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By New York Times News Service | April 27, 1992
Rap musicians have long been freely appropriating excerpts from other artists' recordings for their own use, a practice known as electronic sampling.But the non-profit organization that operates the Cleveland Orchestra contended Friday that Michael Jackson and Sony Music Entertainment Inc. had gone too far when they included a 1-minute-7-second segment of its recording of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony in Jackson's latest album, "Dangerous."In a complaint filed in U.S. District Court in New York City, the Music Arts Association of Cleveland conceded the music of Beethoven was no longer protected by copyright.
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June 11, 2014
Let's get this out of the way: A timpanist is that cool one in the orchestra who gets to bang on one of those huge drums in the back. Timpani has long been a big part of the life of 30-year-old James Wyman, now in his first year with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. When he was playing the piano at the age of 9, he was also playing the drum set. Moving on to percussion and timpani with youth orchestras in Cleveland, all it took was watching his teacher, Paul Yancich, the principal timpanist of the Cleveland Orchestra, to realize that timpani was for him. And this weekend, his timpani will be paired with a Hollywood classic, as the BSO performs live as "Casablanca" plays on the big screen (performances are Thursday and Friday at the Meyerhoff and Saturday at Strathmore)
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By David Donovan and David Donovan,Special to The Sun | September 25, 1994
Bruckner, Symphony No. 8 in A major. Bach/Webern, Ricercare, performed by the Cleveland Orchestra, Christoph von Dohnanyi, conductor (London 436-153-2)Dohnanyi continues to record the Bruckner symphonies, and this is another example of the beauty and power of the playing of the current Cleveland Orchestra. As he has done in his earlier Bruckner recordings, Dohnanyi, the Cleveland's music director, delivers a no-nonsense performance along classical lines. The conductor does best in the extroverted first, third and fourth movements.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
Longtime record collectors will have previous incarnations of releases in the 23-compact disc boxed set, "Leon Fleisher: The Complete Album Collection" from Sony Classical. Ultra-serious collectors, of course, will still have the original LPs from the 1950s and '60s weighing down shelves (artwork and liner notes from those vinyl days are reproduced here on the CD sleeves). But it's still great to have Fleisher's recorded legacy on the Columbia Masterworks/Epic and Sony Classical labels gathered in one tidy box. Make that treasure-trove.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
Longtime record collectors will have previous incarnations of releases in the 23-compact disc boxed set, "Leon Fleisher: The Complete Album Collection" from Sony Classical. Ultra-serious collectors, of course, will still have the original LPs from the 1950s and '60s weighing down shelves (artwork and liner notes from those vinyl days are reproduced here on the CD sleeves). But it's still great to have Fleisher's recorded legacy on the Columbia Masterworks/Epic and Sony Classical labels gathered in one tidy box. Make that treasure-trove.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 1997
Any opening night is dramatic, but adding to the excitement at Maryland Hall this weekend will be the appearance of the first of four guest conductors vying to succeed Gisele Ben-Dor as principal conductor of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra.Stephen Smith, the 37-year-old assistant conductor of the world-class Cleveland Orchestra, opens this season's conductor's derby directing Beethoven's "Leonore" Overture No. 3, the second Horn Concerto of Richard Strauss and the hair-raising Fifth Symphony of Dmitri Shostakovich.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | October 10, 2006
That America produces great symphonic ensembles has long been demonstrable all across the country. But even with so much talent out there, there's something about the Cleveland Orchestra that separates it from the rest, even from the best. A combination of exceptional technical polish and artistic sensitivity characterize this ensemble, honed over the past 88 years by a stellar list of music directors that includes Artur Rodzinski, Lorin Maazel, Christoph von Dohnanyi and, above all (and for the longest period)
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH | October 5, 2006
Chamber music The lowdown -- The inaugural season of the University of Baltimore's Spotlight UB in the school's intimate new concert hall will include performances by artists from classical, folk and ethnic musical genres. The season opens on a classical note with the new BSO Musicians Series, featuring members of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in two riches of the chamber music repertoire, Schubert's String Quintet in C major, D. 956, and Brahms' Piano Quintet in F minor, Op. 34. If you go -- The concert will be at 8 p.m. Saturday in the fifth-floor concert hall of the Student Center at 21 Mount Royal Ave. Tickets are $15-$20.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 30, 1995
Bela Bartok, "Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta"; Bohuslav Martinu, Concerto for String Quartet and Orchestra; Leos Janacek, "Capriccio" for piano left hand and chamber ensemble. The Cleveland Orchestra, conducted by Christoph von Dohnanyi; the Cleveland Orchestra Quartet (Daniel Majeske and Bernard Goldschmidt, violins; Robert Vernon, viola; Stephen Geber, cello) in the Martinu; Joela Jones, piano (in the Janacek). London 443 173-2.This superb recording by our finest orchestra of three 20th-century masterpieces contains the first performance of Bartok's "Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta" to challenge the supremacy of Fritz Reiner's 1958 account with the Chicago Symphony (RCA Victor 09026-61504-2)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | October 18, 1991
Andre Watts went toe to toe against the Brahms Piano Concerto No. 2 last night. Had it been a contest by Marquess of Queensberry rules, a referee would have stopped it -- Brahms took an awful mauling. But crowds love blood, and the Meyerhoff Hall audience adored the way Watts battered the piece in his performance with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and guest conductor Hans Vonk.Watts' strategy was clear from the beginning: Put the pedal down and play as loudly as possible. It's not easy to describe Watts' sound when he plays out (which is most of the time)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2011
