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Sports Digest | May 5, 2013
Pimlico Race Course Too Clever by Half wins fifth consecutive race Too Clever by Half won for the fifth consecutive time, taking the $52,000 feature at Pimlico Race Course . The 5-year-old mare was one of three turf winners on the card for jockey Sheldon Russell . Too Clever by Half dueled with Nistletoe for the lead in the five-furlong test on the grass and then opened up a clear lead in midstretch and dug under strong handling to...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Mr. Paul, the teacher explained, wanted to invite Miss Claire to a princess ball. For that, Tracy Aitken told her kindergartners at Hollifield Station Elementary, the high school senior needed their help. The 22 children colored in letters. When Claire Lorenz, 17, arrived for her regular volunteer shift, the kids hoisted them over their heads: "WILL YOU GO TO PROM WITH ME?" Nearby, Paul Lutchenkov, 17, stood with a bouquet. "I just had the perfect opportunity. I knew I had to go for it," the Mount Hebron senior said of his proposal, which he planned by email with Aitken.
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SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | January 23, 1995
The Charge of the Light Brigade.That's how one fan described the field in a $33,000 -- for fillies and mares yesterday when eight of the dozen horses, all within a length or two of the lead, fanned out across the track entering the stretch at Laurel Park.When the jockeys' screams had died down and their whips were at rest, two horses, Clever Rosey and Devil's Glen, stood out from the pack.With leading rider Mark Johnston aboard, Clever Rosey -- representing the entire one-horse stable of Laurel video store owner, Leonard Goldberg -- had defeated Devil's Glen, from Israel Cohen's expensive and fashionable 40-horse string.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
"Brief Encounter," David Lean's 1945 movie based on a Noel Coward play about a thwarted romance, has long been spoken of with great reverence and routinely accorded four-star status. Personally, I'd shave off a half a star, if only because the soundtrack is so overstuffed with Rachmaninoff's surging, sighing Piano Concerto No. 2. Still, count me among those who treasure the film. Count me, too, among those who find much to savor in the theatrical version of "Brief Encounter," created by the U.K.-based troupe called Kneehigh in 2008.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2000
The appetizers weren't the most nourishing fare imaginable, but a well-prepared main course paid ample tribute to a distinguished visitor whose own recipe graced the menu. No, you haven't turned to the food page, but these culinary metaphors describe the Annapolis Symphony's Camerata Chamber Concert given at Maryland Hall last weekend. That "main course" was "Voices from the Gallery," the musical museum tour for narrator and orchestra composed by Minnesotan Stephen Paulus. One of the country's most frequently performed composers these days, Paulus was in town for a week of teaching and consultation thanks to a prestigious American Symphony Orchestra League grant won by the local orchestra.
SPORTS
By SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 2000
After a five-horse scramble for the lead, Preston Moffett's Clever Gem emerged from the pack to post a 1 1/2 -length victory in yesterday's $50,000 E. William Furey Memorial Stakes at Laurel Park. Clever Gem is a 4-year-old son of Clever Trick. He was ridden by jockey Mario Pino for Pimlico-based trainer Mary Eppler. Clever Gem posted his second win in as many starts this year and is now seven for eight lifetime (with one third), with earnings of better than $180,000. The winner covered the seven furlongs in 1:22 3/5 over a fast main track.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff Correspondent Sun staff writers Ian Johnson and Ed Brandt contributed to this article | February 10, 1994
GUERNSEY, Channel Islands -- People come to these islands in the English Channel to shelter their money and their lives. And so, it seems, William Norman Clever, a middle-aged sailing wanderer, and Peter Ogden, a clever millionaire, found a common reason to be here.They both wanted privacy.Mr. Ogden, the founder of the largest computer sales company in Britain, is so publicity-shy that his own public relations officer says he doesn't know his age. He is said to be 46.The son of a trade union official, the Englishman did not come from the privileged class that tends to rise to the top in Britain.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | May 27, 1993
Some people would pay the NFL $170 million to stay away.The United Nations has set up a war crimes court to try the criminals with whom it hopes to negotiate.Harry Thomason's productions run the gamut from sitcom to farce to slapstick, but always with Bill as the fall guy.The clever Clinton administration made the U.S. attorneys quit two months ago and has nominated no replacements in a fiendish plot to have no prosecutions for the next four years.
