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By Laura Vozzella | May 2, 2011
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NEWS
Staff Reports and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Dundalk Middle School administrators, students and staff learned at an awards ceremony Tuesday that recent litter clean-up efforts at the school netted them the grand prize - and a $4,000 environmental grant - in the first year of the county's Team BCPS Clean Green 15 Litter Challenge. County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, school Superintendent Dallas Dance and Education Foundation Director Debbie Phelps were at Dundalk Middle to announce that seven county public schools were winners in the campaign, which resulted in more than 3,200 volunteers participating in more than 300 clean-ups around the county.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | June 29, 2011
Leave it to Orioles manager Buck Showalter to come up with the perfect word to describe marginally productive cleanup hitter Vladimir Guerrero. "Unconventional. " It's perfect in this context, because it can be interpreted as both a compliment and a curse, depending on whether you're viewing Guerrero as a potential Hall of Famer at the end of a long and storied career or a stubborn veteran who refuses to recognize that what was once a great strength has become a great weakness.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Environmentalists will team up Saturday to build support for a 5-cent plastic bag fee in Baltimore by handing out reusable bags and taking part in a citywide cleanup effort. Blue Water Baltimore, Waterfront Partnership, Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Trash Free Maryland Alliance, Clean Water Action and volunteers will fan out across Baltimore to pick up litter in a show of support for legislation introduced by Councilman James B. Kraft that would impose a fee on most plastic bags distributed in the city.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 14, 2012
Back River isn't the only Baltimore area water body cluttered with used tires.  The Gunpowder River, arguably one of the region's most popular recreational water ways, has its share, too. Gunpowder Falls State Park draws anglers, kayakers, picnickers, swimmers and scads of tubers - so many, in fact, that friction has arisen over the transformation of the river through northern Baltimore County into what critics call a " superhighway of...
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
Officials from Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia said Wednesday that despite budget woes, the states are on track to hit near-term targets for reducing pollution fouling the Chesapeake Bay. But activists, who rallied in Annapolis on the eve of a bay summit in Baltimore, questioned the states' claims and called for federal pressure on them to take even stronger actions. "The states have not been able to do it themselves, despite promises to do so," said William C. Baker, president of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2012
Orioles catcher Matt Wieters, who was away from the team yesterday for the birth of his first child, Maverick Luther, is back with the team. He's in the starting lineup, batting cleanup and catching. Also back is Lew Ford, who had been dealing with a hip injury since Sunday. He will be the team's DH. Here's the Orioles lineup versus the Red Sox on Saturday: McLouth 7, Hardy 6, Jones 8, Wieters 2, Davis 3, Reynolds 3, Machado 5, Ford dh, Andino 4, Steve Johnson 1.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
After nearly a dozen years, $16 million and the removal of some 50,000 tons of contaminated dirt, the Coast Guard declared the Superfund site at the Coast Guard Yard south of Baltimore cleaned and ready for duty Thursday. The yard landed on the Superfund list — a national registry of sites designated for federally supervised cleanup — after a century of building and repairing ships. Blasting paint off ships, storing oil and batteries, burning waste and dumping bilge left the ground polluted with dioxin, pesticides, metals, PCBs and other contaminants — some of which spilled into nearby Arundel Cove and Curtis Creek.
NEWS
August 2, 2013
Veterans of previous cleanups aided success of summer event I would like to thank these individuals for their efforts during our 15th annual community clean-up July 13, from 7 a.m. until noon. The same faces appear year after year. Sponsors include: Mo's Softee provided refreshments; Helen Spamer, permit; Riverview Elementary School, parking lot; and Lucky Auto Repair, fliers. Among the volunteers were: Betty Cain, Ernie Bailey, Frank Shiloh, Gene Wagner, Harriet Pittman, Karl McGovern and Patton Lam with pickup trucks, Marty Bors, Maryellen Light and Phil Schaefer with a trailer.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 13, 2012
After years of investigation and some limited cleanup, an old Dundalk area dumping ground containing toxic wastes is due for federal attention now. The Environmental Protection Agency announced today (3/13) that it is adding the Sauer Dump to the National Priorities List, also known as Superfund , because the soil and wetland sediment on the 2.5-acre site contain high concentrations of lead, PCBs and other hazardous chemicals. The partly wooded tract on Back River was originally marshland that was filled in by a past owner, according to EPA. Toxic substances were deposited there while it operated as a dump from the 1960s through the 1980s. A number of homes are nearby.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Hopes for redevelopment of the former Sparrows Point steel mill in Baltimore County - and the promise of new jobs - took two giant strides forward Thursday as the land was sold to a new owner who also reached agreement with state and federal environmental agencies on a cleanup plan for the polluted site. The massive former Bethlehem Steel facility was shuttered two years ago and auctioned off in a bankruptcy-law proceeding to salvage companies. The land has now been sold for an undisclosed amount to Sparrows Point Terminal, an offshoot of the Hanover-based investment firm Redwood Capital Investments LLC. Under terms of an agreement announced Thursday with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Maryland Department of the Environment, Redwood Capital will commit $48 million to clean up the property's land and groundwater, and pay $3 million to the EPA to investigate issues in the water surrounding Sparrows Point.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 9, 2014
Legislators from Maryland and Pennsylvania sparred at a hearing in Annapolis Monday over whether their states are doing too much or too little to reduce Chesapeake Bay pollution. In a U.S. Senate subcommittee hearing called to review the new bay restoration agreement, Maryland state Sen. Steve Hershey complained about the "astronomical cost" of cleaning up the ailing estuary, calling it an "unfunded mandate" from the federal government. Maryland's share has been estimated at nearly $15 billion through 2025, he noted.
