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By Edmund Sanders and Jeff Leeds and Edmund Sanders and Jeff Leeds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 2003
WASHINGTON - Clear Channel Communications Inc., the nation's biggest radio broadcaster, is trying to beat its rap as the media conglomerate that lawmakers love to hate. But it is an uphill battle. Last week, on the eve of Senate hearings on media consolidation, Clear Channel Chairman Lowry Mays and a newly hired lobbyist made the rounds on Capitol Hill, arguing that the acquisition-minded company - which controls more than 1,200 radio stations, including three in Baltimore, and the nation's biggest concert business - has done what Congress intended when it lifted radio station ownership caps via the 1996 Telecommunications Act. "Stations were going dark," said Andrew Levin, a former congressional aide who has been hired to make the radio giant's case.
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NEWS
August 28, 2013
Does the general public really oppose taxes on billboards that use publicly funded highways for free to advertise to drivers in cars that run on gas that is taxed ( "Clear Channel sues Baltimore, calls new billboard tax 'unconstitutional,'" Aug. 16)? I doubt that few beyond the well-heeled Outdoor Advertising Association really worry about a tax on Clear Chanel's billboards. Claims of the generosity of Clear Chanel by giving free billboards are like the admitting of foxes in the hen house.
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BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2000
Radio One Inc., a Lanham broadcaster targeting urban African-American audiences, is expected to buy about $1 billion worth of stations from Clear Channel Communications Inc. An announcement could come as soon as Monday, analysts said. The acquisition would bolster Radio One's standing as the biggest player in the urban-format radio market. Radio One owns 27 stations, including two of Baltimore's top-rated stations, WERQ-FM and WWIN-FM. Analysts said the rumored deal with Clear Channel would bring Radio One about 20 new stations.
NEWS
August 20, 2013
Once more our fine liberal politicians (city or state, as both are the same mutated species) have reached beyond the bounds of common sense and constitutional intent to fetter the perceived "money holders. " Let's go after those who have legitimately earned a dollar and squeeze out our percentage. Simple corruption. I have to laugh at the logic in Baltimore's billboard tax ("Clear Channel sues Baltimore, calls new billboard tax 'unconstitutional,'" Aug. 16): The billboard tax law states that "the Council has determined that outdoor advertising endangers public safety by distracting the attention of drivers from the roadway and may otherwise endanger the public health, safety, and welfare.
BUSINESS
By Mike Hughlett and Mike Hughlett,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 30, 2005
Clear Channel Communications Inc. joined the growing ranks of big media companies electing to break themselves up yesterday, posing the question of whether being so big was such a good idea after all. The answer is not clear, but the hype that drove media conglomeration in the 1990s has not lived up to its promise. San Antonio-based Clear Channel, the world's largest radio broadcaster, plans to spin off its live entertainment business and sell 10 percent of its outdoor advertising segment in a stock offering.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2004
Radio giant Clear Channel Communications Inc. has partnered with a Columbia company to begin the transition of 1,000 of its stations to digital - or "high definition" - broadcasting, which has been described as the biggest development in radio since the advent of FM. The move could help speed the industry's adoption of the technology, which offers CD-quality sound and screen data displays such as song titles and weather alerts. The company hopes to stave off a decline in listeners lured away by competing satellite radio, a paid service.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2004
When the sawdust settled two Saturdays ago, 16 city-owned trees had been cut down outside downtown Baltimore's 1st Mariner Arena - paid for by a billboard company that has blanketed the arena's facade with signs. City officials say billboard giant Clear Channel Outdoor did taxpayers a favor by removing the trees because some were sick and the roots of others posed a threat to concrete sidewalks. But critics say it is an example of the city caving in to a business that is insensitive to the beauty of trees.
FEATURES
By Bob Baker and Bob Baker,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 1, 2004
Howard Stern, who has been vowing to quit broadcasting in the face of regulatory and business pressure, took a more combative stance yesterday by announcing his return to the air in four of the six markets where the high-rated shock jock had been removed by radio conglomerate Clear Channel Communications. Stern's employer, Infinity Broadcasting Corp., shuffled programming at its San Diego, Pittsburgh, Orlando, Fla., and Rochester, N.Y., stations to make way for Stern's libido-charged morning show.
