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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Teachers in Maryland are about to get new help and encouragement to talk about the touchy topic of global warming in their classrooms. The National Science Foundation announced Wednesday that it is awarding $5.8 million for improving climate-change education in Maryland and Delaware through a partnership including universities and school systems from both states. The two-state initiative is one of six such education projects the foundation is funding across the country and in the nation's Pacific island territories.
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NEWS
By Peter Morici | July 1, 2014
Economists should be bound by facts and reason. I simply can't embrace liberal positions on the minimum wage, climate change and gender discrimination, and call myself a scientist. Let's take them one by one: The minimum wage: The Congressional Budget Office estimates that raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, as President Obama proposes, would eliminate 500,000 to 1,000,000 jobs. Businesses will be forced to raise prices, thereby reducing purchases (If beef or a plumber's visit gets too high, folks eat more chicken and fix their own faucets)
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NEWS
December 16, 2011
The climate-transformed planet of 2100 offers, as Mike Tidwell states, little reason for optimism ("The hottest issue," Dec. 15). Further gloom is warranted by the fact that a plurality of Americans have been egregiously misled by the industry-fueled message of triumphant consumerism and climate-change denial prevalent in our media. In the fantasy land inhabited by conservative denialists, the notion of climate change as a liberal conspiracy to enact a one-world government (forced re-education camps for SUV owners!
NEWS
June 28, 2014
The Sun's recent editorial on climate change ( "The economic climate," June 24) looks like it was written by a student at the Community College of Baltimore County taking Obamanomics 101 - and should have received a "C. " Where is mention of what the impact is of natural climate change (if you read this with an IQ of less than 50, you would think the U.S. had never had a drought, flood, hurricane, tornado or even a thunderstorm prior to 10 years...
NEWS
December 4, 2009
T he pace at which the world's glaciers are melting can't hold a candle to the rate at which public acceptance of climate change is losing ground. Two years ago, about 7 out of 10 Americans linked greenhouse gases to global warming, but today it's closer to a 50-50 split. There are any number of reasons for this, ranging from the "inconvenience" of climate change policy during an economic recession to the growing partisan divide over the science of it. The fact that Republicans willingly nominated a presidential candidate in 2008 whose position on climate change and the need to reduce carbon emissions was not much different from his Democratic opponent's seems largely forgotten today.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | June 24, 2009
Warning that the water is rising in the Chesapeake Bay, scientists and activists urged Tuesday that Congress act to reduce climate-warming pollution that threatens to flood bayfront communities and worsen the fish-suffocating "dead zones" that plague North America's largest estuary. With a House vote possible Friday on a bill that would seek to curtail greenhouse gas emissions nationwide, two natural resources subcommittees held a field hearing Tuesday at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater to learn more about what global warming might mean for coastal regions like the Chesapeake.
NEWS
By Faye Fiore and Richard Simon and Faye Fiore and Richard Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 22, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The doors swung open and he made his entrance as cameras clicked. The man who was called a wooden politician, was denied the presidency and was derided as "Ozone Man" was coming home to the Capitol. But this time they called him a movie star and likened him to a prophet. Al Gore left Washington seven years ago after the disputed 2000 election. He returned yesterday as the subject of an Academy Award-winning film, a nominee for the Nobel Peace Prize, a 58-year-old who can share a stage with Leonardo DiCaprio and manage to be the center of attention.
NEWS
June 25, 2013
The fight against climate change must be local, global and immediate. The clear and increasingly imminent threat should be of concern to everyone on the planet but especially to those who live near oceans and bays due to their vulnerability to rising water levels ("Climate change warnings," June 12). In spite of overwhelming scientific evidence, there are still politicians who, for reasons of ideology and special interests, deny the facts and science. House Speaker John Boehner, for example, dismisses the looming danger as "absolutely crazy.
NEWS
February 11, 2013
Kudos to Mike Tidwell for his clear commentary explaining why we need a revenue-neutral carbon tax to reduce emissions and slow climate change ("Forecast calls for pain," Feb. 6). I'm convinced, but how are the American people going to convince Congress to pass such a tax? Readers should go to Washington, D.C. on Feb. 17 for a noon rally and march assembling on the mall near the Washington Monument. The goal of the march is to let President Barack Obama know we have his back on his plans to impose more EPA regulations, to deny permission to build the Keystone XL pipeline, and whatever other environmental orders he chooses to issue with his executive authority.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
The Sun's recent reader poll ("What Maryland thinks," July 10) shows that a majority of those responding to this "not scientific" survey doubt that man made climate changes contributed to recent weather extremes. As one who holds an advanced degree in science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, I disagree. If you had polled only accredited scientists, I wager about 99 percent would have stated that global warming, in fact, has contributed to recent weather events. In the scientific community, this has become the accepted and undisputed position for years and is a position adopted by the National Academy of Sciences.
