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By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
Police investigating whether Harford County payroll company AccuPay stole years of tax payments rather than sending them to tax collectors on behalf of clients warned Monday that potential victims might number in the hundreds. An investigation by the Bel Air Police Department is in the early stages and likely will involve multiple agencies, a spokesman said. Potential victims could include any business that hired AccuPay to handle its payroll and remit its state and federal taxes, the spokesman said.
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BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 21, 1993
A good stockbroker is worth keeping. So imagine being separated from your favorite by a court order. It actually happened, says Mutual Fund Market News, a Boston newsletter.When a California broker left Merrill Lynch to join another firm, some of his top clients -- many of them friends and relatives -- decided to take their business with him.Not so fast, said Merrill Lynch.When Merrill hired the broker, he signed an agreement stating that, should he switch firms, he would not contact his Merrill Lynch clients for at least a year after his departure.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2004
Federal authorities arrested an Annapolis accountant yesterday on charges that he stole money from clients and defrauded the Internal Revenue Service on his own tax returns, collecting more than $130,000 in refunds that he was not owed. Charles G. Fagan, 61, was released after an initial appearance yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, where Magistrate Judge James K. Bredar ordered Fagan not to perform any accounting-related work while awaiting trial. Bredar told Fagan he could contact current clients, however, to advise them that they may need to request an extension for filing income tax forms.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | February 3, 1994
Dawn Hyde has made a second career out of helping companies with federal contracts and those that are federally insured meet affirmative-action hiring rules.A former personnel officer at Mercantile Safe Deposit and Trust Co., she quit 10 years ago to launch Columbia-based Berkshire Associates Inc., an affirmative-action consulting firm.A decade later, the company boasts about 60 clients looking for advice on meeting federal regulations on the hiring and promotion of women, minorities and the disabled.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | March 12, 2000
A FINANCIAL planner once said that the best client would be Rip Van Winkle, someone who slept for 20 years and let the planner build the portfolio. A comatose client isn't everyone's ideal, however. Some financial advisers say their favorite clients are knowledgeable, trusting and open to ideas. "They know how to take gains and how to take losses," said Joan Jones of A. G. Edwards & Sons in Baltimore. "They know how to say thank you. That's not what a lot of people do." But just as there are good clients, there are bad ones.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1995
The Howard County Department of Social Services is offering free bus rides to its clients from Dobbin Center in east Columbia to the agency's new offices in the Gateway Industrial Park off Route 175.As part of the service, the agency also will give rides to the County Government Gateway Building, where other county agencies that help low-income, elderly and disabled residents are housed.The bus service -- offered through a contract between the social services department and the non-profit Urban Rural Transportation Authority -- began yesterday.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A PICKER | August 24, 1992
This week I had lunch with a former client who wanted some advice. Since we had last worked together, new competitors had entered his organization's market, sources of funding were drying up, and his client base was showing signs of jumping ship. "What should I do?," he asked in desperation."Have you asked your clients?" I responded. "They're the first ones you should be asking that question."For all the pearls of wisdom that radiate from consultant gurus, none shines as bright or is as valuable as what your own clients can tell you. The trouble is that non-profits -- and most for-profit ventures, too, for that matter -- simply do not ask.Whether it's total quality management or some other client-centered approach, every successful venture starts with the client or customer.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | June 29, 1993
Mark Orrell winces when he sees people who keep coming to the fitness center, don't slack off, put heart into their workouts, but are doing the wrong exercises.The 34-year-old exercise physiologist and personal trainer said he would like to help, but it wouldn't be fair to the client paying him if he took off to work with someone else. And his usual workday at Marriott Corp.'s corporate fitness center in Bethesda is one client after another, all day on his feet, grab a sandwich standing up.Mr.
NEWS
By Keith Bradsher and Keith Bradsher,New York Times News Service | February 5, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Robert E. Rubin, a former co-chairman of Goldman, Sachs & Co. who is President Clinton's top economic adviser, sent a letter in December to many of his clients urging them to continue doing business with the investment banking firm and to stay in touch with him at the White House.A copy of one of the letters, on Goldman Sachs stationery and signed by Mr. Rubin, assures a Japanese client that Goldman Sachs can continue to work closely with the client despite his departure."I am confident that Goldman Sachs will continue to work as well or even better with" the company, Mr. Rubin wrote, "given the strength of trust and the bond of mutual respect between our organizations."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1999
An administrator for a Catholic Charities program that assists senior citizens in managing their affairs, including their finances, has resigned after an internal investigation showed funds missing from clients' accounts.Officials from Catholic Charities, the social welfare arm of the Archdiocese of Baltimore, said they became aware on June 10 of irregularities in the Social Security accounts of several clients.The accounts were managed by Wanda Wilson, a program administrator for Catholic Charities' Congregate Housing Services, which provides meals, homemaker services, personal care and case management to eligible elderly residents of five senior citizen residences run by Catholic Charities and three privately owned complexes.
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