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Clean Water Act

NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2003
Environmental activists gathered on Federal Hill yesterday to celebrate Earth Day by accusing the Bush administration of weakening some of the most important environmental legislation enacted in the past 30 years. "The Bush administration should be listening to the public and not to the polluters," said Gigi Kellett, a spokeswoman for Maryland Public Interest Research Group, at a Baltimore news conference coordinated with similar gatherings around the country. Kellett and other environmental leaders said federal agencies under President Bush have quietly crafted regulations that effectively roll back key provisions of the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act and federal Superfund legislation, which was enacted to clean up toxic waste sites.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2000
The state and county are collecting samples from Piney Run Reservoir, a potential water source for South Carroll, to determine levels of phosphorus and sediment and possibly pinpoint their source. While certain amounts of such nutrients are acceptable, excessive levels can spawn thick algae blooms that affect water quality and create problems in water treatment. "Elevated levels of certain elements are not acceptable," said county hydrogeologist Tom Devilbiss in a meeting with the county commissioners yesterday.
NEWS
March 17, 2011
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's effort to put Chesapeake Bay states on a "pollution diet" represents the most hopeful effort toward cleaning up the estuary in a generation. So why are House Republicans so invested in sabotaging it? That the GOP would like to thwart the EPA on any number of fronts is clear enough. The House attempted to block funding of the EPA's Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) restrictions on nutrients and sediment earlier this year, and only opposition from the Senate has prevented a general evisceration of the agency's budget.
NEWS
April 15, 2011
In an article about natural gas drilling ("Md. environment chief wants more U.S. oversight of fracking," April 13), The Sun's John Fritze reports that to "extract natural gas through fracking, companies use millions of gallons of liquids," but that explanation is inadequate. Anyone interested in information about fracking for gas extraction should watch the HBO documentary, "Gasland," or drive up to Bradford County, Penn. and see the devastating results of this process. Toxic chemicals are pumped into the ground with water and sand to force the gas up. Sixty-five of the chemicals used are considered dangerous to human health.
NEWS
July 16, 2010
I have an article request for your writing team: the threat of water contamination, including to the Chesapeake Bay, resulting from the process of hydraulic fracturing used by natural gas companies, and their arrival to Maryland. Hydraulic fracturing is a process where natural gas companies drill 5,000-plus feet beneath the surface of the earth into shale deposits, or rocks that contain natural gas. In order to extract the gas, they use a mixture of sand, hundreds of thousands of gallons of fresh water, and toxic chemicals to break the gas away from the shale and bring it to the surface.
NEWS
September 30, 2013
As highlighted in "A Victory for the Chesapeake" (Sept. 19), Pennsylvania Judge Sylvia Rambo recently issued a thoughtful ruling in defense of the Environmental Protection Agency's authority to enforce the Clean Water Act. After a challenge by the Farm Bureau and others, the federal court affirmed that the EPA has the authority to issue pollution limits based on sound science and can continue doing its job of protecting the environment. This is good news for those of us who enjoy clean water for recreational purposes, but even more importantly, this is great news for those of us who depend on our water resources for food and commodities.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2011
F. Gould Charshee Jr., an environmental planner who worked for decades on improving water quality in the Baltimore metropolitan area, died June 11 of complications from Parkinson's disease and a series of strokes at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Roland Park resident was 66. Mr. Charshee was born and raised in Summit, N.J. He attended the Johns Hopkins University in the mid-1960s. He met his future wife, Pamela Ford, then a student at Roland Park Country School, after a mutual friend introduced them and they went out on a blind date.
NEWS
December 13, 2012
The Chesapeake Bay Foundation appreciates the concern about nutrient trading expressed by Dr. Robert S. Lawrence of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health ("Nutrient trading a dirty deal for the bay, Dec. 9). We would like to present some additional information to the conversation about this complicated and controversial topic. We agree with Dr. Lawrence that any trading program that allows local waters to remain dirty is unacceptable. Reducing pollution so that local waterways and the bay meet water quality standards is the ultimate goal of the Clean Water Blueprint for the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and streams.
NEWS
March 29, 2010
Make no mistake, the state Senate has done much more than express some idle curiosity about the University of Maryland's law clinics. Budget language approved by the Senate last week includes a not-so-subtle message: Be careful whom you let your law students represent. The tactics have all the charm of what Sen. Jim Brochin calls "something straight out of communist China." The University of Maryland School of Law is being ordered to produce a list of all the plaintiffs its students have represented over the past two years or lose $250,000 in funding.
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