Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCliffhanger
IN THE NEWS

Cliffhanger

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 17, 1996
There is no happily ever after on "Homicide: Life on the Street," so don't come looking for any happy endings in tonight's cliffhanger season finale, titled "Work Related."Last week, Meldrick Lewis (Clark Johnson) was married in the Rose Room of the Belvedere Hotel with everybody merrily dancing the night away to a band straight out of "Twin Peaks." This week, Lewis admits to Kellerman (Reed Diamond) that he has yet to consummate his marriage and, in fact, his new wife, Barbara, has left him.'til death do you what?
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | August 27, 2012
Lost City Diner, whose lavish pop decor was inspired by high-adventure cliffhangers like the ones with Buck Rogers, was last seen ... hanging off a cliff. The fountain shop materialized out of nowhere in August 2011 only to close, suddenly, in February of this year. At the time, owner Joy Martin promised that Lost City Diner would return. Martin said she was closing Lost City Diner for some kitchen renovations. • Inside the Lost City Diner [Pictures] It looks it will be. Two new signs have popped up in the restaurant's Charles Street windows -- "Lost City Diner, Fall 2012.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Harry Wessel and Harry Wessel,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 1, 1998
"The Hundred Days," by Patrick O'Brian. Norton. 288 pages. $24. Just the arrival of "The Hundred Days," the 19th book in the Aubrey-Maturin series, is unadulterated joy for fans of Patrick O'Brian. It's been nearly two years since O'Brian's last entry, "The Yellow Admiral," and the octagenarian's loyal readers feared the series might be at its end.It's not. In fact, a 20th book is promised for the long-running, high-brow buddy adventure that follows sea captain Jack Aubrey and naval surgeon/spy Stephen Maturin during the Napoleonic Wars of the early 19th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2012
Lost City Diner materialized in Charles North last August. Now, the fountain shop and late-night stop is shutting down. Don't worry, though, its owner, Joy Martin, says, it's only for an intermission. Martin, who also own the Club Charles, gave no firm date for the re-opening of Lost City Diner .  In an emailed message said she's "just closing to do some renovations to the kitchen and try to get my sign up. "    When Lost City Diner opened suddenly last summer, it seemed to be the final chapter a long-running serial that played out for years on the corner of Charles and Lanvale, a half block up from the Club Charles Lost City Diner, when it revealed itself, was beautiful, with antique fixtures and fanciful retro-industrial elements gorgeously evoking the giddy atmosphere of a Buck Rogers serial from the 1930s.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | May 14, 1994
"MacGyver" returns in a made-for-TV form, "Saturday Nigh Live" attempts to finish the season in fine form, and "Red Shoe Diaries" presents the fine form of Audie England.* "Bob Hope's Birthday Memories." (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- No sense waiting until the last minute -- or in 15 days, when Hope truly turns 91. As is the case with most recent Hope specials, there's a lot of reliance upon clips from previous years to help fill the hours. Guests this time, live and in blast-from-the-past footage, are scheduled to include Angie Dickinson, Phyllis Diller and Betty White.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | July 22, 1993
DEAR Mr. Valenti:I know that you have spent most of your professional life protecting children from sex and violence in the movies. You have accomplished this by designating ratings from G to PG to R to X.While your concern has been for young people, it seems that you have no ratings to protect adults from the motion pictures being shown today.I realized this when I decided to go to see a film last night. Much to my horror everything playing was for children. Not one movie was aimed at the adult mind.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 14, 2007
Believers beat skeptics dead-cold when it comes to affecting the reception of a big-budget movie. Catholic groups that protested the release of that free-thinking spectacle The Golden Compass congratulated themselves on its disappointing returns at the box office this week. But you haven't heard a peep from any atheist groups who might protest I Am Legend for implying that God is responsible for saving a remnant of mankind from a virus that turns most people into zombielike vampires. Midway through, the last thing the military-scientist hero, played by Will Smith, sees before he thinks he'll succumb to a swarm of "Dark Seekers" is a glittering cross.
NEWS
November 2, 2002
WITH ELECTION 2002 at hand, civics teachers in Maryland hail the democratic rite of free elections. Then, on Tuesday, their students will learn a real life lesson: More than half the eligible voters in their state, including many of their parents, won't bother to meet their civic responsibilities. Even a cliffhanger election seems unlikely to alter that prospect. Many excuses are offered -- none of them washes. Polling done during the Florida recount after Election 2000 showed appreciable numbers of newly committed U.S. voters.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 5, 1993
The world's slowest love affair is picking up steam.The seventh in a series of Taster's Choice coffee commercials aired on CBS' "Northern Exposure" Monday night. And it concludes with a kiss. So what, you say?So this kiss has been a long time coming.This particular ad campaign, created by McCann-Erickson for Nestle Co., which makes Taster's Choice, features a romance between two sophisticated singles. It first began percolating after she knocked on his door and asked to borrow some coffee.
