chances have fallen to about two in three. The National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center in College Park on Thursday upheld the El Niño watch it began in March. Temperatures in the eastern Pacific Ocean along the equator continue to be warmer than normal, a key El Niño indicator. However, most of the benchmarks climate scientists use to track and predict El Niño waned somewhat in July.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
The likelihood of El Nino strengthening this fall and winter fell from about 70 percent to 55 percent in a climate forecast released Thursday. While some indicators show the climate phenomenon has been developing in recent months, others favor more neutral conditions, or at least a weaker El Nino than was previously expected.NOAA's Climate Prediction Center  detailed the forecast in a monthly update  that extends an El Nino watch that has...
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
The National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center on Thursday placed the globe on El Niño watch, with a 50 percent chance of the global climate pattern developing by summer or fall. El Nino is characterized by above-average Pacific Ocean surface temperatures along the equator, just west of South America. It can cause climate patterns that contribute to extreme weather around the world, with some areas prone to drought or others to flooding, for example. In Maryland and the Northeast, El Niño is perhaps best known for bringing snowy winters -- though that's not required, as this snowy winter occurred under what are considered "neutral" conditions, with neither El Niño or La Niña present.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | October 16, 2009
If you're a Marylander and you love snow, you'll want to listen to AccuWeather.com's chief meteorologist, Joe Bastardi. If he's right, Maryland is in for the coldest, snowiest winter we've seen since the memorable - and snow-choked - winter of 2002-2003. But if you can barely tolerate the slippery, icy, sloppy stuff, maybe the winter forecast from the National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center will sound better to you. Its forecasters expect a colder-than-average winter in the Mid-Atlantic states, but they're less confident about whether whatever falls from the sky will be snow or rain.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 13, 2012
Severe weather has quieted, so there's not much else for meteorologists to chat about but a few guessing games. And AccuWeather severe weather blogger Henry Margusity's hunch is that there is a link between this month's heat waves across the U.S. and the climatic phenomenon known as the North Atlantic Oscillation. The NAO, which measures the atmospheric pressure difference between the typical low pressure system near Iceland and high pressure south of the Azores, hit its lowest point since 1950 in June, an AccuWeather reader pointed out to Margusity.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 13, 2012
The likelihood of El Nino is increasing, with onset of the climate phenomenon known for snowy winters in these parts expected by fall.  There is "increased confidence" in a weak to moderate El Nino, according to the Climate Prediction Center. Forecasters included the information in an update to the hurricane season outlook issued last week, saying it could impact those storms by late in the season. They expect onset of El Nino by the end of September, though there could be a weeks-long delay in its effects reaching the Atlantic.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
The National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center on Thursday placed the globe on El Niño watch, with a 50 percent chance of the global climate pattern developing by summer or fall. El Nino is characterized by above-average Pacific Ocean surface temperatures along the equator, just west of South America. It can cause climate patterns that contribute to extreme weather around the world, with some areas prone to drought or others to flooding, for example. In Maryland and the Northeast, El Niño is perhaps best known for bringing snowy winters -- though that's not required, as this snowy winter occurred under what are considered "neutral" conditions, with neither El Niño or La Niña present.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2013
Humidity has been at fall-like levels at the start of this week in the Baltimore area and much of the East, and while it could creep up starting Wednesday, an overall cooler weather pattern is forecast to carry into the first half of August. Dew points were hovering around 50 degrees for a second straight day in Baltimore on Tuesday -- a level more common in September or October. Dew points factor in both temperature and humidity levels, and typically sit in the mid-60s or higher during summer in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Climate forecasters still expect El Nino to develop this fall or winter, but the chances have fallen to about two in three. The National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center in College Park on Thursday upheld the El Niño watch it began in March. Temperatures in the eastern Pacific Ocean along the equator continue to be warmer than normal, a key El Niño indicator. However, most of the benchmarks climate scientists use to track and predict El Niño waned somewhat in July.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2013
Humidity has been at fall-like levels at the start of this week in the Baltimore area and much of the East, and while it could creep up starting Wednesday, an overall cooler weather pattern is forecast to carry into the first half of August. Dew points were hovering around 50 degrees for a second straight day in Baltimore on Tuesday -- a level more common in September or October. Dew points factor in both temperature and humidity levels, and typically sit in the mid-60s or higher during summer in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
The likelihood of El Nino strengthening this fall and winter fell from about 70 percent to 55 percent in a climate forecast released Thursday. While some indicators show the climate phenomenon has been developing in recent months, others favor more neutral conditions, or at least a weaker El Nino than was previously expected.NOAA's Climate Prediction Center  detailed the forecast in a monthly update  that extends an El Nino watch that has...
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2012
The weather page in The Sun's Sunday print edition warned of a wet long-term forecast for Labor Day weekend and the Grand Prix of Baltimore. As the weekend nears, though, the weather is looking dry -- and hot. The National Weather Service is forecasting partly to mostly cloudy skies and highs in the mid- to upper-80s for Friday, Saturday and Sunday. AccuWeather.com is forecasting highs of 90 degrees Friday and Saturday and 86 on Monday. The biggest chance of rain appears to be on Monday, with about a 40 percent chance of precipitation, according to the Climate Prediction Center.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 13, 2012
The likelihood of El Nino is increasing, with onset of the climate phenomenon known for snowy winters in these parts expected by fall.  There is "increased confidence" in a weak to moderate El Nino, according to the Climate Prediction Center. Forecasters included the information in an update to the hurricane season outlook issued last week, saying it could impact those storms by late in the season. They expect onset of El Nino by the end of September, though there could be a weeks-long delay in its effects reaching the Atlantic.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 13, 2012
Severe weather has quieted, so there's not much else for meteorologists to chat about but a few guessing games. And AccuWeather severe weather blogger Henry Margusity's hunch is that there is a link between this month's heat waves across the U.S. and the climatic phenomenon known as the North Atlantic Oscillation. The NAO, which measures the atmospheric pressure difference between the typical low pressure system near Iceland and high pressure south of the Azores, hit its lowest point since 1950 in June, an AccuWeather reader pointed out to Margusity.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | October 16, 2009
If you're a Marylander and you love snow, you'll want to listen to AccuWeather.com's chief meteorologist, Joe Bastardi. If he's right, Maryland is in for the coldest, snowiest winter we've seen since the memorable - and snow-choked - winter of 2002-2003. But if you can barely tolerate the slippery, icy, sloppy stuff, maybe the winter forecast from the National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center will sound better to you. Its forecasters expect a colder-than-average winter in the Mid-Atlantic states, but they're less confident about whether whatever falls from the sky will be snow or rain.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | November 21, 2008
The U.S. Climate Prediction Center has issued its winter outlook for Decmeber through February. The Central Plains are in line for warmer and wetter winter weather than the average. But there are no signss in the tea leaves for Maryland. Still, even an "average" winter here would mean a colder winter than we've seen since 2003, and as much snow as the past two winters combined. Got your shovel?
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