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By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 13, 2005
I have an old clematis vine that comes up every year; it's in good shape. I collected quite a few seeds in the fall after they dried out, and I need to know how to plant and raise seedlings from these seeds. Propagating clematis from seed is not recommended, because most clematis are hybrids. A plant produced from seed may have some of the characteristics of the parent plant, but it would not be identical. In many cases, the results are disappointing. Clematis can also be propagated by division if yours is a clump-forming clematis.
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff | April 17, 2005
There are few garden sights more dramatic than an ancient stone wall blanketed in clematis blooms the size of dessert plates and in colors stolen from an Impressionist's paint box. After more than a decade of breeding, the colorful profusion of clematis is now available for smaller places: the patio, the deck or the balcony, or that cramped spot in a city garden. Raymond Evison, the courtly Englishman who is the much-decorated godfather of this plant, this season has introduced three hybrids for just such small spaces, as well as the RHS (Royal Horticultural Society)
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NEWS
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,Special to the Sun | May 27, 2001
With some amazement, I found the clematis I planted last year not only still alive, but flourishing this spring. Two of them were especially a surprise because they had caught the dreaded clematis wilt and died back to the roots. I had sighed and promptly given up on them. Now, however, they are bright green and curling up sturdy tendrils about 24 inches tall. Which brings us to another consideration for clematis: What are suitable companions for them? Clematis are quintessential clinging vines and are born to run rampant over some other plant if ever a plant was, adding to the other's glory.
NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 13, 2005
I have an old clematis vine that comes up every year; it's in good shape. I collected quite a few seeds in the fall after they dried out, and I need to know how to plant and raise seedlings from these seeds. Propagating clematis from seed is not recommended, because most clematis are hybrids. A plant produced from seed may have some of the characteristics of the parent plant, but it would not be identical. In many cases, the results are disappointing. Clematis can also be propagated by division if yours is a clump-forming clematis.
NEWS
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,special to the sun | April 23, 2000
I never met a clematis I didn't like. Perhaps you too are easily smitten by masses of early spring blooming Clematis montana, looking like butterflies in flight. Or you're someone who swoons over the velvety, claret-colored 'Niobe.' And of course the classic, purple-blue 'Jackmanii' sprawling in abandon over a porch railing is to die for. Infatuation has not been a problem. Getting the things to grow can be. Yet clematis is widely touted as a plant for all seasons, and rightly so. Whether you desire a knock-your-socks-off display or a more delicate effect, there is a clematis for you. "They're flying off the shelves," says Joel Gaydos, of Garland's Garden Center in Catonsville.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | July 8, 2001
Q. Every year my annual verbena becomes covered with a white powdery substance that I assume is powdery mildew disease. What can I do to avoid the disease? Can it be treated? A.Powdery mildew is a fungal disease that is difficult to avoid when conditions are favorable for it. Some cultivars of annual verbena are less susceptible to powdery mildew than others; however, the problem is generally so serious that I do not recommend annual verbena for planting in our area. I would recommend planting the perennial verbena 'Homestead Purple.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | February 15, 2004
Can you tell me something about the perennial called Heliopsis? Does it grow well in Baltimore? The plant you are referring to, Heliopsis helianthoides, is most commonly called false sunflower. You should have no problem growing it here. It is native to most of the East and Midwest and can be seen growing along roadsides, open fields and other natural areas. It can also make a fine garden plant. False sunflower grows to about 4 feet tall and, true to its name, produces bright yellow ray flowers from mid-summer into fall.
NEWS
September 6, 1993
* Robert Zeppa, 68, a surgeon who developed a life-saving operation for cirrhosis patients, died on Thursday in Miami of a pulmonary embolism. He was president of the American Surgical Association in 1990-91, chairman of the American Board of Surgeons in 1982-84 and the recipient of a distinguished service award from the American College of Surgeons in 1990. In the late 1960s, he and Dr. Dean Warren developed the distal splenorenal shunt as a treatment for cirrhosis. The operation diverted blood from a damaged liver to avoid potentially deadly bleeding from that organ.
NEWS
By Carol Stocker and Carol Stocker,Boston Globe | June 22, 2003
Horticulturist Mary Ann McGourty has a slide program on vines that begins with a New Yorker cartoon of a wife standing at the front door while her husband is outside being chased around the house by a runaway vine. She's shouting, "Look out! Here it comes again!" Some vines are invasive and should never be planted. Still, many people like the space-saving attributes and vertical accent that vines can bring to a garden. The trick is to choose the right one. You have to balance your desire for something quick-growing (who likes to wait?
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | August 16, 1992
Vines give me the creeps. I don't trust them. Vines grow too fast and they always want to grab onto things. Mostly they stick to walls and trees, but who knows? I couldn't sleep if I thought vines were scrambling up the side of my house.My mother shares my concern. A 40-year veteran of the `f honeysuckle wars, her goal is to drive the stubborn vines from her yard. But the honeysuckle won't die. Two new plants appear for every one she digs up.To Mom, vines are the boogeymen of the botanical world.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | February 15, 2004
Can you tell me something about the perennial called Heliopsis? Does it grow well in Baltimore? The plant you are referring to, Heliopsis helianthoides, is most commonly called false sunflower. You should have no problem growing it here. It is native to most of the East and Midwest and can be seen growing along roadsides, open fields and other natural areas. It can also make a fine garden plant. False sunflower grows to about 4 feet tall and, true to its name, produces bright yellow ray flowers from mid-summer into fall.
