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By Karen Nitkin, knitkin@verizon.net | October 11, 2011
Crab Shanty, a family-owned Ellicott City landmark since 1978, is changing its menu, its look, even its name. "The changes had to happen," said William C. King III, who founded the restaurant with his father, William King Jr. "We have to attract a different clientele to stay in business. " Work began earlier this month and is expected to continue through early November. Outdoor seating will be added, the bar area will be made larger, and new colors, chairs and lighting will brighten the inside.
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By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
This fall, 11-year-old Shayna Slatkin will start middle school. Before her first class, she and her mother will cover all the usual bases: shopping for new notebooks, pencils and erasers - and visiting a spa for a new look. Shayna, who lives in Baltimore, is a client at Salon & Spa Kids, a Pikesville hair salon and day spa that caters to the youthful set. With bright colors and scaled-down furniture, the salon provides a welcoming environment for preschool to high school-age kids, who can relax with a DVD as they get a haircut or lounge in a butterfly pedicure chair during spa treatments.
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By Baltimore Sun Staff | June 16, 2011
The family that owns Cibo's Bar & Grill hase filed a federal lawsuit against landlord David S. Brown Enterprises Ltd. and three of the company's employees, alleging racial discrimination against the Owings Mills restaurant. Alessandro, Rinaldo and Sergio Vitale claim in 26-page suit filed last Friday that Brown workers — Howard Brown, Lee Sachs and Carmella Bell — forced Cibo's out of business over the past decade after its clientele became majority African-American, and then scuttled the restaurant's sale to a black couple.
NEWS
By Mary K. Tilghman, mtilghman@tribune.com | July 8, 2014
The first Maserati models have arrived and ground is due to be broken this week for a new showroom that will open this fall in Towson. The Maserati showroom, along with a new state-of-the-art showroom for BMWs, are part of a $4 million expansion now taking place on BMW of Towson's property at 700 Kenilworth Ave., according to Marc Cohen, vice president of Priority 1 Auto Group, which operates the Towson dealerships, as well as the MINI dealership which...
NEWS
November 16, 1995
Simon H. Rifkind, 94, a famously versatile lawyer whose clientele included Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, needy Holocaust survivors and Municipal Assistance Corp., died Tuesday in Manhattan.
NEWS
July 8, 1998
Gary Zorn of Admiral Envelope & Printing Co. Inc. has been appointed to a three-year term on the board of Hospice of the Chesapeake.Admiral Envelope & Printing Co. Inc., at 122 North Langley Road in Glen Burnie, serves a clientele in Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia.Pub Date: 7/08/98
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 30, 1999
A lawsuit by four African-Americans, including Sun art critic Glenn McNatt, alleging racial discrimination by J. Brown Jewelers, has been settled for an undisclosed sum.The settlement was reached after Monday's opening day of what had been expected to be a two-week trial before U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin in Baltimore. The terms and conditions of the settlement are to remain confidential and each party is "to bear its own costs," court records show.McNatt and three co-defendants had charged that they were denied immediate access to a now-closed J. Brown store on downtown North Charles Street because of their race.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1998
Lania D'Agostino, one of Baltimore's busiest plastic surgeons, works in a dirty, dusty studio on Canton's waterfront. She operates without anesthesia, without her clients' consent and without a medical degree.Her patients are all dummies. They have to be to seek her expertise.D'Agostino makes her living improving the appearances of manhandled mannequins and creating new ones for a diverse clientele -- from backyard gardeners to museum curators.Her shop, on the fourth floor of the old Broom Factory on Boston Street, is a cluttered cross between a warehouse and the laboratory of a mad scientist.
NEWS
May 28, 1993
THE PRESIDENT may have a lot to learn about how to squelch controversy, but his restaurant of choice apparently has that lesson down cold.When McDonald's unveils a major national promotion Tuesday to tie in with the coming summer movie hit, "Jurassic Park," the fast-food chain will offer customers "collectors' cups," "dino-sized sandwiches" and banners proclaiming that Mickey-D's is the "official visitors center of Jurassic Park."The one tie-in it won't offer is dinosaur toys, which is ironic in that A.)
