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NEWS
July 12, 1994
The recent bank foreclosure on their Eagle Ranch farm may have ended the subdivision development dreams of Frank and Sharon Duncan in Harford County, but it provides a cautionary tale of misunderstandings about the the coverage of title insurance in real estate transactions.The couple borrowed on their farm to develop another rural parcel near Darlington, but their sale of lots was blocked by the claims of a son of a previous owner. That stopped the cash flow they counted on to finance the mortgage payments and accruing interest on the loans.
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NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2004
Mayor Martin O'Malley's ambitious plan to gain control of 5,000 abandoned properties has slowed considerably since January, when the city announced that it had nearly half of the properties in hand. Baltimore officials said at the time that they had gained clear title to 2,250 houses and vacant lots and expected to take an equal number by June. As of last month, however, the city has acquired only 33 more Project 5000 properties. Housing officials say the slower-than-expected acquisitions will not delay the project's ultimate goal, which is to return the properties to productive use. The city has begun offering some properties for sale even before it gains full legal control of them, with the assumption that the titles will be clear in time to complete the sales.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1996
Haunted by vandals and trespassers, most of the 23 abandoned buildings on the vacant half of Riverdale Village Apartments could be burned to the ground in training exercises by Baltimore County Fire Department, starting as early as next month.One family remains among the 452 units on the vacant half of the decaying World War II-era Middle River complex on Eastern Boulevard. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development foreclosed on that part of the property last month.That tenant will be gone in two weeks, county housing administrator Lois Cramer said.
NEWS
August 22, 1997
JUST BECAUSE the criminal justice system catches, convicts and sentences a swindler does not necessarily mean the thief's victims will be compensated.People can spend years filing lawsuits, obtaining court judgments and trying to collect, and still not get everything -- or anything -- owed them. Sometimes, the money disappears; often it is impossible to find.That is why it is hard for victims to get much satisfaction when someone admits in court to stealing money from them, particularly when the thefts come at vulnerable times.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | June 29, 1993
Christopher H. Hill, a former builder of luxury homes in Maryland, admitted yesterday to bilking homebuyers and a title insurance company of $3 million in a construction-loan scheme.Hill, 40, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Baltimore to one count of wire fraud and one count of mail fraud. A plea agreement with federal prosecutors calls for him to receive a prison term of 24 to 36 months at his Sept. 17 sentencing before DTC Judge Frank A. Kaufman.He was arrested by the FBI in an early-morning raid March 10 and is being held at the Talbot County Detention Center.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | June 29, 1993
Christopher H. Hill, a former builder of luxury homes in Maryland, admitted yesterday to bilking homebuyers and a title insurance company of $3 million in a construction-loan scheme.Hill, 40, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Baltimore to one count of wire fraud and one count of mail fraud.A plea agreement with federal prosecutors calls for him to receive a prison term of 24 to 36 months at his Sept. 17 sentencing before Judge Frank A. Kaufman.He was arrested by the FBI in an early-morning raid March 10 and is being held at the Talbot County Detention Center.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | June 29, 1993
Christopher H. Hill, a former builder of luxury homes in Maryland, admitted yesterday to bilking homebuyers and a title insurance company of $3 million in a construction-loan scheme.Hill, 40, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Baltimore to one count of wire fraud and one count of mail fraud. A plea agreement with federal prosecutors calls for him to receive a prison term of 24 to 36 months at his Sept. 17 sentencing before Judge Frank A. Kaufman.He was arrested by the FBI in an early-morning raid March 10 and is being held at the Talbot County Detention Center.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2004
Mayor Martin O'Malley's ambitious plan to gain control of 5,000 abandoned properties has slowed considerably since January, when the city announced that it had nearly half of the properties in hand. Baltimore officials said at the time that they had gained clear title to 2,250 houses and vacant lots and expected to take an equal number by June. As of last month, however, the city has acquired only 33 more Project 5000 properties. Housing officials say the slower-than-expected acquisitions will not delay the project's ultimate goal, which is to return the properties to productive use. The city has begun offering some properties for sale even before it gains full legal control of them, with the assumption that the titles will be clear in time to complete the sales.
