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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Teachers in Maryland are about to get new help and encouragement to talk about the touchy topic of global warming in their classrooms. The National Science Foundation announced Wednesday that it is awarding $5.8 million for improving climate-change education in Maryland and Delaware through a partnership including universities and school systems from both states. The two-state initiative is one of six such education projects the foundation is funding across the country and in the nation's Pacific island territories.
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Tim Wheeler | October 8, 2014
An overwhelming majority of Marylanders are worried about pollution in the Chesapeake Bay, a new poll finds, and most are concerned enough about the bay's slumping crabs to back a moratorium on crabbing. The survey by Goucher College found 84 percent of those contacted last week said they were very or somewhat concerned about bay pollution. Just 14 percent said it worried them little or not at all. The 708 Marylanders interviewed by telephone were only a little more upbeat about the overall health of the state's environment - 62 percent rated it fair to poor, while 36 percent consider it good to excellent.
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NEWS
December 16, 2011
The climate-transformed planet of 2100 offers, as Mike Tidwell states, little reason for optimism ("The hottest issue," Dec. 15). Further gloom is warranted by the fact that a plurality of Americans have been egregiously misled by the industry-fueled message of triumphant consumerism and climate-change denial prevalent in our media. In the fantasy land inhabited by conservative denialists, the notion of climate change as a liberal conspiracy to enact a one-world government (forced re-education camps for SUV owners!
NEWS
By Charles Cadwell and Mark Goldberg | October 6, 2014
Climate change has been in the news a lot lately. The United Nations held a Climate Change Summit, which was attended by more than 100 heads of state. Hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets of New York for a "People's Climate March," the biggest such event ever. But there was a third very important climate-related development that received much less attention than it warranted: President Barack Obama issued a new executive order that may prove to be a turning point for efforts to advance climate preparedness around the world and for U.S. foreign aid planning.
NEWS
December 4, 2009
T he pace at which the world's glaciers are melting can't hold a candle to the rate at which public acceptance of climate change is losing ground. Two years ago, about 7 out of 10 Americans linked greenhouse gases to global warming, but today it's closer to a 50-50 split. There are any number of reasons for this, ranging from the "inconvenience" of climate change policy during an economic recession to the growing partisan divide over the science of it. The fact that Republicans willingly nominated a presidential candidate in 2008 whose position on climate change and the need to reduce carbon emissions was not much different from his Democratic opponent's seems largely forgotten today.
NEWS
By Faye Fiore and Richard Simon and Faye Fiore and Richard Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 22, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The doors swung open and he made his entrance as cameras clicked. The man who was called a wooden politician, was denied the presidency and was derided as "Ozone Man" was coming home to the Capitol. But this time they called him a movie star and likened him to a prophet. Al Gore left Washington seven years ago after the disputed 2000 election. He returned yesterday as the subject of an Academy Award-winning film, a nominee for the Nobel Peace Prize, a 58-year-old who can share a stage with Leonardo DiCaprio and manage to be the center of attention.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | June 24, 2009
Warning that the water is rising in the Chesapeake Bay, scientists and activists urged Tuesday that Congress act to reduce climate-warming pollution that threatens to flood bayfront communities and worsen the fish-suffocating "dead zones" that plague North America's largest estuary. With a House vote possible Friday on a bill that would seek to curtail greenhouse gas emissions nationwide, two natural resources subcommittees held a field hearing Tuesday at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater to learn more about what global warming might mean for coastal regions like the Chesapeake.
NEWS
June 25, 2013
The fight against climate change must be local, global and immediate. The clear and increasingly imminent threat should be of concern to everyone on the planet but especially to those who live near oceans and bays due to their vulnerability to rising water levels ("Climate change warnings," June 12). In spite of overwhelming scientific evidence, there are still politicians who, for reasons of ideology and special interests, deny the facts and science. House Speaker John Boehner, for example, dismisses the looming danger as "absolutely crazy.
NEWS
February 11, 2013
Kudos to Mike Tidwell for his clear commentary explaining why we need a revenue-neutral carbon tax to reduce emissions and slow climate change ("Forecast calls for pain," Feb. 6). I'm convinced, but how are the American people going to convince Congress to pass such a tax? Readers should go to Washington, D.C. on Feb. 17 for a noon rally and march assembling on the mall near the Washington Monument. The goal of the march is to let President Barack Obama know we have his back on his plans to impose more EPA regulations, to deny permission to build the Keystone XL pipeline, and whatever other environmental orders he chooses to issue with his executive authority.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
The Sun's recent reader poll ("What Maryland thinks," July 10) shows that a majority of those responding to this "not scientific" survey doubt that man made climate changes contributed to recent weather extremes. As one who holds an advanced degree in science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, I disagree. If you had polled only accredited scientists, I wager about 99 percent would have stated that global warming, in fact, has contributed to recent weather events. In the scientific community, this has become the accepted and undisputed position for years and is a position adopted by the National Academy of Sciences.
