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By Laura Vozzella | June 8, 2011
Message from Bruce Bereano to rival Annapolis lobbyists: Forget about scooping up his clients. He's not dying. He's just on a diet. The prominent Annapolis arm-twister has dropped 61 pounds in seven months. He feels better than ever, but fellow lobbyists have mistaken svelte for sick. "Any smell of a health problem, they immediately go to the client list and get ready," Bereano said. "I’m sure I disappointed a lot of them. I’m alive and well and kicking. It’s a cold, heartless world, lobbying.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 8, 2014
Merrill Lynch made business page headlines this year by appointing Baltimore County native Cynthia Hutchins to the newly created post of director of financial gerontology. Ms. Hutchins is charged with teaching the company's nearly 14,000 financial advisers how to talk to baby boomer clients about more than stocks and bonds - to help those planning to end their working lives understand the complexities and the realities of retiring. It is a smart move. More than 42 percent of the average financial advisor's client base is of baby boomer age, and another 36 percent is older than 67. It helps if you understand what they are experiencing.
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FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
The first time Lindsay Fitch-Alexander-Alexander heard about professional organizing, she thought, "Wouldn't that be the best thing ever?" Several years and many piles of paper later, the Catonsville pediatrician and mother of two hired Mary Cate Claudias, owner of Charm City Organizers, to help her manage the paper flow. "I have young kids in school with papers coming in and had a desk and computer area drowning in a sea of paper," she says. Claudias initially helped her sift through her home office area, creating systems that would allow her and her family to stay organized over time.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Milton K. "King" Hill Jr., a well-known Baltimore trial attorney who enjoyed sailing the Chesapeake Bay and Magothy River, died Sunday at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He was 87. "What a great guy. I started my career with him when I worked as a summer law clerk for Smith, Somerville and Case, which in those days in the 1970s was a top-notch trial law firm," said U.S. District Judge Richard D. Bennett. "I owe my career to King Hill. He got me into the courtroom early, and I was very fortunate to work with him. " "He epitomized a trial lawyer," said Ann Barbara Spicer, who worked with Mr. Hill at Smith, Somerville and Case after she joined the firm in 1965 as a young lawyer.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2011
A contractor accused of stealing from clients was acquitted of two counts of theft scheme Wednesday, after an Anne Arundel County judge said the cases turned on civil, not criminal, law, and that criminal penalties wouldn't apply. Gregory L. Haigis, 51, of Arnold was found not guilty by Judge Laura S. Kiessling in a nonjury trial that began Monday. Prosecutors dropped three other charges in April. Clients claimed Haigis took money for work that was not completed, asked them for more money and did a shoddy job. "The judge indicated these cases were controlled by contract law," said David P. Putzi, Haigis' attorney.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2010
Sandy Hillman Communications, a public relations agency based in Towson, launched a new service where clients seeking limited help on a tight deadline could pay hourly rates for such tasks as writing and distributing news releases, e-mail blasts and media alerts. The firm said it has received repeated requests for short-term assistance from smaller companies and nonprofits during the past year. The new service, called prXpress, guarantees that the work will be done within 48 hours of the request.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2010
The bonding company for a defunct homebuilder is paying $460,000 to Maryland consumers who weren't refunded the deposits they'd made for new homes that were never built, the state attorney general's office said Tuesday. Arch Insurance Co. — the bonding company for Equity Homes — has handed the money over to the attorney general's Consumer Protection Division, which will handle the consumer claims. The Fairfax, Va.-based Equity Homes, which closed in 2008, was building in Prince George's and Montgomery counties, the state says.