NEWS
By George F. Will | January 25, 1998
''The name means absolutely nothing to me.''-- Alger Hiss, 1948 WASHINGTON -- Hiss' statement was artful, except for one thing: To a few alert people, it seemed artful. It did not quite answer the question, which was whether he knew Whittaker Chambers, who had testified to knowing Hiss while operating in the communist underground in the 1930s.The will to believe Hiss -- former clerk to Oliver Wendell Holmes, former State Department luminary, then head of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace -- was strong in Washington 50 years ago. However, to a few skeptics, Hiss' answer seemed suspiciously lawyerly, and suggested another question: Had Hiss known Chambers by another name?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1996
Baltimore's television stations should be producing a lot more shows like "Without a Doubt," the film version of this year's winner of WMAR's 14th annual drama competition for African-American writers.Not that the show is all that great. The script, by Donald Dankwa Brooks, is clever -- probably too clever, to the point where many viewers may tire of trying to follow it. The production is clearly a couple of notches below network television standards. And the acting, by members of Baltimore's Arena Players, is too stagey to work on the small screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
  UPDATE 9:50 a.m. Friday: A couple of hours after I posted this Thursday, the video went private.  I asked ESPN for help in getting a video readers could access. This morning, ESPN sent a version you can now play. ESPN has a lot riding on the addition of Ray Lewis to its NFL football package. And there's no guarantee the great linebacker is even going to be a good TV performer. But the sports channel started the launch today with a winning promo. The channel is selling "passion" with Lewis, and that can be a tricky deal, because sometimes passion plays too hot on what has been called a cool medium.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | May 5, 2013
Pimlico Race Course Too Clever by Half wins fifth consecutive race Too Clever by Half won for the fifth consecutive time, taking the $52,000 feature at Pimlico Race Course . The 5-year-old mare was one of three turf winners on the card for jockey Sheldon Russell . Too Clever by Half dueled with Nistletoe for the lead in the five-furlong test on the grass and then opened up a clear lead in midstretch and dug under strong handling to...
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2012
One of the teams the Orioles had to outlast to make the playoffs last season was the Tampa Bay Rays, and on Sunday night, the Rays made one of the biggest trades of the offseason. The Rays dealt right-handers James Shields and Wade Davis to the Kansas City Royals for outfielder Wil Myers, arguably the top hitting prospect in the game, and three other prospects - right-hander Jake Odorizzi, left-hander Mike Montgomery and third baseman Patrick Leonard. Rays manager Joe Maddon expressed his mixed reactions to losing Shields, the club's all-time leader in wins and strikeouts, and Davis, a reliever who would have been a back-end rotation starter on most teams, on Twitter, saying: “Hate … HATE to lose James and Wade.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
A new holiday commercial for the NBA features Baltimore's Carmelo Anthony and other hoops stars playing a most unusual instrument: basketballs. Using nothing but bouncing balls, Melo and the other players offer a rather amazing rendition of the Christmas classic "Carol of the Bells. " Suppose it's actually "Carol of the Balls. " Behold: jill.rosen@baltsun.com @BaltInsider on Twitter
NEWS
May 12, 2012
An alcoholic once said to a friend: "You should share your drink with me, because the Bible says 'do unto others as you would have them do unto you.'" What's missing here? The situational context. An abstract ethical principle requires thoughtful application if it is to be a legitimate basis for action. Our rhetorically-skilled president needs to explain how he sees Jesus' words apply to the historically unprecedented situation of redefining marriage to include same-sex unions.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
Often when an old home is in the final stages of an interior renovation, the grandeur of new molding, flooring and light fixtures stands out like a masterfully worked canvas awaiting the addition of the primary subject. Such is the story unfolding behind the new windows of the Alice and Mike Gosse's circa 1920 East Baltimore rowhouse, where the scarcity of furniture draws full attention to the quality of the detailed work completed. Just inside the front door, off a narrow hall, the entire first floor is open, extending little more than 15 feet wide and 65 feet long to the back wall of the home.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | December 7, 2006
Despite years of getting a steady diet of "nonjudgmental" attitudes from our educational system and the media, we have not yet lost all sense of right and wrong. Our elites may have, which might explain how anyone could have thought that O.J. Simpson's book about the murder of his ex-wife and her friend would be accepted by the public. Apparently the clever people who put this deal together thought that a few glib words would defuse any serious objections, and perhaps the few voices of outrage would be just enough to create more free publicity for the book.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 9, 1993
As far as most of the rock press is concerned, the trouble with Sting is that he's too clever by half. Indeed, he just about beats listeners over the head with his erudition, quoting Shakespeare and cribbing from Prokofiev in his songs. And since these are purportedly just pop tunes, more than a few critics have accused him of pretentiousness in the first degree.Sting, though, is more than clever -- he's also devilishly sly. So with his fifth solo album, "Ten Summoner's Tales" (A&M 31454 0070)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
It has all the weight and nutritional value of cotton candy. But "The Addams Family," the Broadway musical that has taken up temporary residence at the Hippodrome Theatre, adds up to a mildly entertaining package of song and shtick. Revised since its New York premiere, which received a drubbing from the press, the show provides a workable vehicle for the characters first immortalized by the Charles Addams cartoons and memorably brought to life by the 1960s TV series. Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice, who wrote the book, borrowed a well-used device to frame the musical — the comic collision of opposites.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | October 31, 2011
We haven't done a caption contest in a while, but we have a perfect storm for one this Halloween. The Ravens cheerleaders on Sunday continued their annual tradition of wearing Halloween costumes at M&T Bank Stadium , though I am sad to report that none were dressed up as a hot dog this year ( I'm sure I deserve most of the blame for that ). And we just received tickets to watch Mark Turgeon and his new-look Maryland men's basketball team play Notre Dame at the BB&T Classic at Verizon Center on Sunday, December 4, 2011.
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