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NEWS
May 26, 2013
While reading the front page of The Sun the article on the loss of amphibians ("Alarming U.S. decline in environment's sentinels," May 23), I heard on the radio that Congress is trying to assure construction of the Alberta tar sands pipeline. About two weeks ago, scientists reported that the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere had reached 400 parts per million. There has been a chance that the percentage of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere could at least be stabilized, but with the construction of the pipeline this would no longer be possible.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 8, 2014
An overwhelming majority of Marylanders are worried about pollution in the Chesapeake Bay, a new poll finds, and most are concerned enough about the bay's slumping crabs to back a moratorium on crabbing. The survey by Goucher College found 84 percent of those contacted last week said they were very or somewhat concerned about bay pollution. Just 14 percent said it worried them little or not at all. The 708 Marylanders interviewed by telephone were only a little more upbeat about the overall health of the state's environment - 62 percent rated it fair to poor, while 36 percent consider it good to excellent.
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NEWS
June 25, 2013
The fight against climate change must be local, global and immediate. The clear and increasingly imminent threat should be of concern to everyone on the planet but especially to those who live near oceans and bays due to their vulnerability to rising water levels ("Climate change warnings," June 12). In spite of overwhelming scientific evidence, there are still politicians who, for reasons of ideology and special interests, deny the facts and science. House Speaker John Boehner, for example, dismisses the looming danger as "absolutely crazy.
NEWS
By Charles Cadwell and Mark Goldberg | October 6, 2014
Climate change has been in the news a lot lately. The United Nations held a Climate Change Summit, which was attended by more than 100 heads of state. Hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets of New York for a "People's Climate March," the biggest such event ever. But there was a third very important climate-related development that received much less attention than it warranted: President Barack Obama issued a new executive order that may prove to be a turning point for efforts to advance climate preparedness around the world and for U.S. foreign aid planning.
NEWS
December 7, 2013
I was pleased to see that the mayor's office is concerned about Baltimore's climate for investment and economic growth ( "City to study ways to improve Baltimore economic and business climate Dec. 3). I am certain the consultant will have suggestions that are worth $167,500. But I would like to suggest that the mayor meet first with Professor Stephen Walters, a talented economist at Loyola University and the John Hopkins University Institute for Applied Economics. Professor Walters has studied the Baltimore problem and has some excellent ideas.
NEWS
November 1, 2012
For almost 30 years now, Hieronimus & Co. in its various radio broadcasts, television, print, online, and other public forums has addressed the increasing weather extremes as a result of global warming. This discussion began in earnest in 1985 among scientists, and only now is it becoming self-evident with the October surprise of Hurricane Sandy, not to mention the severe droughts, floods, record temperatures worldwide, and other anomalous weather patterns and their deleterious impacts on animals, nature and humans.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2010
The Maryland Economic Development Association plans to examine the state's business climate at its annual conference next month. The topic is a long-debated one that was recently highlighted again when Maryland lost the competition to lure Northrop Grumman's headquarters to neighboring Virginia. The conference — titled Maryland's Competitiveness: Leading the Park or Following the Leader — is scheduled June 6 to 8 at the Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay in Cambridge.
NEWS
May 21, 2010
The National Academy of Science recently urged the federal government to take drastic action, such as a carbon tax or cap-and-trade legislation, to slow global warming. Such legislation is currently pending in the U.S. Senate. The Senate bill provides for significant investment in clean transportation and renewable energy, as well as establishes a climate trading system. So, why should we tackle this issue now? For starters, over 60 percent of all the carbon dioxide emitted by we humans has occurred since 1975.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
The streets around City Dock in Annapolis flooded again Friday, closing the Spa Creek Bridge connecting the Eastport neighborhood with downtown for several hours. It was yet another reminder to Lisa Craig that she's in a race against time to protect one of Maryland's oldest communities from the rising waters of the Chesapeake Bay. "We've probably doubled the number of nuisance flooding events in the past several years," said Craig, director of historic preservation for the city of Annapolis.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 28, 2012
Baltimore is about to adopt a "climate action plan" that among other things calls for increasing energy efficiency in city homes and buildings, developing more renewable energy, getting more people out of their cars and planting more trees. The plan, drawn up over the past 11 months, spells out a laundry list of measures aimed at reducing climate-warming emissions of carbon dioxide 15 percent by the end of the decade.  The plan is scheduled for a final hearing before adoption by the city Planning Commission on Thursday, Nov. 29 at 2:30 pm at the Office of Sustainability, 417 E. Fayette St., 8th floor.
