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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2012
In D.C., Chief Cathy L. Lanier is getting some heat for what the Washington Post reports is a "statistical mishmash" regarding the Metropolitan Police Department's sparkling homicide clearance rate of 94 percent of its 108 killings. As it turns out, many of the closed cases are from previous years: In Baltimore, this revelation is not new or surprising, but it's worth reminding the public how the process works. First, here's some snippets from the Post article: A 94 percent closure rate would mean that detectives solved 102 of them.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
The call to the county homicide detective came in the middle of the night. A man had been gunned down at a bus stop on Eastern Boulevard in Essex. Found on the scene, the victim's cellphone held a message from someone named Ashley. It read simply, "You dead. " Like most homicide victims in Baltimore County, Robert Holiday knew his killer. Witnesses willingly spoke to investigators and testified in court. The result: three convictions in a year and a life sentence for Holiday's former girlfriend, Laquesha "Ashley" Lewis.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2013
Baltimore County police reported 23 homicides in 2012 with all but three cases solved. The county's average homicide clearance rate was 89.8 percent from 2007 through 2011, above the national average of about 65 percent, according to a statement from the department. In 2012, 12 victims were killed in domestic-related incidents, while three were killed by acquaintances, three were killed in non-random, drug-related incidents, the statement said. In five cases, police had not found a clear relationship between the victim and the suspect.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2013
Baltimore County police reported 23 homicides in 2012 with all but three cases solved. The county's average homicide clearance rate was 89.8 percent from 2007 through 2011, above the national average of about 65 percent, according to a statement from the department. In 2012, 12 victims were killed in domestic-related incidents, while three were killed by acquaintances, three were killed in non-random, drug-related incidents, the statement said. In five cases, police had not found a clear relationship between the victim and the suspect.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2000
In the squad room of Baltimore's famous homicide unit, the murder board is back, telling a more upbeat story. For years, the wall-sized Formica board symbolized Baltimore's losing battle with violence, captivating viewers of the TV show "Homicide: Life on the Street." Yet frustrated police leaders viewed it as demoralizing, a reminder that killings in the city had spiraled out of control. They removed it two years ago. "It got to be a morale factor," Detective Maj. Robert M. Stanton, commander of the homicide unit, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2000
In a sign that the Baltimore Police Department's change of strategy is working, preliminary statistics show that detectives are solving far more homicide cases this year, sharply reversing a downward trend in recent years. Statistics released this week show an 18 percent increase in the number of homicide cases solved this year, compared with the same period last year. Through arrests or the finding of justifiable motives such as self-defense, detectives have solved 82 percent of city homicides, including more than half of the 171 slayings that have occurred this year, police said.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2000
Thanks to a dramatic drop in robberies, violent crime in Howard County decreased by 10.3 percent in the first quarter of this year, county police said yesterday. The statistics show that 36 robberies were reported between January and March, compared with 69 in the same period last year. No homicides were reported in the first quarter of this year; last year there was one in the first three months. "Hopefully, we can continue the trend," said Sgt. John Superson, a police spokesman. Police credit a new robbery unit and a special assignment section with helping to reduce the number of street crimes.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | September 23, 2009
In some places, it's rare to hear "crime" and "good news" spoken in the same breath. Not, apparently, in Baltimore County. For 13 years, county officials have been able to point to steady, if not always huge, declines in most acts of crime. That's something to crow about, and the county executive, James T. Smith Jr., wasted no time Tuesday in doing just that, proclaiming "impressive drops" in most so-called serious crimes in the first six months of this year, compared with the corresponding period in 2008.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
Baltimore County ended 2011 with 30 homicides — a spike from the 20 killings in 2010. Still, police say, the homicide tally is one of the lowest in recent years and not a cause for alarm. Police spokeswoman Elise Armacost said 2010 was "an anomaly. " "That was a very low year. It's important to look at the circumstances behind each of these crimes. We're not seeing any increase in random crime. Almost all of these homicides involve people who knew each other," Armacost said.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2001
Stymied by several puzzling killings this year, the Baltimore County Police Department's homicide unit is on pace for its lowest homicide clearance rate in six years. Detectives have solved two-thirds of the 21 homicides reported this year in the county. But they have been unable to determine who is responsible for two strangling deaths and one fatal stabbing - all involving women - or who shot two men at an Owings Mills apartment complex. Two other homicides - one in which a man was shot while sitting in his car outside his Milford Mill apartment, the other involving an Essex man shot in front his home - also remain unsolved.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2013
