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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | October 18, 1990
Cleanliness may be next to godliness, but Baltimore officials say it's going to take more than prayers to send that message to city residents -- about $189,000 worth of advertising.The Department of Public Works wants to hire a consultant, Innes and Willett Advertising Inc., to wage a public relations campaign to promote "urban cleanliness."The cost would be $189,000, from a fund reserved for repairing and maintaining streets, according to the proposed contract."The idea is to create less mess, to create less debris and less irresponsible handling of trash by everyone," said James Kapplin, a Public Works Department spokesman.
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NEWS
October 3, 2012
A proposal to require restaurants and bars to post letter grades rating their performance in city health inspections has some business owners worried they may lose customers if inspectors give their establishments a less than perfect score. But giving people access to information that allows them to judge how food and beverage venues stack up against each other in terms of cleanliness has worked in other cities, and there's no reason consumers here shouldn't be able to make the same sort of comparisons.
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FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | August 11, 1998
RECENTLY, I took time off and spent a week at the beach with my family and a week at home cleaning out closets and washing walls and windows.When I returned to work, my women friends asked where I had gone and what I had done, and when I told them, every one expressed her envy.Not of my week at the beach -- of my week cleaning house."Don't you feel wonderful?" asked one of my friends. And I knew instinctively that she was not asking if I had been rejuvenated by the sound of the ocean."I feel like I am starting fresh," I said, smiling placidly.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2008
Salary: $70,000 Age: 38 Years on the job: 18 How he got started : After serving in Desert Storm, Walden took a job as a technician in the central sterilizing department of a hospital in the Philadelphia area. While working full time, he completed his bachelor's degree in criminal justice and health care administration at Temple University. He later moved to Maryland and took a job at Johns Hopkins Hospital in its central sterilizing department. He switched to his job with Sinai Hospital five months ago. He's certified by the International Association of Healthcare Central Service Materiel Management and the Certification Board for Sterile Processing and Distribution.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 11, 1996
TOKYO -- The most fastidious country in the world is becoming even more hygiene-obsessed.Consider the anti-bacterial calculator, on whose keypad microbes will not multiply. A tsunami-sized wave of consumer interest has created a multibillion-dollar market for such products, which include everything from sheets and towels to watchbands, staplers and ATM cards.The hyper-clean calculators -- impregnated with a germ-killing agent -- come from Casio, which intended to market them to restaurants and hospitals.
NEWS
August 26, 2001
Baltimore ranked 23rd among 25 major cities in the 2001 Kid-Friendly Cities Report Card by the environmental group Zero Population Growth. It rates cities on many aspects of "kid-friendliness," including health conditions, safety, education and environmental cleanliness. To find out more, go to www.kidfriendlycities.org/2001. A+ Portland, Ore. Seattle A Minneapolis New York A- San Francisco Boston Denver B+ Ft. Worth, Texas Houston San Diego B San Jose, Calif., Dallas Pittsburgh St. Louis Cleveland Chicago Philadelphia C+ Phoenix C Los Angeles Miami Tampa, Fla. Washington C- Baltimore Detroit Atlanta SUN STAFF
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | January 19, 2006
AMC Owings Mills 17 The Senator Theatre 5904 York Road / 410-435-8338 / senator.com The single-screen theater plays 1940s jazz tunes before showings, which fits, given its classic appearance. Tickets --$8 for everyone, and the theater accepts cash only. Children younger than 5 are not allowed. Popcorn --$3.50, small; $4.50, medium; $5.50, large Sodas --$2.50, small; $3.50, medium, $4.50, large Parking --The Senator shares the parking lot behind Staples on York Road, right up the street.
NEWS
By Maude McDaniel and Maude McDaniel,Special to The Sun | May 7, 1995
"Chasing Dirt: The American Pursuit of Cleanliness," by Suellen Hoy. Illustrated. 258 pages. New York: Oxford University Press. $25 The "eerie Lifebuoy 'B.O.' foghorn" haunted my youth. It's good to report that meeting it again in the pages of this exhaustively researched social history of America's evolution from incredible filth to obsessive cleanliness somehow laid the old ghost to rest.The 1940s radio commercial was, in fact, a late development in a long crusade against dirt that began in the mid-19th century, inspired by conditions that would appall even those of us who suspect we were born several generations too late.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | March 8, 1993
There's just no pleasing some people. Your heart can be in the right place but they still complain.An example is President Clinton's decision to airdrop food and medical supplies for trapped Bosnian Muslims who are being ethnically cleansed by the Serbs.Can anyone deny that it's a nice thing to do? Of course not. Even those who don't number any Bosnian Muslims among their best friends think we should do it.But what do the critics say? That it is almost a complete waste of time, an empty gesture.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | November 17, 1991
A fledgling army of community activists dedicated itself yesterday to mounting a war against the urban habits that have made many of Baltimore's streams inhospitable for fish or even a leisurely walk along their banks.Organizers for the non-profit group Save Our Streams shared tactics with about 50 neighborhood leaders who gathered for a planning session at the Liberty Medical Center. But, the organizers said, it will ultimately be up to the leaders to clean up the mud, tires and assorted debris that clog city streams.
