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NEWS
November 13, 1991
Governor William Donald Schaefer has awarded Clemens Crossing Elementary School a citation in recognition of the "superior" rating the school has received for the exceptional manor in which the school is maintained.The school was only one of six given the superior ratingby the State's Interagency Committee on School Construction's "Maintenance Report: Public School Buildings," presented annually to the Board of Public Works.HONOR STUDENTS INDUCTEDThe Glenelg Country School Chapter of the National Honor Society will induct newly elected members at an invitation ceremony Nov. 21.An all-Upper School reception will follow the initiation and former teacher Carla Winfield will speak.
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EXPLORE
April 12, 2013
I live in Clemens Crossing and am fortunate enough to be able to walk to my Giant. So off I went tonight to get a couple bags of groceries. On my way I passed a Mom and three kids at the tot lot. The little boy called to me from high on the swing. He had just called safely and successfully to a stranger! And then I noticed the two little girls were thrilled because they had just spotted a frog in the creek. On I went to then have a fun discussion with a man I had never met about his beautiful Great Dane.
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NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | September 13, 1995
Gregory and Dawn McBrien see rotting siding, peeling paint, deteriorating fences and other unsightly conditions they say are dragging down property values in their Clemens Crossing neighborhood.But Clemens Crossing resident Lisa Bishop sees working people trying their best to maintain their aging homes. And she charges that the McBriens needlessly anger their neighbors by reporting them for alleged violations of Columbia's property maintenance guidelines.The brewing dispute in Columbia's Hickory Ridge village is part of a much larger battle in the planned community over how to enforce the strict architectural guidelines -- maintenance standards for which the new town is recognized nationwide, but which many say increasingly are being ignored by residents.
EXPLORE
July 12, 2012
Clemens Crossing, 329; Kings Contrivance, 292 Medley Relays 15-18M: 1. CC (Mathieson, DeBoissiere, Solomotis, Elshafei), 2:02.57. 9-10M: 1. CC (Caine, Wilson, Oliver, Kelly), 1:17.27. 11-12M: 1. CC (Bridges, Elshafei, Eidson, Lew), 2:28.62. 13-14M: 1. CC (Panepento, Murphy, Saula, Yamamoto), 2:20.06. Individual Medley 15-18B: 1. Stenoien, KC, 1:00.04; 2. DeBoissiere, CC; 3. Hagerty, KC. 15-18G: 1. Cotter, KC, 1:07.19; 2. Elshafei, CC; 3. Solomotis, CC. 9-10B: 1. Matthew, CC, 1:37.70; 2. Baglione, CC; 3. DiValentin, KC. 9-10G: 1. Wilson, CC, 1:27.91; 2. Harris, KC; 3. Collins, KC. 11-12B: 1. Elshafei, CC, 1:08.76; 2. Woodson, KC; 3. Pena, KC. 11-12G: 1. Eidson, CC, 1:21.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Contributing Writer | January 5, 1994
Jacqueline Lazarewicz can't wait to go to work each morning."As I drive to work I actually get chills. I enjoy the successes of the students around me. I see the sparkle in their eyes. I love my job," the principal of Clemens Crossing Elementary School said.Dr. Lazarewicz was recently named Educator of the Year by the Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers, the statewide PTA organization, recognition that was based partly on her ability to involve parents in their childrens' education.
NEWS
By Fay Lande | July 9, 2003
Clemens Crossing Elementary School's "Change in Direction" Destination ImagiNation team competed in the program's Global Finals tournament at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, May 21-24. The fourth- and fifth-graders tied for 19th place out of a field of 48 teams competing to solve the "Change in Direction" problem at the elementary level. The problem required them to build a product, then transport, dismantle and rebuild it into something else. The children chose to transport a camera on a little electric cart they called a "spyangle" and then rebuilt it into a working hovercraft, said parent Marion Billek.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 1999
LAST WEEK, students and staff at Clemens Crossing Elementary School celebrated Earth Day with an elaborate event.Representatives from a variety of organizations set up 47 learning stations with experiments and displays on the school grounds. Each station included an ecological activity, a team-building exercise, an art activity or demonstrations relating to Earth Day.The event was planned by Clemens Crossing media assistant Gloria Konick."These children will be the keepers of the Earth," Konick said.
