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NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF | August 1, 1993
The British Broadcasting Corporation wants to get rid of its cliches with a new style book aimed at banning tired phrases. At The Baltimore Sun, getting rid of just one cliche, such as "the bottom line," might be as tough as cleaning up the Chesapeake.Since 1990, Sun and Evening Sun writers, letter and other writers and subjects used the accountants' phrase, "bottom line" (the point of something) 2,094 times. In a July 1993 sampling of 50 examples, Sun story or headline writers used the phrase 16 times; others or people quoted were guilty the other 34 times.
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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2013
- Come up with all the sports cliches you can think of involving the number three and they probably apply to Sunday night's NCAA women's lacrosse championship between No. 1 Maryland and No. 3 North Carolina. Third time's the charm. It's hard to beat a good team three times. Three strikes and you're out. They all work. Only once before have the Division I finalists met for the third time in a single season. Maryland, aiming for its 11th NCAA championship and its 12th national title, has defeated the Tar Heels twice already this spring, 14-13 in the regular season and 12-8 in the Atlantic Coast Conference final.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | October 25, 1994
"People are as fragile as they are dominant. We are all at the mercy of free will," says Adam Anderson, the tortured Generation X-er who is the central character of the Michael Stern-John Brenkus film "Crimson Lights."But such epiphanies don't come cheap; not in life and, in this case, not in the movies either.An aspiring writer in name only, Adam lives indolently; cheesing shamelessly off Samantha, his book editor girlfriend who has had it with his lack of productivity.Yet he is a hyper-achiever compared to his friend Bobby, a boozing, broken-down football player whose soul gave out with his knees.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | April 26, 2013
I usually roll my eyes when I hear someone say that a player "plays like a Raven. " But in the case of Florida safety Matt Elam, the team's first-round pick, I can't help but nod my head. It sounds as if the Ravens agree. “I started to watch Matt, and I've never been so excited. It was fun watching him play,” general manager Ozzie Newsome said late, late Thursday night. “It's been a long time. Watch play after play on tape, and you just go, 'Wow. Oh, wow.' … The way he played on tape is the way that you have to play in the AFC North.” At 5-foot-10, Elam is a little shorter than what you would like at the safety position, but he runs fast, hits hard and loves football, according to Newsome.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 1, 1992
The English language has not gone to pot. It's not on a slow boat to China. It's not going to hell in a handbasket.We have this from the horse's mouth.The horse is a noted lexicographer who believes with all her heart that cliches, while as old as the hills, can be as fresh as daisies.Christine Ammer, the lexicographer and a good conversationalist to boot, has just compiled "Have A Nice Day -- No Problem! A Dictionary of Cliches" (Dutton, $25). She has listed 3,000 of 'em, defined 'em and found out where they came from.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT and MILTON KENT,SUN REPORTER | July 13, 2006
It was New Year's Day 1998, a day for new beginnings, when Mike Hasselbeck and his brother and his uncle all got on the same page while watching the Rose Bowl, the granddaddy of them all. Hasselbeck and his posse took their thinking outside the box by noticing how often Keith Jackson and Bob Griese, the ABC announcers, invoked well-known expressions during the telecast. Soon enough, Hasselbeck started compiling a list of the cliches. It didn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that he could go for the gold, hit pay dirt and touch 'em all by creating a Web site of all the hoary phrases and expressions that sizzle through the sports consciousness like a hot knife through butter.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | April 28, 1996
IN HIS 1995 book, ''What Comes Next,'' James P. Pinkerton describes a White House meeting in early 1989, in which he and other policy wonks were trying to flesh out George Bush's promise to be ''the education president.''The meeting dragged into the night. ''As my mind started to lTC wander,'' he recalls, ''I imagined that the bureaucratic buzzwords, sports metaphors and flakes of stale imagery being tossed about the room were solid objects -- and that I could see them bounce off the white-plaster walls and plop down on the wall-to-wall carpeting.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | August 19, 1991
Degas made great art out of dance pictures, but there are not many artists like Degas. And so an exhibit titled "Art of the Dance," at a gallery known for its conservatism, sounds like a prescription for cliches.But that isn't completely the case at the Life of Maryland Gallery's newly opened show (through Oct. 25). It's true that most of these dance-inspired works are more or less traditional, and some of the selections are confused, amateurish or just plain boring. But others, even if not stunningly new, can be admired on their own terms.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 20, 2006
Flags of Our Fathers purports to tell the story of Marines raising Old Glory on Iwo Jima and the iconic photo that was snapped of the event during the battle to take the island during World War II. The film has all the coherence and lucidity of a fragmentation bomb.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 27, 2007
