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Cleopatra

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By Robin Westen and Robin Westen,Special to the Sun | February 14, 1994
No man can resist the seductress.Since the beginning of time, men have flown into the femme fatale's arms like bees to a honeysuckle.Once under her spell, smitten guys give her everything -- their hearts, their money, their health plan.Naturally, we'd all love to possess a little (or a lot) of the seductress in ourselves.What's her secret?Let's learn from history's hottest ladies:* CLEOPATRA. The last queen of Egypt, Cleopatra embodied decadence, cunning and exotic beauty.Historians say Cleopatra staged various forms of debauchery.
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NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | June 13, 2013
Shakespeare's "Antony and Cleopatra" is a funny sort of tragedy. Although its martial and amorous complications have deadly consequences, this play has a lot of jokes along the way. Indeed, the snake that the Egyptian queen uses to kill herself is delivered by an irreverent little servant who wouldn't be out of place in a "Saturday Night Live" sketch. This play's comic elements are zestfully brought out by Chesapeake Shakespeare Company in an outdoor production at Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park in Ellicott City.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | May 9, 2008
Cleopatra Franko, a retired Social Security Administration worker, died of heart failure Saturday at her Catonsville home. She was 84. Cleopatra Vasilakis was born and raised in Weirton, W.Va. She was a 1942 graduate of Weir High School and moved to Baltimore's Greektown neighborhood in 1947. Mrs. Franko, who had had been an office worker for Top's department store in Baltimore, later was a key punch operator for seven years at SSA headquarters in Woodlawn before retiring in 1984.
ENTERTAINMENT
By b staff | August 9, 2011
MTV is airing its fist-pumping-gone-Italian Season 4 of “Jersey Shore.” The most logical question is: Who on the show do you relate to the most?  Pauly. For saying “I'm not from around here,” when explaining why he couldn't unclog a toilet. I, too, make up pathetic excuses to get out of housework.  -   Luke Broadwater, managing editor,  b Danny, the Shore Store boss, because he actually got to fire Angelina, the most annoying of this overcooked, idiotic tribe.  -   Anne Tallent, editor,   b The duck phone because I'm hard to figure out.  -   Wesley Case, reporter,   b The grenade horn.  -   Jordan Bartel, assistant editor,   b I'll go with Ronnie's Dad. Cop mustache and crisp tan ... me in a nutshell.  -   Molly McLaughlin, intern,   b None of them!
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | January 22, 2005
THE OTHER NIGHT I heard that some classic movies would be exhibited at the Hippodrome next week before The King and I opens. Hmm, I thought, it's about time projectors were being turned on there. Cleopatra will be shown at 8 p.m. Thursday. It is a spectacle whose arrival in Baltimore I well remember, for reasons that have nothing to do with cinema art. (By the way, if you haven't been to the Hipp, a $7 movie ticket for Cleopatra or some of the other attractions sounds like a classic Baltimore bargain.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 22, 1999
I warned you, didn't I?When "Noah's Ark" debuted at the start of this dreadful month of "sweeps" excess, I said, "Stop Halmi, before he kills again."But, nooooooooooooo. You went ahead and watched executive producer Robert Halmi's "Noah" (with its God-as-Chatty-Cathy take on the Bible) in droves, and now Halmi's turning ancient Rome and Egypt into his big-budget, prime-time nutsiness with four hours of "Cleopatra" starting tomorrow night on ABC.Forget Cicero and "Gallia est omnia divisa into partes tres."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 27, 2005
The Maryland Film Festival hosts a varied series of unlikely blockbusters this weekend at the Hippodrome, starting tonight at 8 with Cleopatra, which at a price tag of $44 million in 1963 (equal to more than $270 million in 2005) makes it the costliest movie ever. Amazingly, the film made its money back, mostly because of the highly publicized off-set fireworks between Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor (they didn't quite translate to the screen) and the ineluctable pull and spectacle of the story.
FEATURES
By Deborah Bach and Deborah Bach,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2000
Valarie Perez Schere, tight yellow shorts over her black bathing suit, tattoos exposed and sunglasses perched on her head, paces poolside in Patterson Park, gesturing and throwing out directions to her cast like a hyped-up Martin Scorsese. The group listens as Schere, a redheaded fireball, describes the scene they're about to rehearse. Their decadent celebration interrupted by the approach of Octavian and his Roman army, the Egyptians jump in the pool, ready for battle. Mass carnage ensues before Mark Antony, believing his beloved Cleopatra is dead, offs himself dramatically with a sword.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2001
Genetics and hard work played their parts in bringing UMBC's Cleopatra Borel to tonight's shot put final at the NCAA's Division I track and field championships in Eugene, Ore. Borel, a senior from Mayaro, Trinidad and Tobago, has thighs that belong on an NFL fullback and a sense of balance that makes her look graceful even when performing the crude motion of throwing a steel ball that weighs nearly 9 pounds. Diligence keeps her grades at a 3.5 average (in pre-physical therapy), because she's studying when she's not training or working several part-time jobs.