NEWS
October 2, 2002
Box office personnel walked off their jobs at the Mechanic Theatre yesterday, hours before the opening of the season's first show, 42nd Street. The breakdown with Local 868 of the union that represents ticket sellers for the Mechanic concerns the status of the box office manager, said David M. Anderson, president of the theater management group of Clear Channel Entertainment. Clear Channel believes the managers should be exempt from the union, Anderson said. However, Walter Cahill, an International Alliance of Theatrical State Employees official, played down that issue, saying, "It's an economic strike.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 30, 2003
HARRISBURG, Pa. - If you somehow missed the hundreds of waving flags and the signs that read "Ditzy Chicks" and "Deport the Anti-War Protesters," you couldn't escape it once Bob Durgin started talking. You knew you were in talk radio country. "I want to send a message to the war protesters," the talk show host told a cheering crowd of thousands on the steps of the state Capitol yesterday. "I'm not going to call them un-American ..." "Un-American!" someone yelled for him. "Traitors!" shouted another.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
Arguing that billboards should be protected as free speech by the First Amendment, media firm Clear Channel Outdoor has filed a federal lawsuit against Baltimore and its new billboard tax. Baltimore began imposing a tax last month on billboard advertisements within the city limits — $15 per square foot for billboards that electronically change images, and $5 per square foot for those that don't. City officials expect to take in about $1 million annually from Clear Channel, which has a near-monopoly on Baltimore's advertising market.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | July 25, 2007
Baltimore banned liquor ads from most billboards in 1994, but they popped up recently in Remington and Hampden. Neighborhood leaders complained last week, and Clear Channel Communications agreed to take them down. But neighbors shouldn't crack open the celebratory Smirnoff and Bud Ice just yet. Even though a lawyer for Clear Channel said the liquor billboards were some sort of mistake - "This was not a test case," he said. "It was an operational issue." - he also asserted that they were legal.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | May 5, 2007
NEW YORK -- Clear Channel Communications Inc.'s rejection of a revised buyout bid from Bain Capital Partners and Thomas H. Lee Partners LP is believed a signal that the private equity firms are headed for defeat at next week's shareholder meeting. Directors of San Antonio-based Clear Channel, the largest U.S. radio broadcaster, rejected Thursday a bid of $39.20 a share from Bain Capital and Thomas H. Lee, saying it wasn't materially better than a $39 proposal shareholders were poised to defeat.
BUSINESS
By Mike Hughlett and Mike Hughlett,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 30, 2005
Clear Channel Communications Inc. joined the growing ranks of big media companies electing to break themselves up yesterday, posing the question of whether being so big was such a good idea after all. The answer is not clear, but the hype that drove media conglomeration in the 1990s has not lived up to its promise. San Antonio-based Clear Channel, the world's largest radio broadcaster, plans to spin off its live entertainment business and sell 10 percent of its outdoor advertising segment in a stock offering.
FEATURES
By J.Wynn Rousuck and Edward Gunts | January 25, 2005
As it marks the one-year anniversary of its opening, the renovated Hippodrome Theatre has been a hit in most respects, but an under-performer in some others. During its first year, the theater generated $46.1 million in sales in Maryland, $39.6 million of which were in Baltimore City, according to preliminary figures from an economic impact study commissioned by Clear Channel Entertainment, which operates the theater, WestSide Renaissance Inc., and the Hippodrome Foundation. The figures include expenditures for catering, construction services during productions, hotel rooms, and fees to anyone providing a service on behalf of the Hippodrome, such as accountants.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2005
It's tempting to dig up an old cliche to describe Lenny Mays' line of work: It's a dirty job, but somebody's gotta do it. The veteran construction man from Columbus, Ohio - in town this week with the professional indoor motorcycle-racing circuit known as Arenacross - is doing what he and three crewmates do every week between late October and early March: turning 3 million pounds of local dirt into a bike racer's paradise of well-packed straightaways, banks...
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | August 29, 2004
WILM-AM, a tiny news-radio station that covers the Iraqi National Conference and the New Castle County, Del., Planning Board, deserves its valuable piece of the public communications spectrum. Clear Channel Communications, a $9 billion corporation that broadcast "humor" about anal sex last year with "sound effects of flatulence and evacuation," according to the Federal Communications Commission, does not. Now they are merging. Clear Channel said last week that it will pay $4 million to absorb WILM, which is based in downtown Wilmington, Del., and calls itself the only independent all-news station in the country.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 14, 2005
A federal judge has dismissed an equal-protection claim that sought to block the installation of billboards on 1st Mariner Arena. The decision this week by U.S. District Judge Andre M. Davis means that if Baltimore property owners who object to the billboards want to continue their lawsuit, they must pursue it in Baltimore Circuit Court. "Effectively, where we go from here is that we have a case based largely on Maryland zoning law," said James E. Carbine, the attorney representing several of the property owners.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 29, 2004
The Maryland Court of Special Appeals has upheld a Baltimore Circuit Court judge's dismissal of a lawsuit seeking to block the installation of billboards on 1st Mariner Arena. The appellate court affirmed an August 2003 decision by City Circuit Judge Albert J. Matricciani Jr., who had ruled that the state courts did not have jurisdiction to hear the lawsuit. The decision was filed Monday. Some Baltimore property owners - who objected to the large billboards on the arena, calling them an "eyesore" - had challenged the zoning change approved in 2003 by the City Council and the mayor.
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