NEWS
September 26, 2014
More than 300,000 people marched this past weekend to demand action on climate change, and Maryland was well-represented ( "Marylanders join climate march in N.Y.C.," Sept. 22). It was not your typical rally. I marched alongside grandparents who wore their knee braces in hopes of making it the full distance. I marched alongside high-school students who were making a documentary of the movement that would define their livelihood. I marched alongside people of all ages, colors, backgrounds and experiences.
NEWS
By Donald Boesch and Edward Maibach | September 25, 2014
George Mason University research, released jointly with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, shows that roughly three quarters of Marylanders understand that climate change is a threat to our health, homes, businesses and natural resources, and more than half of them support state initiatives to address the problem. Now, with elections less than two months away, it's time to ensure we continue to move forward. Maryland is highly vulnerable, with more than 3,000 miles of coastline.
NEWS
September 24, 2014
As one of the hundreds of thousands who participated in the People's Climate March in New York City on Sunday, I am outraged that The Sun buried its coverage of this event on Page 6, beneath a blurry photo of participants ("Worldwide marches call for climate effort," Sept. 22). It began by stating that "thousands of people" participated and did not cite the lowest estimate of the actual turnout, 310,000, until the ninth paragraph, the same paragraph in which it also mentioned that U.N. Secretary Ban Ki Moon, former Vice President Al Gore and actor Leonardo DiCaprio participated.
NEWS
September 24, 2014
Baltimore is happily celebrating our Birds, who last week clinched their first American League division title in 17 years. The O's certainly earned cheers for the joy they've brought us all season. But other kinds of birds are in trouble. A report earlier this month indicated that almost half of North America's bird species risk extinction before the end of this century. Meanwhile, a National Audubon study of over 500 species found that most face major habitat loss as climate disturbances shrink and shift the places where they can live.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
Monocles are off to the New Yorker for the best headline we've seen yet regarding climate change, this week's United Nations summit in New York and the large-scale demonstrations that have accompanied it: "Largest Climate-Change March in History Unlikely to Convince Idiots. " It's harsh but fair. For the record, man-made climate change is undeniable and serious. There is remarkably little division in the scientific community about that finding. That's not to suggest there doesn't continue to be legitimate debate on such specifics as the timetable for how quickly that change is taking place or the best approach to remediation.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
More than 600 Marylanders marched with hundreds of thousands of others in New York City Sunday in support of stronger action to address climate change, according to organizers of the state effort. People boarded 13 chartered buses to join the   People's Climate March   from cities across Maryland, organizers said, including Baltimore, Annapolis, College Park, Greenbelt, Columbia, Frederick and Silver Spring. Seth Bush, coordinator of the Maryland contingent, called the level of support from the state "overwhelming.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | January 16, 2009
Environmentalists, manufacturers and union leaders have hammered out their differences over state climate-change legislation, clearing the way for a compromise measure after two years of contentious debate, Maryland's top environmental official said yesterday. Environment Secretary Shari T. Wilson said representatives of industry, labor and environmental groups sent a letter to Gov. Martin O'Malley urging him to introduce the "delicate balance" to which they have agreed. It would commit the state to reducing climate-warming pollution 25 percent by 2020, but it would not require any reductions from the state's manufacturing plants unless mandated by the federal government or by some multistate action.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish | August 7, 2007
A resolution proposed by Mount Airy Mayor Frank Johnson to endorse a national climate-protection pledge died at a Town Council meeting last night. Council member John Woodhull made a motion to support Johnson's resolution, but it was not seconded by any of the three other council members present. As mayor, Johnson can introduce legislation and resolutions but does not vote. Sykesville is the only one of Carroll County's eight municipalities to endorse the U.S. Mayor's Climate Protection Agreement, which promotes energy conservation to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 15, 2014
Baltimore and Annapolis are likely to suffer serious coastal flooding again before this century is over, and people and property in Ocean City and on the lower Eastern Shore face even greater risks as climate change accelerates sea level rise along Maryland's extensive shoreline, warns a new report. Drawing on new government data and projections, Climate Centra l, a nonprofit research and information group, calculates that 41,000 homes with 55,000 residents in the state are in danger under mid-range sea-level rise projections if storm-driven flooding surges five feet above the high tide line - which it did in the Baltimore area and elsewhere during Tropical Storm Isabel in 2003.
NEWS
September 11, 2014
If increasingly extreme weather events around the world weren't alarming enough, the latest monitoring by the World Meteorological Organization shows last year was the worst ever for rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Their report released Tuesday demonstrates why efforts to curb climate change deserve to be a top priority for U.S. foreign policy. The WMO tracks not just the greenhouse gases emitted by power plants, motor vehicles, factories and other major contributors but what the net effect is on the atmosphere since a certain amount of carbon dioxide is naturally absorbed by plants and oceans.
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