Baltimore was unable in 2012 to sustain a significant milestone — the first drop below 200 homicides in a generation — but officials see reasons to remain optimistic that declines will resume. As the Police Department's leadership changed, the city recorded 217 killings, about 10 percent more than the 197 in 2011, but still the second-lowest homicide rate since the late 1980s. Police statistics released Tuesday show that total crime and most categories of gun violence continued to decline.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
As the investigation into Violet R. Ripken's abduction stretched into an eighth day, police remained silent Wednesday about their leads - a strategy Harford County State's Attorney Joseph I. Cassilly said could ensure the potential suspect doesn't destroy evidence or intimidate witnesses. Investigators on the 40-person Aberdeen police force, Cassilly said, must find a balance in publicly releasing details that will help solve the case but will not provide any advantage to the man believed to have abducted the 74-year-old mother of Orioles legend Cal Ripken Jr. and widow of former manager Cal Ripken Sr. "I hope that we're successful; that's all I say," Cassilly said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
Angela Holland seems to know just about everyone in her North Baltimore neighborhood. She jokes with a guy hanging out of the window of an apartment high-rise. She consoles the deli counter man at the East 25th Street corner store, who's distraught about losing his mother two years ago. Without saying a word, she slips a few quarters to a man sitting on a stoop, who in turn hands her a cigarette. These folks know her. And some of the people in this neighborhood, she suspects, also know who killed her son, 22-year-old Jerry Isaac.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2012
In D.C., Chief Cathy L. Lanier is getting some heat for what the Washington Post reports is a "statistical mishmash" regarding the Metropolitan Police Department's sparkling homicide clearance rate of 94 percent of its 108 killings. As it turns out, many of the closed cases are from previous years: In Baltimore, this revelation is not new or surprising, but it's worth reminding the public how the process works. First, here's some snippets from the Post article: A 94 percent closure rate would mean that detectives solved 102 of them.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
Baltimore County ended 2011 with 30 homicides — a spike from the 20 killings in 2010. Still, police say, the homicide tally is one of the lowest in recent years and not a cause for alarm. Police spokeswoman Elise Armacost said 2010 was "an anomaly. " "That was a very low year. It's important to look at the circumstances behind each of these crimes. We're not seeing any increase in random crime. Almost all of these homicides involve people who knew each other," Armacost said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | December 29, 2011
Baltimore police have made an arrest in the killing of a 50-year-old man whose body was set on fire in April, and court documents appear to offer some insight into the tougher requirements new State's Attorney Gregg Bernstein has imposed on city homicide detectives.  Eugene Emmett Bates, 36, was indicted last week and charged in the death of Elmore Rembert, who police say was killed during an argument as the pair used drugs in a vacant home...
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,melissa.harris@baltsun.com | October 26, 2008
More than a month after former city councilman Kenneth N. Harris Sr. was murdered, his case remains unsolved - highlighting a nagging problem for Baltimore police. Despite a sharp drop in homicides this year, city police are solving murders at the second-lowest rate in 28 years, according to a Sun analysis of police and FBI statistics. In the 1980s, the department routinely solved more than 70 percent of its cases, but so far this year, the rate is 45 percent. The steady decline in the department's record of catching killers has left hundreds of homicides unresolved.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson | April 2, 2010
The number of reported crimes in 2009 in Anne Arundel County declined by 7 percent - or 4,551 incidents - from the previous year, county police said Thursday. More serious crimes, which include murder and non-negligent manslaughter, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, thefts including motor vehicle theft, and arson, decreased 8 percent, from 20,352 in 2008 to 18,714 in 2009. Lesser crimes, such as drug offenses, gambling, prostitution and weapons offenses, decreased from 43,410 in 2008 to 40,497 in 2009 for a 7 percent decrease.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Baltimore police have made an arrest in the killing of a 50-year-old man whose body was set on fire in April, and court documents appear to indicate an effort by the Police Department to be more deliberate in building cases. Eugene Emmett Bates, 36, was indicted last week and charged in the death of Elmore Rembert, who police say was killed during an argument as the pair used drugs in a vacant home in the Booth-Boyd neighborhood of Southwest Baltimore. Bates is accused of setting the house on fire and stealing Rembert's truck.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2011
After conducting a nationwide search for a new leader for his vaunted but scuffling homicide unit, Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III instead looked inward to a trusted commander who hadn't even applied for the job. Bealefeld chose Lt. Col. Garnell Green, and in an interview the commissioner said Green would have his support to make changes he deems necessary. "I want progress," Bealefeld said. "At the end of the day, I don't have time for excuses. The mayor and the people of the city should expect that the homicide clearance rate improves.
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