Nearly four years ago, Kelly Clarkson declared herself "Miss Independent" in a hit from Thankful, the 2003 debut released after she became American Idol's inaugural winner. In that time, it seems as if the singer and budding songwriter has absorbed the defiant sentiment of that song. After feuding publicly with RCA President Clive Davis, firing her management and canceling a much-publicized summer tour - all within the past month - the native Texan is distancing herself musically from her shiny pop persona.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
The repetitions of ritual are the point. They establish continuity and reassurance through familiarity. So you can be sure that you will hear "O Come, All Ye Faithful" at the late-night service on Christmas Eve, that you will eat the same holiday dinners,* that you will make the same toasts. And that is exactly as it should be. Unfortunately, in journalism the resort to trite language appears to be understood as an honorable ritual rather than as a failure of imagination. So, for those who have ears to hear, I repeat today the annual Holiday Cautions.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | May 16, 2012
Ever since No. 1 seed Loyola easily dispatched of Canisius and Denver bounced No. 8 seed North Carolina from the NCAA tournament last Saturday to set up this Saturday's quarterfinal, the sentiment within the lacrosse community appears to have settled on the improbability of the Greyhounds being able to beat their Eastern College Athletic Conference rival for the third time this year. Color Pioneers coach Bill Tierney unimpressed. “Don't buy it,” he said Tuesday. “Don't buy that stock.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
At the Fork & Wrench, the new bar/restaurant in Canton, spirits are laid out in an antique general-store display case. The beer flows from a custom-made, steampunk-esque tap. Old-time woodworking tools hang throughout the bar for effect, and cute knickknacks abound - a raised shelf filled with secondhand books here, old matchboxes tucked away there. There are porcelain dolls and misshapen canteens and vintage photographs. It all looks very pretty, but it also looks very tired.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
Earlier today I became aware that that insipid Christmas song, “The Little Drummer Boy,” which I have loathed these many years, was running in my head and would not stop . Mild and even-tempered a fellow as I am, a virtual milquetoast, I could not help but reflect how gratifying it would be if the composer, lyricist, arranger, musicians, and everyone involved in the publication, production, dissemination, and broadcast of that song were set...
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | October 18, 2011
The thing about "The Thing" is that even an unnecessary remake can claim your attention. Amonster from outer space attacking scientists at an Antarctic outpost has a way of doing that. Following in the alien footprints of the 1951 and 1982 versions, this remake emphasizes the bleak isolation that turns human beings into an endangered species. Of course, these particular humans often behave in such foolish ways that an argument could be made on behalf of the alien determined to eliminate this inferior life form.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 9, 2009
Middle-class marital strain makes women svelte and focused, men doughy and awkward, and everybody stupid. That's the inadvertent message of "Couples Retreat," which finds it as impossible to locate a laugh in glittering Bora Bora as it was for Operation Enduring Freedom to nail Osama bin Laden in gritty Tora Bora. Some of the finest comic actors of their generation, including Jason Bateman (as a character named Jason), Jon Favreau (Joey) and Vince Vaughn (Dave), go up in tropical-restaurant flames as husbands who vacation with their wives at the Eden resort in French Polynesia, run by Jean Reno's "couple whisperer" Marcel.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 17, 1998
Only one of the three one-act comedies being presented at the Spotlighters is actually about cliches. But in a sense, they all are, since each puts a new spin on a cliched situation.The tone for this trio of Baltimore Playwrights Festival offerings is set by the opener, Mark Scharf's clever 10-minute sketch, "Like White on Rice," which is written entirely in cliches.Ten minutes of cliches might not seem to amount to much. But Scharf's singular achievement is that, using everything from worn-out pick-up lines ("What's a nice girl like you doing in a place like this?"
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2002
When it comes to stepping up and taking the fight against sports cliches to a new level, there's nobody you'd want pounding away at the keyboard in crunch time more than columnist Gene Collier of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Collier, who always gives the matter 110 percent, recently released the winner of his Trite Trophy, which dishonors the year's worst sports cliche. Some previous winners: Throwback, Gut Check, They Went To The Well Once Too Often, Mentality Of A Linebacker, Smashmouth Football, Red Zone, Eight Men In The Box, Walk-off Homer.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 15, 2009
Sugar is a near-great movie with qualities more unusual than some all-time classics. It resists cliche at every turn and puts something solid in its place: raw yet controlled observation that gives the film the form of a flexing muscle. The writing-directing team of Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck tell the fresh, enlivening story of a baseball player, Miguel "Sugar" Santos (Algenis Perez Soto), who progresses from a Dominican Republic training camp to spring training in Arizona and then to Single-A ball in Bridgetown, Iowa.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | March 17, 2009
"Body of work" popped up all of a sudden but then just as quickly became annoying. How many times did we hear that one during CBS' NCAA tournament selection show Sunday evening? ( For more, go to baltimoresun.com/ mediumwell)
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