NEWS
By ABIGAIL TUCKER AND DAVID ZURAWIK and ABIGAIL TUCKER AND DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN REPORTERS | May 25, 2006
As the victorious Taylor Hicks warbled his new single on the American Idol finale last night, Fells Point resident Jamie Sienko and her girlfriends were watching in style. The 27-year- old teacher had persuaded her boyfriend to let them use his home movie theater with the stadium-style seats; they had an enviable view of the surprise Prince appearance, Kellie Pickler eating escargot in an ill-advised comedy bit and runner-up Katharine McPhee bravely smiling. But two lucky invitees to the party sent their regrets, and not because they were too busy for television.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2011
"I Used to Be Darker" is meant to jump from the blocks at full speed: A 19-year-old discovers that she's pregnant, grabs a knife and exacts devastating revenge on the cad who knocked her up. After she loses her job overseeing bumper cars at an Ocean City arcade, she high-tails it to Baltimore. The film's writer-director, Matt Porterfield, and his co-writer (and partner), Amy Belk, pack a midsummer day's nightmare into a vivid streak of incidents. It could be the perfect lift-off for the rest of the story – and no one doubts Porterfield's ability to pull the sequence off. "Hamilton" and "Putty Hill," his first two features, demonstrated his skill at delivering keen emotion on the run. But Porterfield, who is shooting the rest of the script in Baltimore, has bet the completion of "I Used to Be Darker" on his ability to raise $40,000 by Aug. 13 through Kickstarter, the website for creative entrepreneurs.
NEWS
By Bill Dwyre, Tribune newspapers | June 19, 2010
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. — They call the stretch of holes from Nos. 8 through 10 at Pebble Beach the Cliffs of Doom. Golfers call it names not nearly that nice. Take Dr. Gil Morgan. He led the 1992 U.S. Open at Pebble by seven shots on Saturday and had reached an Open-record 12 under par through seven holes. He was hitting everything perfectly. Life was good. The Cliffs beckoned, and Morgan smiled. Then he went double bogey, bogey, double bogey, disintegrated to 4 under by the end of his round and shot 81 on Sunday.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 14, 2007
Believers beat skeptics dead-cold when it comes to affecting the reception of a big-budget movie. Catholic groups that protested the release of that free-thinking spectacle The Golden Compass congratulated themselves on its disappointing returns at the box office this week. But you haven't heard a peep from any atheist groups who might protest I Am Legend for implying that God is responsible for saving a remnant of mankind from a virus that turns most people into zombielike vampires. Midway through, the last thing the military-scientist hero, played by Will Smith, sees before he thinks he'll succumb to a swarm of "Dark Seekers" is a glittering cross.
NEWS
By ABIGAIL TUCKER AND DAVID ZURAWIK and ABIGAIL TUCKER AND DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN REPORTERS | May 25, 2006
As the victorious Taylor Hicks warbled his new single on the American Idol finale last night, Fells Point resident Jamie Sienko and her girlfriends were watching in style. The 27-year- old teacher had persuaded her boyfriend to let them use his home movie theater with the stadium-style seats; they had an enviable view of the surprise Prince appearance, Kellie Pickler eating escargot in an ill-advised comedy bit and runner-up Katharine McPhee bravely smiling. But two lucky invitees to the party sent their regrets, and not because they were too busy for television.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | November 24, 2005
The days get colder and shorter and many of us move inside to do the bunker hunker until spring. Put that time to good use by reading Reaching the Summit (DK Publishing, 232 pages, $30), a biography of Sir Edmund Hillary, who with Tenzing Norgay were the first men to reach the summit of Mount Everest. Now 86, Sir Edmund's life has been more than just conquering the world's highest mountain. He has explored remote corners of the globe and returned to the Himalayas to help the Sherpa people.
NEWS
November 2, 2002
WITH ELECTION 2002 at hand, civics teachers in Maryland hail the democratic rite of free elections. Then, on Tuesday, their students will learn a real life lesson: More than half the eligible voters in their state, including many of their parents, won't bother to meet their civic responsibilities. Even a cliffhanger election seems unlikely to alter that prospect. Many excuses are offered -- none of them washes. Polling done during the Florida recount after Election 2000 showed appreciable numbers of newly committed U.S. voters.
NEWS
November 10, 1994
One million, three hundred thousand votes later, we still don't know who's the next governor of Maryland. Not until ballots, cast in absentia, are counted today will the suspense end for candidates Parris N. Glendening and Ellen R. Sauerbrey.In yesterday's Howard County and Final (single-sales) editions, an editing error led to publication of an editorial that incorrectly indicated a narrow Glendening victory. The editorial that was scheduled to run, entitled "Too Close to Call," more accurately reflected the uncertain situation then -- and now. While Democrat Glendening clings to a 6,100-vote lead, absentee votes (50,000 ballots were requested)
NEWS
September 11, 1995
Does every vote count?Ask Rep. Kweisi Mfume, who launched his political career bwinning a primary election to the Baltimore City Council by three votes.Or ask Parris N. Glendening and Ellen Sauerbrey. Both sat inerve-wracking suspense for weeks before he was declared the victor in Maryland's gubernatorial election last year.By all accounts, Baltimore's municipal primary tomorrow will be cliffhanger. Indeed, the primary is unusual in that two of the top three citywide incumbents are not running for reelection and all three offices are being ferociously contested.
BUSINESS
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 2001
In 1921, when the West Baltimore community of Ten Hills was being established, a newspaper advertisement listed the "10 reasons why" people should move to the neighborhood. Among the benefits, the ad said, were "an unmistakable air of refinement," 100-by-200-foot lots that can accommodate a "spacious bungalow or cottage" with surrounding lawn; "ultra-modern conveniences," such as gas and sewer lines, 50-foot-wide paved streets and phone service. The ad also noted the nearness of schools, churches and shopping, and a trolley that took you downtown in just 25 minutes.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 1, 2001
The one sure thing that can be said as the contract between the Writers Guild of America and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers nears its midnight expiration tonight is that almost no one seems to want a strike. That does not mean there won't ultimately be one, but both sides seemed determined over the weekend and yesterday to at least try to keep the talks going past tonight's deadline if progress is being made. What's at stake for the players in Hollywood are billions of dollars in future revenue and residuals primarily connected to the future sale of U.S. television series and future films abroad.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.