NEWS
September 4, 2013
Along life's long and twisting road, Sheri Bell found a straight course that led to bliss. It manifested itself during the 24 years she spent as an addictions counselor at the former Reality Inc. on Main Street. And while the facility is gone, has been gone for two years now, replaced two years ago by Hope House Treatment Center, the memories she compiled appear to be woven into her DNA. It was a defining chapter, she offered, a job that she can't help but compare to every other job she's held or will hold.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2001
M. Cristina Gutierrez, one of the Baltimore area's most ferocious criminal defense lawyers, has agreed to her own disbarment, marking the end of an accomplished law career. The state Court of Appeals ordered her "disbarred by consent" May 24, after Gutierrez agreed to resign rather than fight complaints filed against her with the state Attorney Grievance Commission, which investigates allegations of wrongdoing by lawyers. Reached by telephone yesterday at her home in Towson, Gutierrez, 50, said she suffers from multiple sclerosis.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
Police investigating whether Harford County payroll company AccuPay stole years of tax payments rather than sending them to tax collectors on behalf of clients warned Monday that potential victims might number in the hundreds. An investigation by the Bel Air Police Department is in the early stages and likely will involve multiple agencies, a spokesman said. Potential victims could include any business that hired AccuPay to handle its payroll and remit its state and federal taxes, the spokesman said.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
A law professor who is teaching Maryland's public defenders to better serve their poor clients amid "crushing" caseloads is among the winners of this year's MacArthur Foundation "genius" grants. As founder of the Atlanta-based organization Gideon's Promise, Jonathan Rapping works to train public defenders and help reform what he considers civil rights abuses in the criminal justice system. He arrived in Baltimore in May for a year-long stint at the Maryland Office of the Public Defender, his first attempt at changing a statewide system.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
A Baltimore non-profit organization that works to reduce infant mortality in the city lost its federal funding and may shut its doors, the group said Monday. Baltimore Healthy Start Inc. reported the nearly $2.5 million was most of the annual budget, used for programs in Rosemont, Edmondson Village, Sandtown/Winchester, Middle East and Highlandtown. The largely African American communities have higher infant mortality rates. For the first time this year grants were awarded as part of a competitive process that considered evidence-based approaches to improving women's health and access to care and improving and tracking the quality of services provided, among other areas, Health Resources and Services Administration spokesman Martin Kramer said.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
A new state audit says Maryland's public defender's office is failing to properly document whether its clients are poor enough to need its help. The periodic review by the state's Office of Legislative Audits, released Thursday, also found the office is struggling with cost overruns and heavy workloads for attorneys, and needs to do more to put resources where they are most needed. Those findings and questions about client screenings have been raised in previous audits. The state Office of the Public Defender provides legal representation to poor people charged with crimes.
BUSINESS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
In the casino industry, they are known as "whales. " At Maryland Live, they are plied with personal parties, guaranteed seating at concerts, free tickets to sporting events and even quarterly car detailing. Helena Wong, a former VIP host at the Hanover casino, specialized in catering to those high rollers. So when her former employer suspected she had copied a list of its 1,000 best customers before taking at job a dozen miles away at Horseshoe Casino Baltimore, Maryland Live sued.
NEWS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
As baby boomers ebb out of the workforce and into retirement, financial advisers are helping wind down their clients' careers by preparing them for soon-to-be-reduced incomes. Meet Cyndi Hutchins, Bank of America Merrill Lynch's director of financial gerontology — one of the country's first such positions at a financial management firm. Her recent appointment marks the company's first foray into the science of aging. Hutchins works with other Merrill Lynch financial advisers to manage their clients' transitions into retirement.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | June 11, 2014
General Motors has fired 15 employees after an internal investigation into the company's handling of defective ignition switches that led to at least 13 fatalities. But the only way to stop lawbreaking at GM or any other big corporation is to prosecute the people who break the law. And so far, no one at GM has been prosecuted. "What GM did was break the law. ... They failed to meet their public safety obligations," scolded Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx after imposing the largest possible penalty on the giant automaker.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2010
Like other law firms, a fledgling legal practice in Annapolis is looking for clients. But this one is targeting clients who need but can't afford a lawyer, has a retired judge on the payroll and is being financially supported so it doesn't need to turn a profit. The law firm of Michelle J. Moodispaw teams the former public defender with Joseph P. Manck, who retired from the Anne Arundel County bench three years ago. The goal is to attract people who earn too much money to qualify for free legal services — that's a poverty-level income — but can't pay full freight.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 21, 1993
A good stockbroker is worth keeping. So imagine being separated from your favorite by a court order. It actually happened, says Mutual Fund Market News, a Boston newsletter.When a California broker left Merrill Lynch to join another firm, some of his top clients -- many of them friends and relatives -- decided to take their business with him.Not so fast, said Merrill Lynch.When Merrill hired the broker, he signed an agreement stating that, should he switch firms, he would not contact his Merrill Lynch clients for at least a year after his departure.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
Baltimore-based marketing firm Groove said Monday that it's acquired a local company as part of a larger growth strategy. Groove, which handles web design and e-commerce as well as marketing, did not disclose the terms of its purchase of Oomph Marketing, also based in Baltimore. The deal will broaden Groove services in areas such as brand strategy and multimedia work while giving Oomph clients more access to digital services. "We thought it would be a natural fit," said Groove CEO Ethan Giffin.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
Legg Mason Inc. reported that clients added more than $8 billion in cash to accounts at the Baltimore money manager during its recently finished fiscal year, breaking a six-year streak of client cash flowing the wrong way — out. Legg's net income more than doubled in the January-through-March period compared with a year earlier, boosted by the rising assets under management and lower costs. The company reported a $68.9 million profit for the three months, up from $29.2 million a year earlier — when the company took a multimillion-dollar expense hit while consolidating offices.
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