When he was in his early teens, Andrew Grams saw the sci-fi hit "Jurassic Park. " The visual side of the movie wasn't the only thing that left an impression. "The trumpet theme from the score stuck in my head for the entire summer," said Grams, the Maryland-born conductor who, now in his early 30s, will lead the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra this week in music from that film and others scored by John Williams. "Hearing the music today takes me back," he said, "and I hope it will do that for other people, help them remember who they were when they first saw the movie and heard the music.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | October 10, 2006
That America produces great symphonic ensembles has long been demonstrable all across the country. But even with so much talent out there, there's something about the Cleveland Orchestra that separates it from the rest, even from the best. A combination of exceptional technical polish and artistic sensitivity characterize this ensemble, honed over the past 88 years by a stellar list of music directors that includes Artur Rodzinski, Lorin Maazel, Christoph von Dohnanyi and, above all (and for the longest period)
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH | October 5, 2006
Chamber music The lowdown -- The inaugural season of the University of Baltimore's Spotlight UB in the school's intimate new concert hall will include performances by artists from classical, folk and ethnic musical genres. The season opens on a classical note with the new BSO Musicians Series, featuring members of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in two riches of the chamber music repertoire, Schubert's String Quintet in C major, D. 956, and Brahms' Piano Quintet in F minor, Op. 34. If you go -- The concert will be at 8 p.m. Saturday in the fifth-floor concert hall of the Student Center at 21 Mount Royal Ave. Tickets are $15-$20.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 23, 2004
PHILADELPHIA - Applause broke out as soon as musicians of the Philadelphia Orchestra started filing onstage Tuesday night at the Kimmel Center, packed with dressy, champagne-lubricated patrons gathered to celebrate the opening of the season. Forty-eight hours earlier, it looked as if the players would be outside the theater, carrying picket signs. The sense of relief was palpable. A last-minute agreement averted a strike, when musicians and management extended the deadline on contract talks until Oct. 21 (saving the orchestra's nationally televised broadcast from Carnegie Hall Oct. 6)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 11, 2001
John Adams Century Rolls; Lollapalooza; Slonimsky's Earbox. Emanuel Ax, pianist; Cleveland Orchestra; Halle Orchestra; Christoph von Dohnanyi and Kent Nagano, conductors. (Nonesuch 79607-2) Back in the 1970s and early '80s, when minimalism really started making waves, many a sage predicted that the persistent repetition of small melodic motives, simple chords and propulsive rhythm patterns that characterized this musical style would soon fade away. It couldn't possibly last, or be taken seriously.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 11, 1999
The great game of musical chairs -- or, more accurately, of orchestral podiums -- has begun again. And everyone's guessing about who's going where.The classical music world buzzes with expectations every 10 or 12 years when the music directorships of one or more of the world's major orchestras becomes available. The last round in this sweepstakes occurred in the 1980s when the orchestras of New York, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Berlin and Chicago were up for grabs. This time the stakes seem even higher, partly because several job searches are taking place simultaneously and because the number of qualified contenders is smaller than ever.
NEWS
By Mary P. Johnson and Mary P. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 17, 1997
A professor who has taught conducting at the Eastman School of Music for the past 20 years and a 28-year-old rising star are among the four finalists to replace Gisele Ben-Dor as music director of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra.The finalists, who were chosen from 300 applicants, also include the assistant conductors of the Detroit and Cleveland symphony orchestras, Pat Edwards, chairwoman of the search committee, zTC said yesterday. Each will conduct a concert during the ASO's 1997-1998 season before the orchestra's board of directors makes a decision, she said.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | February 24, 1991
All recent recordings of the Schumann symphonies -- including original-instruments versions by Roger Norrington (EMI-Angel) and Derek Solomons (Collins) -- feature the lean, incisive style in Schumann that was pioneered by George Szell, rather than the more romantically inflected approach of Wilhelm Furtwangler and the late Leonard Bernstein.Among the best of the sons of Szell is David Zinman, who has recorded the symphonies on two Telarc discs with the Baltimore Symphony. It is good that these discs are separately available because the performances of Nos. 1 and 4 are better than those of Nos. 2 and 3. Part of the problem with the latter seems be tubby recorded sound -- the albums had different producers.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 1997
Any opening night is dramatic, but adding to the excitement at Maryland Hall this weekend will be the appearance of the first of four guest conductors vying to succeed Gisele Ben-Dor as principal conductor of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra.Stephen Smith, the 37-year-old assistant conductor of the world-class Cleveland Orchestra, opens this season's conductor's derby directing Beethoven's "Leonore" Overture No. 3, the second Horn Concerto of Richard Strauss and the hair-raising Fifth Symphony of Dmitri Shostakovich.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 3, 1997
If Jascha Heifetz was the greatest violinist of the century, then David Oistrakh (1908-1974) may have been the most beloved.No violinist ever cut a more unprepossessing figure. Oistrakh walked out on stage like a plump, kindly, Jewish tailor who was about to do nothing more than take measurements for a suit. But his presence was every bit as formidable in its modest way as that of the patrician Heifetz. Why this was the case is something I still don't understand. I can only report that Oistrakh made you love him even before he began to play.
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