NEWS
By Liz Lean and Liz Lean,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 5, 1996
EVERYBODY'S favorite twister will touch down on the stage of Clemens Crossing Elementary School next week when nearly 100 students present the musical "The Wizard of Oz."The children have been practicing twice a week since January and are managing the sound, lighting, scenery and props, as well as singing, dancing and acting. Assistant Principal Tony Yount directs.Performances are at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tuesday and June 12.Some of the major roles include Dorothy, Erin Ferguson; Scarecrow, Jennifer Weinreich; Tin Man, Daniel Bergin; Cowardly Lion, Rebecca Sachs; Wicked Witch of the West, Laura Tyler; Glinda, the Good Witch, Tierra Brown; Wizard of Oz, Evan Cooper; Toto, Erica Finkel; guard, Patrick Nairn; mayor of Munchkinland, Mark Seifter; and lead Munchkins Jackie DesRoches and Maria Martirano.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff writer | March 3, 1991
Clemens Crossing parents didn't just ask the school board not to move their children from Clarksville to Wilde Lake Middle School. They brought a carefully researched alternative proposal to Thursday's public hearing on redistricting.Other speakers at the school board hearing sought additional portable classrooms for Guilford Elementary School; "reunion" of children from Sebring. Woodleigh and Hawthorn subdivisions with Clemens Crossing; no transfer to Pointer's Run for Clemens Crossing Elementary School students; and redistricting of Dunloggln Middle School students to fill Harpers Choice Middle.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | May 3, 1993
Next year will usher in a new program at Clemens Crossing Elementary School: daylong kindergarten.Some 20 kindergartners will get the chance to attend the program as part of a three-year, school-based management pilot project the Board of Education recently approved for the school. It is the first county school to offer a daylong kindergarten program."We've been wanting and wanting to try it, and now we have our opportunity," said Principal Jacqueline Lazarewicz, adding that her community had been clamoring for a full-day program for years.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,sun reporter | June 17, 2007
It's 4 p.m. on a sunny day, and most of the students and staff at Clemens Crossing Elementary School are long gone. Not Tom Brzezinski, who is busy preparing for the afternoon's main event -- a showing of the Robin Williams film Jumanji. After carting a 16 mm projector to the back of the school's cafetorium, he carefully closes the velvety, baby-blue curtains and lowers the large screen. He then draws an "X" on the bottom of several cups of popcorn, which will designate student prize-winners.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 5, 2006
How many of you have been to Assateague, author Larry Points asked the youngsters who were sitting cross-legged on the floor in the media center of Clemens Crossing Elementary School. About half the children raised their hands. Then he asked how many of the kindergartners, first-graders and second-graders had been to Ocean City. Many more hands stretched in the air. Points, co-author of several children's books about Assateague and the former chief of park interpretation at the Assateague Island National Seashore, urged the children to visit the island next time they were in Ocean City.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 2004
When Kevin Mulroe, a gifted-and-talented resource teacher at Clemens Crossing Elementary School, imparts knowledge to his pupils, he hopes that they use the information to help themselves and others. "I want them to be able to go out and live the American dream, and to be able to give back to the community," he said. "I want them to share their gifts with others." Mulroe, 31, was a finalist this month for the Maryland Teacher of the Year award sponsored by the state Department of Education.
NEWS
By Fay Lande | July 9, 2003
Clemens Crossing Elementary School's "Change in Direction" Destination ImagiNation team competed in the program's Global Finals tournament at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, May 21-24. The fourth- and fifth-graders tied for 19th place out of a field of 48 teams competing to solve the "Change in Direction" problem at the elementary level. The problem required them to build a product, then transport, dismantle and rebuild it into something else. The children chose to transport a camera on a little electric cart they called a "spyangle" and then rebuilt it into a working hovercraft, said parent Marion Billek.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 28, 2002
FACES SHINING with anticipation and a little angst, children and parents clustered outside Clemens Crossing Elementary School for the first day of school Monday. Schoolchildren and staff members were eager for a new year of challenges and opportunities. Hickory Ridge resident John Lefkowitz escorted his son, Zack, 6, who acknowledged being a little bit nervous on his first day of second grade. "Zack likes school," Lefkowitz said. "He's excited about it." He asked his son, "Aren't you?"
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2002
AS ITS members move on to middle school, the fifth-grade class at Clemens Crossing Elementary School has left behind a beautiful legacy - stained-glass windows designed by the pupils themselves. Seven stained-glass panels now frame the school's front doors. Stained-glass artist Donna Darcy worked with the children as an artist-in-residence on the project. Darcy is the owner of the Glass Key, a stained-glass supply store and studio in Jessup. Funded in part by a grant from the Howard County Arts Council, the project cost more than $7,500.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2002
A band of seven children is taking over the world. Youths from Clemens Crossing Elementary School in Columbia are attacking continents, oceans, asteroid caves - even a space station. Although it sounds as if they are playing a computer game, their task is far more complex. They recently performed a game of their design at the Maryland Destination ImagiNation Festival of Creativity. Destination ImagiNation (DI), an international competition, promotes creative problem solving. The nonprofit group creates five new "challenges" each September.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 2002
For many, the Shakespearean experience begins and ends with a fleeting glimpse of Hamlet or Macbeth in high school. The bard seems firmly relegated to academe, his eloquent writings reserved for the scholarly and learned elite - much to the relief of those of us who struggle to distinguish a thee from a thou. Well, the pupils at Clemens Crossing Elementary School have news for you - Shakespeare is for kids, too. Last week, a troupe of fourth- and fifth-graders performed a 20-minute portion of A Midsummer Night's Dream in its original language at Folger Shakespeare Library Theatre in Washington as part of the 23rd Emily Jordan Folger Children's Shakespeare Festival.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 2002
For many, the Shakespearean experience begins and ends with a fleeting glimpse of Hamlet or Macbeth in high school. The bard seems firmly relegated to academe, his eloquent writings reserved for the scholarly and learned elite - much to the relief of those of us who struggle to distinguish a thee from a thou. Well, the pupils at Clemens Crossing Elementary School have news for you - Shakespeare is for kids, too. Last week, a troupe of fourth- and fifth-graders performed a 20-minute portion of A Midsummer Night's Dream in its original language at Folger Shakespeare Library Theatre in Washington as part of the 23rd Emily Jordan Folger Children's Shakespeare Festival.
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