NEWS
September 26, 2014
More than 300,000 people marched this past weekend to demand action on climate change, and Maryland was well-represented ( "Marylanders join climate march in N.Y.C.," Sept. 22). It was not your typical rally. I marched alongside grandparents who wore their knee braces in hopes of making it the full distance. I marched alongside high-school students who were making a documentary of the movement that would define their livelihood. I marched alongside people of all ages, colors, backgrounds and experiences.
NEWS
By Donald Boesch and Edward Maibach | September 25, 2014
George Mason University research, released jointly with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, shows that roughly three quarters of Marylanders understand that climate change is a threat to our health, homes, businesses and natural resources, and more than half of them support state initiatives to address the problem. Now, with elections less than two months away, it's time to ensure we continue to move forward. Maryland is highly vulnerable, with more than 3,000 miles of coastline.
NEWS
September 24, 2014
What good news! The morning after more than 400,000 activists turned out to protest climate change, major philanthropies pledged to divest from fossil fuel ("Philanthropies, including Rockefellers, and investors pledge $50 billion fossil fuel divestment," Sept. 22), demonstrating how the tables are turning in this false controversy over the environment vs. the economy and jobs. The Rockefeller Fund and many others have recognized there is no question that the economy will fail miserably if we permit climate change to continue unabated.
NEWS
September 24, 2014
As one of the hundreds of thousands who participated in the People's Climate March in New York City on Sunday, I am outraged that The Sun buried its coverage of this event on Page 6, beneath a blurry photo of participants ("Worldwide marches call for climate effort," Sept. 22). It began by stating that "thousands of people" participated and did not cite the lowest estimate of the actual turnout, 310,000, until the ninth paragraph, the same paragraph in which it also mentioned that U.N. Secretary Ban Ki Moon, former Vice President Al Gore and actor Leonardo DiCaprio participated.
NEWS
September 24, 2014
Baltimore is happily celebrating our Birds, who last week clinched their first American League division title in 17 years. The O's certainly earned cheers for the joy they've brought us all season. But other kinds of birds are in trouble. A report earlier this month indicated that almost half of North America's bird species risk extinction before the end of this century. Meanwhile, a National Audubon study of over 500 species found that most face major habitat loss as climate disturbances shrink and shift the places where they can live.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
More than 600 Marylanders marched with hundreds of thousands of others in New York City Sunday in support of stronger action to address climate change, according to organizers of the state effort. People boarded 13 chartered buses to join the   People's Climate March   from cities across Maryland, organizers said, including Baltimore, Annapolis, College Park, Greenbelt, Columbia, Frederick and Silver Spring. Seth Bush, coordinator of the Maryland contingent, called the level of support from the state "overwhelming.
NEWS
August 10, 2011
In response to Dana Knighten's recent commentary ("Cool solution for a warming planet," Aug. 9), I would revise and expand on her observation on global warming. "Climate change is nonpartisan, nondenominational, non-nationalistic... " - and non-sense.   Dave Reich, Perry Hall
NEWS
September 22, 2014
Monocles are off to the New Yorker for the best headline we've seen yet regarding climate change, this week's United Nations summit in New York and the large-scale demonstrations that have accompanied it: "Largest Climate-Change March in History Unlikely to Convince Idiots. " It's harsh but fair. For the record, man-made climate change is undeniable and serious. There is remarkably little division in the scientific community about that finding. That's not to suggest there doesn't continue to be legitimate debate on such specifics as the timetable for how quickly that change is taking place or the best approach to remediation.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
The Ecumenical Leaders Group represents seven denominations of Christian churches in Maryland. We are heartsick about the impact climate change is having on our neighbors close to home and around the world and mindful that the survival and flourishing of all peoples depend on our ability to move from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources ( "Too much carbon, too little time," Sept. 11). Heat-trapping pollution like carbon dioxide and methane, released into the air by humans at unprecedented levels in the last hundred years, has damaged our climate and made our oceans more acidic.
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