NEWS
August 22, 1997
JUST BECAUSE the criminal justice system catches, convicts and sentences a swindler does not necessarily mean the thief's victims will be compensated.People can spend years filing lawsuits, obtaining court judgments and trying to collect, and still not get everything -- or anything -- owed them. Sometimes, the money disappears; often it is impossible to find.That is why it is hard for victims to get much satisfaction when someone admits in court to stealing money from them, particularly when the thefts come at vulnerable times.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2010
Attorneys for Maryland homeowners are asking the courts to dismiss hundreds of foreclosure cases that depended on paperwork submitted by so-called robo-signers on behalf of mortgage servicers. Civil Justice, a Baltimore nonprofit that specializes in foreclosure issues, made the request in motions filed last week in two cases. One motion asks that all Maryland foreclosure cases with documents signed by Jeffrey Stephan of GMAC Mortgage — including the Baltimore case in question — be tossed out. The other asks for the same treatment of all Maryland cases with documents signed by Xee Moua of Wells Fargo.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1996
Haunted by vandals and trespassers, most of the 23 abandoned buildings on the vacant half of Riverdale Village Apartments could be burned to the ground in training exercises by Baltimore County Fire Department, starting as early as next month.One family remains among the 452 units on the vacant half of the decaying World War II-era Middle River complex on Eastern Boulevard. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development foreclosed on that part of the property last month.That tenant will be gone in two weeks, county housing administrator Lois Cramer said.
NEWS
July 12, 1994
The recent bank foreclosure on their Eagle Ranch farm may have ended the subdivision development dreams of Frank and Sharon Duncan in Harford County, but it provides a cautionary tale of misunderstandings about the the coverage of title insurance in real estate transactions.The couple borrowed on their farm to develop another rural parcel near Darlington, but their sale of lots was blocked by the claims of a son of a previous owner. That stopped the cash flow they counted on to finance the mortgage payments and accruing interest on the loans.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | June 29, 1993
Christopher H. Hill, a former builder of luxury homes in Maryland, admitted yesterday to bilking homebuyers and a title insurance company of $3 million in a construction-loan scheme.Hill, 40, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Baltimore to one count of wire fraud and one count of mail fraud. A plea agreement with federal prosecutors calls for him to receive a prison term of 24 to 36 months at his Sept. 17 sentencing before DTC Judge Frank A. Kaufman.He was arrested by the FBI in an early-morning raid March 10 and is being held at the Talbot County Detention Center.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | June 29, 1993
Christopher H. Hill, a former builder of luxury homes in Maryland, admitted yesterday to bilking homebuyers and a title insurance company of $3 million in a construction-loan scheme.Hill, 40, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Baltimore to one count of wire fraud and one count of mail fraud.A plea agreement with federal prosecutors calls for him to receive a prison term of 24 to 36 months at his Sept. 17 sentencing before Judge Frank A. Kaufman.He was arrested by the FBI in an early-morning raid March 10 and is being held at the Talbot County Detention Center.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | June 29, 1993
Christopher H. Hill, a former builder of luxury homes in Maryland, admitted yesterday to bilking homebuyers and a title insurance company of $3 million in a construction-loan scheme.Hill, 40, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Baltimore to one count of wire fraud and one count of mail fraud. A plea agreement with federal prosecutors calls for him to receive a prison term of 24 to 36 months at his Sept. 17 sentencing before Judge Frank A. Kaufman.He was arrested by the FBI in an early-morning raid March 10 and is being held at the Talbot County Detention Center.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Raymond L. Sanchez and Liz Atwood and Raymond L. Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1990
The former president of Bay State Title Co. has pleaded guilty to misappropriating about $300,000 belonging to his company and to the Chicago Title Insurance Co. of Maryland.Howard L. Perlow, 37, of Talton Court in Pikesville, entered the plea in Baltimore City Circuit Court yesterday. Sentencing is scheduled for Nov. 23.Perlow had been charged with misappropriating more than $1.6 million, according to Assistant Attorney General Christopher J. Romano.But Arnold Weiner, who is Perlow's lawyer, said that most of that amount was used for third-party loans, which he argued did not constitute a misappropriation of money.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | December 18, 2005
Almost every cable TV real-estate guru pitches them as great moneymaking techniques: lease-option contracts, also known as "rent-to-own" programs. In some metropolitan areas, lawn signs, telephone poles and newspaper advertisements hawk them aggressively to modest-income and credit-challenged consumers who want to buy a home. Stripped to its basics, the lease-option concept is sound: Buyers who have imperfect credit histories or insufficient cash for a down payment on a standard mortgage can instead rent a house for one or two years, pay a fee to the landlord for the right to purchase the property at a set price during the lease term, and even have portions of the monthly rent count toward a down payment.
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