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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Teachers in Maryland are about to get new help and encouragement to talk about the touchy topic of global warming in their classrooms. The National Science Foundation announced Wednesday that it is awarding $5.8 million for improving climate-change education in Maryland and Delaware through a partnership including universities and school systems from both states. The two-state initiative is one of six such education projects the foundation is funding across the country and in the nation's Pacific island territories.
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NEWS
April 11, 2014
In his ardent defense of the natural gas industry, letter writer Robert C. Erlandson worries that "economic progress" - by which he means the Cove Point LNG project - may be stifled by "environmental zealots" ("Study LNG exports but decide soon" April 7). Clearly Mr. Erlandson is unworried by any long-term negative environmental impact the facility may have. Yet American and international businesses are spending huge sums of money to buy up vast territories around and above the Arctic circle to exploit the region's oil and mineral deposits when global warming melts enough of the ice cap to permit full-scale operations.
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NEWS
December 16, 2011
The climate-transformed planet of 2100 offers, as Mike Tidwell states, little reason for optimism ("The hottest issue," Dec. 15). Further gloom is warranted by the fact that a plurality of Americans have been egregiously misled by the industry-fueled message of triumphant consumerism and climate-change denial prevalent in our media. In the fantasy land inhabited by conservative denialists, the notion of climate change as a liberal conspiracy to enact a one-world government (forced re-education camps for SUV owners!
NEWS
April 4, 2014
In his commentary, Joe Uehlein makes some dire predictions about ecological conditions in the future ( "Climate change threatens economy," April 2). He writes that flooding and coastal erosion will have an impact on port operations. He states the rising sea levels will have a catastrophic effect on the lower Eastern Shore. But the one that really grabbed my attention is this: "By 2050, days hotter than 90 degrees Fahrenheit will triple to 90 days a year. Between 25 and 30 days will be above 100 degrees.
NEWS
December 4, 2009
The pace at which the world's glaciers are melting can't hold a candle to the rate at which public acceptance of climate change is losing ground. Two years ago, about 7 out of 10 Americans linked greenhouse gases to global warming, but today it's closer to a 50-50 split. There are any number of reasons for this, ranging from the "inconvenience" of climate change policy during an economic recession to the growing partisan divide over the science of it. The fact that Republicans willingly nominated a presidential candidate in 2008 whose position on climate change and the need to reduce carbon emissions was not much different from his Democratic opponent's seems largely forgotten today.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | June 24, 2009
Warning that the water is rising in the Chesapeake Bay, scientists and activists urged Tuesday that Congress act to reduce climate-warming pollution that threatens to flood bayfront communities and worsen the fish-suffocating "dead zones" that plague North America's largest estuary. With a House vote possible Friday on a bill that would seek to curtail greenhouse gas emissions nationwide, two natural resources subcommittees held a field hearing Tuesday at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater to learn more about what global warming might mean for coastal regions like the Chesapeake.
NEWS
By Faye Fiore and Richard Simon and Faye Fiore and Richard Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 22, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The doors swung open and he made his entrance as cameras clicked. The man who was called a wooden politician, was denied the presidency and was derided as "Ozone Man" was coming home to the Capitol. But this time they called him a movie star and likened him to a prophet. Al Gore left Washington seven years ago after the disputed 2000 election. He returned yesterday as the subject of an Academy Award-winning film, a nominee for the Nobel Peace Prize, a 58-year-old who can share a stage with Leonardo DiCaprio and manage to be the center of attention.
NEWS
June 25, 2013
The fight against climate change must be local, global and immediate. The clear and increasingly imminent threat should be of concern to everyone on the planet but especially to those who live near oceans and bays due to their vulnerability to rising water levels ("Climate change warnings," June 12). In spite of overwhelming scientific evidence, there are still politicians who, for reasons of ideology and special interests, deny the facts and science. House Speaker John Boehner, for example, dismisses the looming danger as "absolutely crazy.
NEWS
February 11, 2013
Kudos to Mike Tidwell for his clear commentary explaining why we need a revenue-neutral carbon tax to reduce emissions and slow climate change ("Forecast calls for pain," Feb. 6). I'm convinced, but how are the American people going to convince Congress to pass such a tax? Readers should go to Washington, D.C. on Feb. 17 for a noon rally and march assembling on the mall near the Washington Monument. The goal of the march is to let President Barack Obama know we have his back on his plans to impose more EPA regulations, to deny permission to build the Keystone XL pipeline, and whatever other environmental orders he chooses to issue with his executive authority.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
The Sun's recent reader poll ("What Maryland thinks," July 10) shows that a majority of those responding to this "not scientific" survey doubt that man made climate changes contributed to recent weather extremes. As one who holds an advanced degree in science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, I disagree. If you had polled only accredited scientists, I wager about 99 percent would have stated that global warming, in fact, has contributed to recent weather events. In the scientific community, this has become the accepted and undisputed position for years and is a position adopted by the National Academy of Sciences.
