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By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | June 29, 1993
Mark Orrell winces when he sees people who keep coming to the fitness center, don't slack off, put heart into their workouts, but are doing the wrong exercises.The 34-year-old exercise physiologist and personal trainer said he would like to help, but it wouldn't be fair to the client paying him if he took off to work with someone else. And his usual workday at Marriott Corp.'s corporate fitness center in Bethesda is one client after another, all day on his feet, grab a sandwich standing up.Mr.
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NEWS
By CHUCK PHILIPS and CHUCK PHILIPS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 11, 2006
In his first interview in three years, jailed private eye Anthony Pellicano accused federal authorities of exaggerating the strength of their case against him, which he predicted would soon fizzle out like a box-office flop. Speaking by telephone from the federal Metropolitan Detention Center in Los Angeles last week, Pellicano insisted that he would never cooperate with authorities or testify against a bevy of A-list lawyers, Hollywood executives, business moguls and celebrities who have hired him over the years to dig up dirt on their adversaries.
BUSINESS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | March 12, 1993
Federal prosecutors charged two former brokers yesterday with defrauding investors of more than $1.2 million.Michael Beck, 33, of Washington, and George Tully, 43, of Great Falls, Va., were charged with wire fraud in separate criminal information filings. The filing of a criminal information usually means a person has agreed to waive indictment and plead guilty to charges.The charges resulted from a probe by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Washington office of the National Association of Securities Dealers, where the men were registered as brokers.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 7, 2001
A 53-year-old woman was ordered yesterday to serve nine months in prison and repay money stolen from eight elderly clients served by Associated Catholic Charities. Wanda Wilson was sentenced in Baltimore Circuit Court on her felony theft conviction. She had previously pleaded guilty to stealing $14,400 from eight clients between 1997 and 1999, the Maryland attorney general's office said. Wilson was an administrator for a Catholic Charities program that assists senior citizens in managing their affairs, including their finances.
NEWS
By Bonita Formwalt and Bonita Formwalt,Contributing writer | February 12, 1992
After 18 months of furious activity, the sounds of construction havebegun to lessen at Providence Activity Center North. And now the clients are back.The activity center, under the umbrella of the Providence Center, has undergone a $600,000 renovation.Fifty-six mentally and physically disabled adults have returned to their workshop from Our Shepherd Lutheran Church in Severna Park, where they had a temporary facility.Michelle Zinck, program administrator, is very pleased to be back."We're now able to offer so much more.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | August 25, 1993
More than 400 people showed up yesterday for the state's second public hearing on welfare reform, where they complained once again about inadequate cash assistance, overwhelming paperwork and the bad manners of the people they deal with every day.But unlike the Aug. 4 hearing on Maryland's proposed overhaul of public assistance, these were workers, not clients, testifying before the Governor's Commission on Welfare Reform. Their complaints were remarkably similar to those heard earlier, although they came from the other side of the desk.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Putting into jeopardy a program that has raised millions of dollars for legal aid to the poor, a deeply divided Supreme Court ruled yesterday that clients are entitled to any interest earned on money left in their lawyers' hands.If lawyers pool their clients' money and then invest it to earn interest, as lawyers in every state but Indiana now do, the resulting income belongs to the client, the court declared by a 5-4 vote.The ruling came in a test case from Texas. But its potential effect is likely to reach state-run programs across the nation that have raised more than $100 million a year to cover legal services for the poor.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2002
The state's highest court released an opinion yesterday that explained in detail why it quickly disbarred a Harford County attorney after hearing allegations that he essentially bilked clients of tens of thousands of dollars. The Court of Appeals also rejected Timothy J. McLaughlin's request for further judicial proceedings, saying he had had plenty of opportunities to defend himself against the allegation that he took more than $70,000 from primarily elderly clients for work that he never performed.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 22, 1996
HESTER Richardson of Linthicum and Pauline Bottiger of Ferndale, volunteers for Meals on Wheels and route chairwomen, have had to cope with budget and blizzard troubles recently.Some clients who receive two meals a day Monday through Friday were concerned about the effect on Meals on Wheels of the government shutdown."To alleviate their concerns, letters were sent to each client to tell them that there was food," Mrs. Bottiger said. "Every client had their meals delivered."The blizzard was another story.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Staff Writer | October 13, 1993
The Howard County Department of Social Services plans to move its 120-worker offices from Ellicott City to Columbia, perhaps as early as the beginning of the year.The department is looking for new offices that would bring workers closer to the majority of the department's clients, half of whom live in Columbia, said Samuel Marshall, social services director.The move also will give the growing department badly needed space for its workers and clients, Mr. Marshall said.Officials have talked for years about needing more space, said Alex Tickner, assistant director for administration and finance.
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