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NEWS
April 23, 2012
As The Sun's recent editorial rightly points out ("Three wins for the bay," April 16), environmental groups were real winners during the recent, contentious session of the Maryland General Assembly. The Baltimore Harbor, the Patapsco and Back Rivers, and local streams will be cleaner thanks to legislation to reduce pollution from sewage treatment plants, storm water runoff and septic systems. Just as Baltimore plays an enormous role in the Chesapeake Bay's health, our city was key to this success and our residents will reap the rewards.
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NEWS
by Annie Linskey | March 28, 2012
Environmentalists came to Annapolis dressed in waders, life jackets and even a shark costume to rally for a package of bills moving through the House and Senate that would protect water quality. "There is nothing more important than clean water," said Del. Tom Hucker, a Montgomery County Democrat who pushed legislation in the House for a storm water fee. "We are on the finish line. " This year environmentalists had four legislative goals: Mandate that counties create storm water fees to fund retrofitting impermeable surfaces like paved parking lots, curb sprawl and reduce nitrogen in the Chesapeake Bay by limiting septic systems, increase to the flush tax to fund waste water plant upgrades, and tighten the rules for the types of septic systems allowed.
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EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | March 8, 2012
The Harford County public and municipal elected officials in Aberdeen, Bel Air and Havre de Grace need to pay particularly close attention three bills on water and sewer issues that are scheduled for hearings before the Harford County Council this Tuesday, March 13, beginning at 6:30 p.m. Though the bills to some degree reflect a move in the general direction of a unified water system for the county, the question whether the county needs such...
NEWS
February 21, 2012
There has been a lot of discussion and controversy in the Maryland General Assembly and in the counties about growth-related strategies. Some say they take away private rights; others, that these strategies save money and protect our water. Since we all want to have clean water and save on government expenditures, why not support smart growth initiatives? There is an effort to do this through bills in the legislature, House Bill 445 and Senate Bill 236. Both these measures call for managing growth by limiting sprawl development.
NEWS
By Fred Tutman | November 28, 2011
As an African-American and an environmentalist, I went along for a long while with the idea that race and class are irrelevant to the cause of environmental protection. I assumed that the environment itself is connective and bridges the social divide. But I can no longer ignore that a color-blind, class-blind environmental movement is also too often blind to the needs of those with the least access to clean air, water and land. By ignoring the obvious social divisions in society, a relatively non-inclusive green movement has emerged.
NEWS
November 26, 2011
I was shocked and very disappointed to see Gov. Martin O'Malley's letter regarding the Environmental Law Clinic at the University of Maryland ("O'Malley butts in," Nov. 21). Mr. O'Malley has been a champion of clean energy and global warming solutions, and he has promoted some sound policies to clean up the Chesapeake Bay, like reducing pollution from septic systems. But when it comes to this lawsuit, I believe the governor is clearly in the wrong. This case is about defending our clean water laws and protecting the Chesapeake Bay. Even more fundamentally, it's about whether poultry companies should be held responsible for water pollution caused by their chickens' manure.
NEWS
November 3, 2011
I was pleased to read the Sun's recent editorial regarding the proposals to finance transportation construction projects and upgrade sewage treatment ("Tale of two tax plans," Oct. 30). While it may come as a shock to hear in our current anti-tax, anti-government climate, this is one citizen who wholeheartedly supports an increase in Maryland's Bay Restoration Fund - which is an investment in our economy, in protecting public health, and in cleaning up our rivers and streams, and the Chesapeake Bay. Since it was signed into law in 2004 by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., the Bay Restoration Fund (BRF)
EXPLORE
November 1, 2011
Editor: Patrick McGrady is my neighbor. I have known him for almost 26 years. I'm supporting him for mayor of Aberdeen because I trust him and his family. They are honest, God-fearing, and hard-working. Patrick will work tirelessly to get Aberdeen back to basics: clean water, safe streets and low taxes. Aberdeen will have a bright future if we elect Patrick McGrady. Gisele Knapp Aberdeen
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October 27, 2011
Editor: I am running for Mayor of Aberdeen because I love Aberdeen and I want to see our community thrive. To get there, we are going to need to work together to reduce the heavy burden of property taxes and water bills that keep piling up on our citizens. Aberdeen's citizens deserve taxes and water bills that are predictable, low, and fair. We all understand that some government is necessary, but too much government is costly and inefficient. Aberdeen needs to get back to the basics of providing adequate police protection, delivering clean water to our homes (at the lowest possible rate)
NEWS
July 18, 2011
Water has a tendency to flow downhill. This has been known for quite some time - to the point one might have assumed word had penetrated the hallowed halls of the U.S. House of Representatives by now. Alas, it appears not. Last Wednesday, the House voted, 239-184, to rewrite the Clean Water Act to limit federal authority and give the states the final word on interpreting and enforcing water pollution laws. Even more stupefying, one of those voting for this misguided effort represents a district with perhaps the most to gain from stringent enforcement of the Clean Water Act - Rep. Andy Harris of Maryland's 1 s t Congressional District.
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