NEWS
April 4, 2014
The Sun recently had a fantastic mix of articles. U.S. Rep. Steny Hoyer fears that giant wind turbines proposed in Somerset County could jeopardize the future of Naval Air Station Patuxent River, an economic engine for the state ( "Hoyer, O'Malley at odds over Shore wind project," April 2). Man-made greenhouse gas emissions are the main reason global warming is getting worse. Such emissions can be stuck in the atmosphere for centuries ( "The heat is on," April 2). Rising sea-levels and extreme weather events due to global warming threaten the port of Baltimore in terms of jobs, docking, flooding, coastal erosion.
NEWS
By Joe Uehlein | April 1, 2014
If you work in Maryland, you have good reason to be concerned about climate change and to be in favor of more clean energy like land-based wind power. Unfortunately, a bill moving in Annapolis right now would severely handicap Maryland's ability to pursue onshore wind development within our borders. My organization, the Labor Network for Sustainability, recently released a report called "The Impact of Climate Change on Work and Working People in Maryland. " The report shines a bright light on specific sectors of Maryland's economy and how climate change threatens each one. Let's consider a few of those sectors.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
Rising sea levels and more severe weather may be the two effects of climate change that have gotten the most press, but as the latest report from the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change makes clear, the impact will be far more widespread and disastrous, and the world remains ill-prepared to deal with that new reality. That's not to downplay what impact coastal flooding and more powerful storms or worsened droughts will have on the world; they are potentially disastrous.
NEWS
By Cheryl Casciani | March 14, 2014
So, how about this weather? This question is often just small talk, but conversation about the recent weather has not been simple idle chatter. While Baltimore was bundled up against the frigid "polar vortex," Alaska saw record high temperatures. While Atlanta was virtually shut down in an unusual winter storm, California experienced a severe drought. Scientists predict climate change will mean more extreme weather - longer droughts, bigger storms and more extreme hot and cold temperatures.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | March 5, 2014
How can Baltimoreans "strive for environmental justice for all citizens, particularly in the face of climate change?" That's one of the central questions to be tackled Thursday evening at a forum put on by the Friends of Maryland's Olmsted Parks & Landscapes .  A panel of three speakers will address "the Olmsted Challenge: Fostering Environmental Justice for a More Humane City. " Scheduled speakers are: Scot Spencer of the Annie E. Casey Foundation; Kristin Baja of the city's Office of Sustainability and Morgan Grove, a research scientist with the U.S. Forest Service.
NEWS
February 25, 2014
It came as no surprise to hear that certain U.S. Supreme Court justices hold misgivings about the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulating greenhouse gas emissions from power plants - and potentially other stationary sources. In arguments before the court Monday, it was apparent that even some of the liberal justices have doubts about how far the EPA's statutory authority can be pushed in this regard. But one thing was also clear, at least if one can draw conclusions based on the questions presented to the lawyers arguing Utility Air Regulatory Group v. EPA: A majority of the court appears content to let stand its 2007 ruling in Massachusetts v. EPA that held that the agency can consider carbon dioxide a pollutant despite its ubiquity.
NEWS
October 14, 2013
For the average person, it is sometimes difficult to appreciate the depth and breadth of the threat represented by climate change. Flip around the cable TV channels, and it's not hard to find completely contradictory views of the issue. And at a time when Washington seems unable to handle its most basic fiduciary chores, the possibility that lawmakers might seriously address this long-term global threat seems unlikely at best. But if Americans are to truly understand what's happening to the planet and what it might mean for them, a good starting point would be to consider the most authoritative and comprehensive review of scientific evidence currently available.
NEWS
By David Horsey | February 18, 2014
With the American South thawing out after a deep freeze, you can be sure that plenty of the folks are interpreting the big chill as more proof that global warming is a hoax. "Warming?" they scoff. "How can the planet be warming when it's so darn cold?" People in other parts of the world seem to have no great difficulty understanding the science, but in the good old USA, where quite a few people consider science just another political opinion, it is going to take a lot longer to get most people to accept the cold facts about a warmer world.
NEWS
February 12, 2014
I'm so glad the Obama administration is developing support mechanisms to help the livestock industry adjust to the impacts of climate change ("U.S. sets up 10 'climate hubs' to assist farmers, ranchers," Feb 6). Since the industry is among the largest sources of greenhouse gases, it's only appropriate the government establish a support program to help them with their addiction, right? Next, shall we also establish a burn healing center for arsonists? How about a road rash support group for dirt bike gangs?
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