NEWS
September 9, 2014
I'm left speechless after reading your recent editorial on the Conowingo Dam ( "Damning the dam," Sept. 1). It would seem to me that some Chesapeake Bay cleanup lobbyist wrote this article. Of course we have to continue our efforts to restore the bay. Of course overflowing sewers and stormwater run-off continue to damage the environment, and of course they must be stopped. But your writer is either ignorant of history or too young to remember tropical storm Agnes and how it virtually wiped out the grasses in the bay, causing damage we are still feeling more than 40 years later.
NEWS
September 1, 2014
The general election is still more than two months away but here's a bit of friendly advice to candidates hoping to win office in Maryland: Don't use the Conowingo Dam as an excuse to stop cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay. That would seem like common sense but it's become increasingly clear that damning the dam has become a popular political strategy. Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan released a 30-second ad through his website last month that essentially blames the Conowingo for the bay's woes and urges voters to fight back against other pollution-fighting strategies endorsed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Democratically-controlled state government.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | August 19, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan doubled down on his efforts to seize the issue of the environment from Democratic rival Anthony G. Brown Tuesday, releasing a video in which he criticizes the O'Malley-Brown administration's efforts to protect the Chesapeake Bay. In the video, Hogan tells viewers that he would help the bay by "standing up for Maryland" and demanding that New York and Pennsylvania do more to clean up the Susquehanna River,...
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
A Baltimore City Circuit Court judge has ordered an absentee Baltimore landlord to clean up about 50 blighted properties within 90 days, the first ruling since a state law was amended two years ago to make it easier for community groups to sue the owners of problem properties. Judge Pamela J. White found that 49 properties owned by Scott Wizig and corporate affiliates represented legal nuisances, with "unsafe and uninhabitable" conditions that have not been fixed despite requests by community groups and notices of violations of the building code.
EXPLORE
September 25, 2011
Although this year's community clean-up Sept. 10 was two months later than usual, it was another success because of dozens of volunteers. They contributed time and energy, some anonymously. We express a big thank you to all. We filled seven roll-off large metal outdoor trash containers, besides recycling approximately 100 pounds of aluminum, 80 gallons of paint and 30 used tires. First and foremost, I want to thank Councilman Tom Quirk, (and staff members) Pete Kriscumas and Kathy Engers, who not only returned us to Baltimore County's community clean-up program, but came out and got dirty with the rest of us. I also thank Al Nalley, Betty Cain, Harriet Pittman, Phil Schaefer, Frank Shiloh, Lloyd and Cathi Anderson and Telik Johnson.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2010
The Environmental Protection Agency proposed Tuesday taking over cleanup of a former fireworks and munitions plant near Elkton in Cecil County because of extensive groundwater contamination there. The agency announced it was proposing the Dwyer property, as the 73-acre tract is known, for inclusion on the Superfund National Priorities List, a compendium of the most polluted sites in the nation. The abandoned and overgrown property has been under investigation by the Maryland Department of the Environment since 1989.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
Not a lot of news coming out of Buck Showalter's Sunday morning news conference, though there were some pretty good off-the-record stories about his days playing in the minors. Here's what you need to know, and I can tell you, heading into Sunday's game: * Nelson Cruz, mired in a 1-for-28 slump, was out of the starting lineup Sunday. Showalter is just giving him a breather. After batting .287 with 28 homers and 74 RBIs in 93 first-half games, Cruz is hitting .105 (6-for-57) with one homer and one RBI in 15 second-half games.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 27, 2014
While Maryland and most other Chesapeake Bay states are making decent progress in reducing pollution fouling the estuary, Pennsylvania is "substantially off track" and will receive additional federal help and backup action if necessary, the Environmental Protection Agency reported Thursday. In a review of how all six bay states and the District of Columbia are doing in meeting their federally mandated cleanup targets, the EPA downgraded its rating of Pennsylvania's performance after finding the state fell short of meeting most of its pollution reduction targets for 2013 and appears unlikely to achieve its next "milestone" goals unless efforts are intensified.
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