NEWS
By Carol Stocker and Carol Stocker,Boston Globe | June 22, 2003
Horticulturist Mary Ann McGourty has a slide program on vines that begins with a New Yorker cartoon of a wife standing at the front door while her husband is outside being chased around the house by a runaway vine. She's shouting, "Look out! Here it comes again!" Some vines are invasive and should never be planted. Still, many people like the space-saving attributes and vertical accent that vines can bring to a garden. The trick is to choose the right one. You have to balance your desire for something quick-growing (who likes to wait?
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | July 8, 2001
Q. Every year my annual verbena becomes covered with a white powdery substance that I assume is powdery mildew disease. What can I do to avoid the disease? Can it be treated? A.Powdery mildew is a fungal disease that is difficult to avoid when conditions are favorable for it. Some cultivars of annual verbena are less susceptible to powdery mildew than others; however, the problem is generally so serious that I do not recommend annual verbena for planting in our area. I would recommend planting the perennial verbena 'Homestead Purple.
NEWS
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,Special to the Sun | May 27, 2001
With some amazement, I found the clematis I planted last year not only still alive, but flourishing this spring. Two of them were especially a surprise because they had caught the dreaded clematis wilt and died back to the roots. I had sighed and promptly given up on them. Now, however, they are bright green and curling up sturdy tendrils about 24 inches tall. Which brings us to another consideration for clematis: What are suitable companions for them? Clematis are quintessential clinging vines and are born to run rampant over some other plant if ever a plant was, adding to the other's glory.
NEWS
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,special to the sun | April 23, 2000
I never met a clematis I didn't like. Perhaps you too are easily smitten by masses of early spring blooming Clematis montana, looking like butterflies in flight. Or you're someone who swoons over the velvety, claret-colored 'Niobe.' And of course the classic, purple-blue 'Jackmanii' sprawling in abandon over a porch railing is to die for. Infatuation has not been a problem. Getting the things to grow can be. Yet clematis is widely touted as a plant for all seasons, and rightly so. Whether you desire a knock-your-socks-off display or a more delicate effect, there is a clematis for you. "They're flying off the shelves," says Joel Gaydos, of Garland's Garden Center in Catonsville.
FEATURES
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 22, 1996
As a civilization we have come a long way from our roots, literally and figuratively. Most of society thinks this a good thing, and is content to be as far from the mud and dirt of crude planetary existence as possible. They are not really interested in where food comes from, as long as it comes from the supermarket and looks nice and doesn't dent their pocketbook too much. Flowers are all very well, but mowing grass and clipping a few shrubs is pretty much the limit of involvement many wish to admit to. After spring comes air-conditioning.
FEATURES
By Amalie Adler Ascher | October 6, 1990
Vines -- a tangled undergrowth or a climbing beauty lush with opulent blossoms and rich foliage.Naturally, it's the second kind you'd want in your garden, so for guidance on how best to choose and use vines, I called Baltimore landscape architect Catherine Mahan, principal in thefirm of Catherine Mahan and Associates Inc.It was the memory of the vines I had seen in her small townhouse garden some years back that led me to seek her advice. Their arrangement and color infused the garden with a feeling of warmth and intimacy that made you want to stay in it forever.
FEATURES
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 22, 1996
As a civilization we have come a long way from our roots, literally and figuratively. Most of society thinks this a good thing, and is content to be as far from the mud and dirt of crude planetary existence as possible. They are not really interested in where food comes from, as long as it comes from the supermarket and looks nice and doesn't dent their pocketbook too much. Flowers are all very well, but mowing grass and clipping a few shrubs is pretty much the limit of involvement many wish to admit to. After spring comes air-conditioning.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | July 28, 1995
MINE ENEMIES prosper.Sun shines and greenbrier grows. Rain falls; wild clematis riots. Summer is a bummer, and the honeysuckle out back is a noxious shroud.Mary says, amiably, "A weed is just a plant in the wrong place." In the side yard, out of curiosity, she was tolerating two unidentified soaring objects; they were 9-feet tall when a recent storm knocked them over.There is a subcategory of literature called gardens, or gardening. In its pharmacologically unreal prose, and artwork, all the world's abloom; nothing grows except the prim, the dainty, the perfectly behaved.
NEWS
September 6, 1993
* Robert Zeppa, 68, a surgeon who developed a life-saving operation for cirrhosis patients, died on Thursday in Miami of a pulmonary embolism. He was president of the American Surgical Association in 1990-91, chairman of the American Board of Surgeons in 1982-84 and the recipient of a distinguished service award from the American College of Surgeons in 1990. In the late 1960s, he and Dr. Dean Warren developed the distal splenorenal shunt as a treatment for cirrhosis. The operation diverted blood from a damaged liver to avoid potentially deadly bleeding from that organ.
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