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NEWS
By Raymond L. Sanchez and Raymond L. Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | May 17, 1991
On many Sunday afternoons, Elizabeth L. Julian visits what she calls the "house of sadness" -- City Jail.The folders she carries are filled with notes chronicling death, drugs and lives gone mad.On this day, Julian passes a long line of women visitors, some with packages of cigarettes and toiletries, others carrying infants.The women stare at her, wondering why she doesn't have to wait in line.Julian, 37, is an assistant public defender in the office's felony trial section, where lawyers say the workload is so heavy that effective representation of clients is virtually impossible.
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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | August 2, 1998
They met by the side of the road, the victim and the felon. The felon brought groceries. Chicken thighs, ground beef, Little Debbies, soda on sale. More than five years after he stole hundreds of thousands of dollars from her, the felon gave these things to the victim, along with a roll of cash amounting, by her count, to $28. He asked her to call him in two weeks if she needed more. Then he left.They met on Falls Road, at an animal hospital, because Raymond A. Tubman, a disbarred lawyer who stole his clients' money, could not locate the little apartment where his victim lives.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | March 7, 1993
New York -- With three lean years behind them, advertising executives should be preparing for good times as the economy rebounds and companies roll out new marketing campaigns.Some promising signs have appeared already. Billings for the $140 billion industry are expected to rise 6 percent this year. Television spectacles such as the Super Bowl and the mini-series "Queen" have sold out -- the first time in recent years that companies have been strong enough to compete for spots on prestige programs.
BUSINESS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Evening Sun Staff | November 5, 1991
A former Towson investment counselor, who stole $843,000 from nine clients, has pleaded guilty in Baltimore County Circuit Court to one count each of theft, failure to file a tax return and securities fraud.Michael E. Hart, 34, who many of his former mostly retired clients said they thought of as a son, entered the guilty plea in exchange for the state dropping other charges against him.Judge J. Norris Byrnes immediately revoked Hart's $500,000 bail -- a bail he was never able to post -- and ordered a presentence report.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2000
Digex Inc. yesterday reported a surge in revenue even as losses widened for the third quarter that ended Sept. 30. A leading provider of Web hosting and application services for companies engaged in e-business, the Beltsville company posted revenue of $46.5 million compared with $20.8 million for the comparable quarter last year. Net losses for the company increased to $41.2 million, or 61 cents per share, compared with last year's third quarter losses of $20.7 million. Some analysts applauded Digex for what they termed a solid quarter as it attracted bigger clients, drew greater revenue from existing clients, and registered a near tripling of revenue growth in the year-to-date category.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 30, 1997
George M. Andrews Sr., director of vocational services at TARGET Inc., has a very simple philosophy."I'll do anything to meet someone's needs at their level," he says. "I believe it's the person's responsibility to work if they're at all able, and we do whatever is necessary to help the person get and keep a job."That philosophy may have something to do with TARGET's success. The rehabilitation program, which provides services to the developmentally disabled, recently earned an Organization of the Year award from the Maryland Rehabilitation Association for its vocational program.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2000
Warschawski Public Relations, a Baltimore-based agency whose clients include adidas-Salomon AG, is to announce today the formation of a division to handle high-technology clients, with four companies already under its wing. The new division will offer global branding, media relations, strategic counsel, market research and event coordination to technology companies, said founder and President David Warschawski. "We're not interested in being pigeonholed into working with one kind of tech company," Warschawski said.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2010
A Maryland Department of Human Resources employee was placed on administrative leave after posting the Social Security numbers and other personal information of nearly 3,000 clients of a state agency on a third-party website, a spokeswoman for the agency said. There's no evidence that the information was used for identity theft, said DHR spokeswoman Nancy Lineman, but DHR, which provides benefits such as food stamps and other aid, will offer affected clients a year of credit monitoring.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2003
Some of Maryland lobbyist Bruce C. Bereano's clients voiced concern yesterday about this week's ruling that he violated state ethics law, but promised to stand with him -- at least for now. "We stick by Bruce," said Greg TenEyck, a spokesman for Safeway Inc.'s eastern division. "We've worked with Bruce for a number of years. I trust him. I believe he is innocent of his charges." Robin Tomechko, chairwoman of the Maryland State Association of Big Brothers/Big Sisters, which includes seven chapters across the state, said her organization plans to discuss the matter at a forthcoming meeting.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2002
Dakota Imaging Inc. has made its business in creating custom multimillion-dollar data processing systems for large companies and agencies for which paper processing is crucial. But the 13-year-old Columbia-based company has created technology to expand its business by offering many of those services to small companies over the Internet. Business Process Outsourcing - the company's newest service - gives small firms and agencies that process claims, applications and other paper forms access to technology to read documents quickly, process them, and store the data.
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