NEWS
May 14, 2008
An obituary published Friday in The Sun for Cleopatra Franko inadvertently omitted the name of a son. She is also survived by Andrew T. Franko of Severna Park. The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Maggie Tennis, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
If you go "Cleopatra: The Search for the Last Queen of Egypt" runs through Jan. 2. The exhibit is open 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Wednesday and 9:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Thursday-Sunday. Tickets are $19.50-$29.50. Call 215-448-1148 or go to http://www.fi.edu. The Franklin Institute is at 222 N. 20th St., Philadelphia. Getting there Transportation: Driving is the cheapest choice. By car, Philadelphia is 90 minutes from Baltimore. Lodging: 11 area hotels are offering the Cleopatra VIP Hotel Package, which includes tickets and lodging for two, starting at $119.
TRAVEL
By Maggie Tennis, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
The story of Cleopatra has survived for thousands of years, despite the fact that her body and most of her possessions vanished shortly after her death. People have long been fascinated by Cleopatra's ascension to the throne in Egypt, her relationships with Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, and her tragic suicide. "Cleopatra: the Search for the Last Queen of Egypt," a new exhibit at Philadelphia's Franklin Institute, opens a window into her story and described the modern-day search for clues to her life.
NEWS
May 14, 2008
An obituary published Friday in The Sun for Cleopatra Franko inadvertently omitted the name of a son. She is also survived by Andrew T. Franko of Severna Park. The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | May 9, 2008
Cleopatra Franko, a retired Social Security Administration worker, died of heart failure Saturday at her Catonsville home. She was 84. Cleopatra Vasilakis was born and raised in Weirton, W.Va. She was a 1942 graduate of Weir High School and moved to Baltimore's Greektown neighborhood in 1947. Mrs. Franko, who had had been an office worker for Top's department store in Baltimore, later was a key punch operator for seven years at SSA headquarters in Woodlawn before retiring in 1984.
NEWS
May 4, 2008
On May 3, 2008, CLEOPATRA FRANKO (nee Vasilakis), of Baltimore, beloved wife of the late Thomas Franko, devoted mother of Andrew T. Franko (Peggy) and Michael A. Franko (Yvonne), loving grandmother of Vanessa, Andrea, Christina, Meara, Mahala, and Tadia, dear sister of Angie Mikedis and Thomas Vasilakis. Friends may visit at Barranco & Sons, P.A. Severna Park Funeral Home on Monday 2-4pm and 6-8pm, an Evening Memorial Service will take place at 6:30pm. Funeral Services will be held at Saints Constantine & Helen Greek Orthodox Church in Annapolis on Tuesday at 11am.
NEWS
July 30, 2007
On July 28, 2007, SIGFRIED, husband of Cleopatra. Friends may call at the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME EAST, 1101 E. North Avenue on Tuesday after 2P.M., where funeral services will take place on Wednesday at 12 noon.
NEWS
July 30, 2007
On July 28, 2007, SIGFRIED, husband of Cleopatra. Friends may call at the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME EAST, 1101 E. North Avenue on Tuesday after 2P.M., where funeral services will take place on Wednesday at 12 noon.
NEWS
April 22, 2004
On April 20, 2004, ARTHUR "TOM" GOVASTES; beloved husband of Cleopatra Govastes; father of Georgia, Mary, Eleni, and Donna; grandfather of Adrian, Dino, Nasia, Angelia, Elise, Jimmy and Sotiria; uncle of Mary, Dena, Connie, and Denise. Family will receive friends on Thursday, from 1 to 3 and 7 to 9 P.M. at the BRADLEY-ASTON-MATTHEWS FUNERAL HOME, INC., 2134 Willow Springs Road (at the corner of Dundalk Ave.), where Trisaghion Service will be held at 7:25 P.M. Funeral services will be held Friday, 10 A.M. at St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, 520 S. Ponca Street.
NEWS
October 5, 2006
Tamara Dobson, the Baltimore-born model-turned-actress best known for her leading role in two films as kung fu-fighting government super-agent Cleopatra Jones, died Monday at Keswick Multi-Care Center from complications of pneumonia and multiple sclerosis. She was 59. One of four children of a beauty shop operator and railroad clerk, Miss Dobson was a graduate of Western High School.
NEWS
By LYNN SMITH | April 23, 2006
Hollywood -- Cleopatra was the first. Then Titania, the fairy queen; Geruth, a Danish queen; Queen Charlotte in The Madness of King George; and the voice of the queen in the animated Prince of Egypt - oh, yes, and two reprisals of Cleopatra along the way. This year, actress Helen Mirren is about to extend a 42-year career sparkling with queenly parts with back-to-back roles as English queens - Elizabeth I and Elizabeth II. "It was an amazing experience to...
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