NEWS
By [ELIZABETH LARGE] | July 29, 2007
FORM 1115 W. 36th St., Hampden / 410-889-3116 / formtheboutique.com Open 11 a.m-6 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 10 a.m-7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, noon-5 p.m. Sunday When Aimee Bracken decided to open her own high-end fashion boutique, she brought something different to the table. Instead of having a buyer's background, she was an art director and graphic designer. Her new shop and the clothes in it reflect her taste and her design sense. Form isn't a boutique you'd expect to find in Hampden, which is best known for its funky, eclectic stores.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
A panel of advisers to an established senior center on the edge of Mount Vernon is protesting a proposal to lease space in its city-owned building to Baltimore's gay community center. The Waxter Center Advisory Council fears younger patrons of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore could disturb older patrons of the building's senior center, which has been in operation for nearly 40 years, said Lester Buster, president of the advisory council. "We just don't know whether or not that will be a good mix," said Buster, 79, of West Baltimore.
NEWS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
This spring's season at Pimlico includes attractions designed to renew long-fading interest in thoroughbred horse racing: live music, a wine festival, beer and bourbon tastings, tutorials on betting and special contests. Get them to come once, the thinking goes, and spectators will be hooked on the experience. For the first time since the mid-2000s, Pimlico Race Course is poised to become more than an off-track betting center maintained just enough to host one of the country's most important races - the Preakness Stakes.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
Baltimore's Lexington Market proudly calls itself the oldest continuously operating public market in the nation — and home to some of the best crab cakes in the world at its famed Faidley's Seafood cafe. Yet even a venerable landmark that's been in business since 1785 needs an occasional upgrade. That's why the announcement last week of plans for a $20 million to $25 million renovation of the market is welcome news for everyone who values its historical significance. But simply making cosmetic changes to the building's interior won't be enough to attract new vendors and customers to the site.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2012
The street-level restaurant space at Pratt and Light streets has lain vacant since a Legal Sea Foods pulled out more than four years ago. That's a long time for an Inner Harbor space to sit empty, especially with Harbor East beckoning diners to its dense crop of glitzy restaurants. Now, the anchor spot at 100 E. Pratt St. is alive again. Since opening there in early March, Brio, a chain based in Columbus, Ohio, has in short order managed to liven up its location more than its predecessor ever did. Brio has done more than just occupy a moribund space; it has energized it. The outdoor seating already has the solid look of something permanent, a space that's ready for company.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
A Federal civil rights lawsuit brought by the owners of the bygone Cibo in Owings Mills claims its former landlords,  David S. Brown Enterprises, Ltd., raised their rent and harrased them with maintenance fees as it began to attract more black patrons, the Daily Record reports today. The lawsuit brought by Cibo's owners, Rinaldo "Aldo" Vitale and his sons, Sergio and Alesssandro, alleges that the landlord's agents "made deragatory comments about Cibo's customers, referring to them as an "undesirable element," the story reports.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun Staff | June 16, 2011
The family that owns Cibo's Bar & Grill hase filed a federal lawsuit against landlord David S. Brown Enterprises Ltd. and three of the company's employees, alleging racial discrimination against the Owings Mills restaurant. Alessandro, Rinaldo and Sergio Vitale claim in 26-page suit filed last Friday that Brown workers — Howard Brown, Lee Sachs and Carmella Bell — forced Cibo's out of business over the past decade after its clientele became majority African-American, and then scuttled the restaurant's sale to a black couple.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
Baltimore's Lexington Market proudly calls itself the oldest continuously operating public market in the nation — and home to some of the best crab cakes in the world at its famed Faidley's Seafood cafe. Yet even a venerable landmark that's been in business since 1785 needs an occasional upgrade. That's why the announcement last week of plans for a $20 million to $25 million renovation of the market is welcome news for everyone who values its historical significance. But simply making cosmetic changes to the building's interior won't be enough to attract new vendors and customers to the site.
NEWS
March 9, 1994
"The timing was perfect," said Susan Keating, president of NationsBank Maryland. Indeed, it was.NationsBank was looking to make a bold statement about its commitment to the community as it absorbs the venerable Maryland National Bank, which it acquired last year.Meanwhile, the Baltimore Children's Museum was looking to move from the Cloisters, a Gothic castle tucked away in Baltimore County, to a more visible spot near the bustling Inner Harbor.This convergence of desires led to a $3 million donation from the North Carolina-based financial institution, its largest single gift ever, to the children's museum effort.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | sam.sessa@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 26, 2010
Two years ago, when Cat's Eye Pub owner Tony Cushing died, Fells Point bar lovers wondered what would become of the classic Thames Street haunt. The Cat's Eye stood for all that was great about historic Fells Point: the mix of rough-and-tough old-timers and yuppies, the daily lineup of sharp bar bands and the snug, wipe-but-don't-scrub decor. Cushing's son, Tony, who had moved back to Baltimore to pitch in with the pub several years before his father died, stepped up and became a co-owner.
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