NEWS
June 27, 2014
Regarding your recent editorial on the impact of climate change on the economy, I agree that resolving the issue of climate change would not be an economic failure but rather a success ( "The economic climate ," June 24). Aside from the fact that if climate change is ignored the situation of the economy will become an issue of infinitely less importance than the condition of our planet, exploring solutions to the problem will open many opportunities to improve the economy. At current rates of consumption, there is an estimated 50 years of oil left in Earth's crust.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 26, 2014
The signs were all there. This is what jumps out at you in perusing postmortems of the two greatest surprise attacks in American history. In the days and weeks leading up to Dec. 7, 1941 and Sept. 11, 2001, there were numerous clues that seem neon in hindsight, but which no one pursued. Or, as then-CIA Director George Tenet famously said of 9/11: "The system was blinking red. " In response to each attack, exhaustive probes were launched to determine whose incompetence allowed the disaster to happen.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 22, 2014
The signs were all there. This is what jumps out at you in perusing postmortems of the two greatest surprise attacks in American history. In the days and weeks leading up to Dec. 7, 1941 and Sept. 11, 2001, there were numerous clues that seem neon in hindsight, but which no one pursued. Or, as then-CIA Director George Tenet famously said of 9/11: "The system was blinking red. " In response to each attack, exhaustive probes were launched to determine whose incompetence allowed the disaster to happen.
NEWS
By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Climate change has a communication problem, according to Maris St. Cyr, a representative of the Maryland League of Conservation Voters. "We need to make [climate change] a personal issue. That is when people react; when it is personal. " St. Cyr was one of more than two dozen public officials and environmental advocates at a roundtable on climate change led by U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin on Friday at the Maryland Science Center . The group discussed how to reframe environmental issues in a way that, they hoped, would appeal to conservatives and galvanize the public to action.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Government officials involved in the multistate Chesapeake Bay cleanup pledged Monday to broaden and accelerate the long-running effort, including a vow to address the impacts of climate change on the ailing estuary. Governors of Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Delaware signed a new bay restoration agreement in Annapolis, which for the first time formally encompasses "upstream" states with smaller slices of the 64,000-square-mile watershed, including New York and West Virginia.
NEWS
By Ned Tillman | June 12, 2014
Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy earlier this month announced plans to lower the carbon emissions from our antiquated coal-fired power plants 30 percent by 2030. Much of the justification for this has been focused on the need to slow down global warming, sea level rise and other threats of climate change. But there are many other benefits to Marylanders from reducing our dependence on coal-fired power plants that we need to fully understand so that we can enthusiastically support these new measures and speed up their adoption.
NEWS
August 10, 2011
In response to Dana Knighten's recent commentary ("Cool solution for a warming planet," Aug. 9), I would revise and expand on her observation on global warming. "Climate change is nonpartisan, nondenominational, non-nationalistic... " - and non-sense.   Dave Reich, Perry Hall
NEWS
By Wes Moore | June 10, 2014
While describing the potentially devastating effects of climate change during a recent segment of "The Colbert Report," host Stephen Colbert warned that if climate change continues unabated, much of the planet will turn into an uninhabitable wasteland, just like — wait for it — Baltimore. With abandoned row homes featured in the inset, the serious implication of Mr. Colbert's jest was clear: Baltimore, the epitome of urban decay, is unlivable and unsalvageable. While the segment failed to make me laugh, it did make me think.
NEWS
June 8, 2014
Republicans, trying to deflect their own lack of leadership in anything but hatred for President Barack Obama, often accuse him of not leading, particularly in the realm of international affairs where Republicans seem only to count actions as leadership when they involve firing a gun or a missile. However, the facts put the lie to this Republican assertion. Flying in the face of intense pressure to ignore the disastrous effects of climate change on our health, our homes, and even our lives and those of our children and grandchildren, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced a much-needed plan to start reducing climate change by cutting carbon emissions for existing power plants.
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