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By EILEEN AMBROSE | December 28, 2008
If your mailbox is filling up faster than usual, thank your financial planner. Ever since the failure of Lehman Brothers Holdings in September that set off a panic, planners have been sending three to five times the usual number of newsletters and e-mail blasts to clients. "We have been sending out a lot of articles trying to reassure people that they need to hang in there as long as they can," says Annette Simon, a Bethesda financial planner. "The instinct for a lot of people ... was to get out and maybe stop contributing to their 401(k)
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NEWS
By Greg Garland and Thomas W. Waldron and Greg Garland and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2000
A Prince George's County senator disputed yesterday lobbyist Gerard E. Evans' assertions to clients that the legislator planned to introduce a bill the companies were paying Evans to fight. Sen. Paul G. Pinsky testified in U.S. District Court in Baltimore that letters Evans wrote to his clients in 1997 and 1998 warning them of Pinsky's plans to introduce lead paint legislation were not true. "I guess I make for a good straw man to create a case of fraud," said Pinsky, a Democrat. The prosecutor in the federal mail-fraud trial of Evans and Del. Tony E. Fulton used Pinsky's testimony to try to show that the lobbyist misled his clients in order to generate lobbying fees.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1999
Lobbyist Bruce C. Bereano ended his five-month stint in a federal halfway house in East Baltimore yesterday, upbeat about his personal growth during confinement and looking forward to a full return from his legal purgatory.Standing in the parking lot of the Volunteers of America halfway house -- a former low-rate motel on East Monument Street -- Bereano waved goodbye to a half-dozen detainees who were watching him load his champagne-colored Mercedes-Benz with clothes, lamps and a television.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1999
Even before the 1999 General Assembly begins Wednesday, Bruce C. Bereano can claim victory in one of the toughest lobbying cases of his colorful career: persuading 30 or so clients to stick with him while he serves a 10-month court sentence for mail fraud.The first Maryland lobbyist to earn more than $1 million in a legislative session, Bereano will apparently become the first in Maryland to represent major corporate clients while in a work-release program for convicted criminals."Several of them said they want me or nobody," Bereano said.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1999
A new report by advocates for welfare recipients says city social workers have fallen down on the job of helping many of their clients get ready for the work force -- at a time when state officials are considering reducing the number of Baltimore caseworkers nearly 25 percent.The report, by the Family Investment Program Legal Clinic, which provides free legal help to thousands of welfare recipients, urges legislators to lift the limit of five years' cash assistance for welfare clients who might not have gotten the help they need in Baltimore since welfare reform began four years ago.The report says some Baltimore workers, who handle an average 175 files each at any one time, don't know how to help recipients with criminal records get charges expunged so they'll be more employable.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Andrew Green and Lane Harvey Brown and Andrew Green,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2002
Friends of Harford County lawyer Thomas J. McLaughlin describe him as a community activist who shares his time and expertise freely with those in need. But court records portray a man who mishandled thousands of dollars from his clients -- and his own mother. The incongruous portrait of the Aberdeen attorney, who faces disbarment over complaints that he collected more than $200,000 in fees for work never performed, emerged yesterday as friends spoke of his unselfish community work and court files revealed bankruptcy and other legal problems.
NEWS
By Holly Selby | May 12, 1996
Ever notice that the people who seem the most highly motivated personally and professionally often are the ones who also have enough energy left over after a long day at the office to work out regularly? We did. And we wondered what gave them that extra boost.Turns out, it's not what, but who.You've got it. In offices, home gyms and fitness centers, many of Baltimore's movers and shakers are paying for an infusion of enthusiasm: They are hiring personal fitness trainers.A fitness trainer's primary function is, of course, to develop a safe, effective workout for his client.
FEATURES
By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 3, 2002
LOS ANGELES - With a shaved pate, trim build and clear blue eyes, John Biroc has a mien that is both cerebral and serene, like a mathematician moonlighting as a yoga instructor. But the 63-year-old therapist's actual job is quirkier. Biroc is a motivational coach for the mosh pit scene and a hand-holder for rap rockers. Biroc's client niche is a loud and unusual one: He works only with young rock musicians, most often tattooed, pierced and angst-ridden modern rock bands but with an occasional mellow songwriter tossed in. On a busy day, that makes his office in Los Angeles' neighborhood of Encino resemble the backstage scene at the Roxy.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | August 21, 1992
Everyone seemed to love the Human Development Institute: Its students, primarily women trying to move from the welfare rolls to full-time jobs. The Baltimore City office that oversaw its contract. Social workers, whose clients blossomed there. Employers, who grew to depend on the private business for motivated, eager workers.But HDI is no longer in the business of putting city welfare clients to work under the state's workfare program, Project Independence.While HDI placed 75 percent of its 1,500 clients in jobs, it fell victim to rigid federal regulations that made it virtually impossible for the small business to turn a profit.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1995
Local attorney Burton M. Greenstein has been disbarred by Maryland's Court of Appeals after he became entangled in the affairs of the late Fred Kolodner, an old friend who was disbarred in 1991 for misusing client funds.Mr. Greenstein agreed to the court's Dec. 15 order barring him from practicing law in Maryland, officials of the state Attorney Grievance Commission said yesterday. But even as Mr. Greenstein, who is recuperating from heart bypass surgery, watches his legal career fade to black, the details of what he allegedly did remain unclear.
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