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By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | May 21, 2009
More than 60 environmental groups from the six states whose rivers drain into the Chesapeake Bay have formed a coalition to press for stronger federal government efforts to clean up their local waterways, it was announced yesterday. "Clean, healthy water is vital to the health of every one of the nearly 17 million people that live in this region," Jan Jarrett, executive director of Citizens for Pennsylvania's Future, said in a statement announcing the formation of the Choose Clean Water Campaign.
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | December 30, 2008
Pollution and overharvesting in the Chesapeake Bay have devastated the blue crab population by killing crab feed and eroding key habitats, a leading environmental group said in report released yesterday. And, the group said, the federal government has failed to enforce environmental laws that would help remedy the problem.To prevent the dead zones that kill clams and worms that crabs eat and the algae blooms that kill crab habitats, the Environmental Protection Agency must impose a regulatory cap on the amount of pollution entering the bay and enforce the Clean Water Act, according to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's report.
NEWS
By David Bancroft | October 3, 2008
This two-part commentary from Bay Journal News Service presents the views of the Republican and Democratic candidates for president on their policies regarding the Chesapeake Bay region. For those of us in the Mid-Atlantic region who value clean rivers and streams and want to preserve our quality of life, the decision to vote for Sen. Barack Obama is an easy one. Mr. Obama's platform recognizes the unique nature of the Chesapeake watershed, and he is dedicated to providing the resources to clean up the water flowing into the bay. The Obama Democratic platform states, "We support a comprehensive solution for restoring our national treasures - such as the Great Lakes, Everglades and Chesapeake Bay - including expanded scientific research and protections for species and habitats there."
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | May 12, 2008
More than 80 percent of Baltimore-area residents say they're willing to do "a lot more" to prevent water pollution, but they don't want to pay more taxes to solve the problem, according to a newly released opinion survey. This suggests an ad campaign to educate people about steps they can take in their personal lives - picking up pet waste, using less lawn fertilizer and stopping littering - could help clean up Baltimore Harbor and the Chesapeake Bay, according to a pair of local environmental groups that commissioned the research.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | September 15, 2007
Under threat of a lawsuit from state regulators, Constellation Energy Corp. said yesterday that it will stop dumping fly ash from coal at a mine in Anne Arundel County while it negotiates and carries out a plan to clean up neighbors' contaminated drinking water. By Monday, Constellation will no longer drop off truckloads of fly ash, a byproduct of its coal-fired plants, at an 80-acre site in Gambrills owned by BBSS Inc., said Rob Gould, a Constellation spokesman, but he declined to say where it would deposit the debris instead.
NEWS
By Richard Simon and Richard Simon,Los Angeles Times | March 10, 2007
Washington -- Setting up a confrontation with President Bush over spending, the Democratic-controlled House approved a bill yesterday that would increase funding for clean-water projects, such as those aimed at preventing beach pollution. The bill, which would authorize $14 billion over four years, was approved on a 303-108 vote, despite a White House veto threat. It now goes to the Senate. The debate offered a preview of coming budget fights between the White House and the Democratic majority in Congress.
NEWS
By DAVID G. SAVAGE and DAVID G. SAVAGE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 16, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court sided with the environment over electric power yesterday, ruling that state regulators may require a steady flow of water over power dams to benefit both fish and kayakers. The unanimous decision holds that states may protect the health of their rivers, even though hydroelectric power dams are regulated exclusively by the federal government. The dispute arose over five small dams on the Presumpscot River in Maine, but the court's decision affects an estimated 1,500 power dams in 45 states.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | December 11, 2005
The path to a cleaner Chesapeake Bay may run through the heart of Baltimore in the form of a 10-foot-wide trench. Neighborhood leaders from Hampden to East Baltimore are grappling with the potential effects of a $40 million sewer project - one of the most complicated the city has undertaken - that will require a four-mile trench so workers can install a new main starting in spring. While city officials say the project will reduce the dumping of raw sewage into area waterways, including the bay, homeowners along the route are worried about the potential for weeks, or even months, of disruptions.
NEWS
October 12, 2005
NATIONAL Court to review Clean Water Act After its first private conference led by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., the Supreme Court said it would hear three cases that ask the justices to cut back on the reach of the Clean Water Act of 1972, the anti-pollution measure that led to the cleanup of streams, rivers and bays across the United States. pg 3a WORLD Weather slows rescue efforts Rain and hail slowed rescue efforts in some the areas hardest hit by Saturday's earthquake in south Asia.
NEWS
By DAVID G. SAVAGE and DAVID G. SAVAGE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 12, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, in a potentially far-reaching clash between the environment and the rights of property owners, agreed yesterday to consider limiting the federal government's power to protect hundreds of millions of acres of wetlands. After its first private conference led by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., the court said it would hear three cases that ask the justices to cut back on the reach of the Clean Water Act of 1972, the anti-pollution measure that led to the cleanup of streams, rivers and bays around the United States.
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