NEWS
By ALIA MALIK | August 13, 2006
The flag flying over Atlantic Marina Resort is the state's version of the Good Housekeeping seal of approval. The Pasadena marina, which invested $6,000 last year in measures to encourage boaters and employees to be more environmentally aware, proudly displays the "Maryland Clean Marina" flag for all to see. It's the main perk of earning that designation from the Department of Natural Resources, which, along with the Marine Trades Association of Maryland,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | January 19, 2006
AMC Owings Mills 17 The Senator Theatre 5904 York Road / 410-435-8338 / senator.com The single-screen theater plays 1940s jazz tunes before showings, which fits, given its classic appearance. Tickets --$8 for everyone, and the theater accepts cash only. Children younger than 5 are not allowed. Popcorn --$3.50, small; $4.50, medium; $5.50, large Sodas --$2.50, small; $3.50, medium, $4.50, large Parking --The Senator shares the parking lot behind Staples on York Road, right up the street.
NEWS
November 6, 2005
Where do I go to find out [a restaurant's] sanitation rating? I'm from a state where ratings are posted at the door, leaving nothing to chance. - Timisha Porcher I love California's system, where restaurants get a letter grade from the health department, which they have to post prominently in front. Baltimore's system is more pass-fail. The city health department doesn't give ratings, but it does, of course, inspect places. The information on a particular restaurant is available to the public; you have to go to the department in person to get it. Have a question about dining out in the Baltimore area?
NEWS
By NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 2003
Both war and peace had a role in making Americans some of the most clean-conscious people on the face of the planet. The lethality of germs was brought home during the Civil War, when three times as many soldiers died from infectious diseases as from combat. After World War II, as women returned from the factories to resume household roles, the demand for more modern home appliances increased, and vacuum cleaners and washing machines made cleanliness an end in itself. Today antibacterials - germ-fighting compounds - are in products as wide-ranging as sponges, children's toys, mattresses and pantyhose.
NEWS
August 26, 2001
Baltimore ranked 23rd among 25 major cities in the 2001 Kid-Friendly Cities Report Card by the environmental group Zero Population Growth. It rates cities on many aspects of "kid-friendliness," including health conditions, safety, education and environmental cleanliness. To find out more, go to www.kidfriendlycities.org/2001. A+ Portland, Ore. Seattle A Minneapolis New York A- San Francisco Boston Denver B+ Ft. Worth, Texas Houston San Diego B San Jose, Calif., Dallas Pittsburgh St. Louis Cleveland Chicago Philadelphia C+ Phoenix C Los Angeles Miami Tampa, Fla. Washington C- Baltimore Detroit Atlanta SUN STAFF
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
Activists in Savage didn't appreciate the force they were tapping when - with late spring-cleaning in mind - they asked county officials to lend the community a few Dumpster-sized trash containers. The two containers delivered the afternoon of June 15 were filled by nightfall with unwanted items from basements, attics and back yards. Two more containers provided Saturday morning were overflowing by lunchtime. Then people started piling castoffs on the sidewalk. An overwhelming urge to purge hits neighborhoods across Howard County this time of year - one of the busiest for the county's Community Clean-Up Program, which lets residents book free trash containers to rid themselves of bulky junk.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
Activists in Savage didn't appreciate the force they were tapping when - with late spring-cleaning in mind - they asked county officials to lend the community a few Dumpster-sized trash containers. The two containers delivered the afternoon of June 15 were filled by nightfall with unwanted items from basements, attics and back yards. Two more containers provided Saturday morning were overflowing by lunchtime. Then people started piling castoffs on the sidewalk. An overwhelming urge to purge hits neighborhoods across Howard County this time of year - one of the busiest for the county's Community Clean-Up Program, which lets residents book free trash containers to rid themselves of bulky junk.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1999
Forty-five inmates on work-release from the Carroll County Detention Center were late for their jobs yesterday, after failing to pass an early-morning inspection of their bunk area, jail officials said.They were detained as part of a crackdown by Sheriff Kenneth L. Tregoning, who said the inmates had been warned several times in the past week that they would be held accountable "consistently and uniformly" for making beds and keeping their personal items and living space in order."There was some grumbling, but they quickly realized they were not going out to work until everyone complied," Tregoning said.
BUSINESS
By Rachel Brown and Rachel Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 5, 2000
Almost every old house has a story, and Pete Schoenbrodt has filled his house with the story of his family. Black and white photos of three generations of German immigrants grace the walls of most rooms and line the upstairs hallway. The familys formal mahogany furniture fills the dining room, where a breakfront contains three china collections handed down from grandparents and parents. Even the living rooms slate fireplace mantel, painted to look like marble, has a family connection having come from the house where Schoenbrodts father was born.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1999
Forty-five inmates on work-release from the Carroll County Detention Center were late for their jobs yesterday, after failing to pass an early-morning inspection of their bunk area, jail officials said.They were detained as part of a crackdown by Sheriff Kenneth L. Tregoning, who said the inmates had been warned several times in the past week that they would be held accountable "consistently and uniformly" for making beds and keeping their personal items and living space in order."There was some grumbling, but they quickly realized they were not going out to work until everyone complied," Tregoning said.
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