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NEWS
March 11, 2013
I am writing in response to Sen. E.J. Pipkin's letter to the editor in which he called me the state's land planning czar ("O'Malley is waging war on rural Maryland," Feb. 26). The senator may think such name-calling and his "war on rural Maryland" slogan is strategic for him. However, it is bad for rural, suburban, and urban Maryland. This type of rhetoric damages the "One Maryland" approach that has helped bind all of the state's communities together for many years. As a matter of fact, the state provides more assistance per capita in rural counties than it does in the more suburban and urban counties in Central Maryland.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Four of Anne Arundel County's sewage plants have wom awards for meeting pollution discharge permits for several years running. The Broadneck Water Reclamation Facility on the Broadneck Peninsula and the Broadwater Water Reclamation Facility in Churchton earned Platinum Peak Performance Awards from the National Association of Clean Water Agencies. Platinum awards are given to plants with five consecutive years of no permit violations. Broadwater was honored for 17 straight years of compliance with its pollution permits, and Broadneck was honored for having six straight years of compliance with pollution permits.
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NEWS
July 14, 2013
The bills are in the mail, and Marylanders in the urban and near-urban counties are beginning a costly and long-term investment in clean water. Or not ("Balto. Co. companies question new fee," July 11). A short year ago, the stormwater fee requirement was enacted by the General Assembly and signed into law with an effective date of July 1, 2013. The state regulators anticipated that the timeline would give the local jurisdictions the opportunity to develop fee schedules to meet their individualized needs.
NEWS
By Stephen Schaff | August 4, 2014
The new Waters of the U.S. rule is designed to clarify that the Clean Water Act protects a variety of important waters, including seasonal and rain-dependent streams, as well as wetlands near rivers and streams. Getting it implemented will depend on support from our members of Congress for the agencies' proposal. It'll affect a lot more than your favorite crab cakes - it could save your job. Think clean water only counts when it comes out of your tap or when you dive in at the beach?
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | March 28, 2012
Environmentalists came to Annapolis dressed in waders, life jackets and even a shark costume to rally for a package of bills moving through the House and Senate that would protect water quality. "There is nothing more important than clean water," said Del. Tom Hucker, a Montgomery County Democrat who pushed legislation in the House for a storm water fee. "We are on the finish line. " This year environmentalists had four legislative goals: Mandate that counties create storm water fees to fund retrofitting impermeable surfaces like paved parking lots, curb sprawl and reduce nitrogen in the Chesapeake Bay by limiting septic systems, increase to the flush tax to fund waste water plant upgrades, and tighten the rules for the types of septic systems allowed.
NEWS
April 23, 2012
As The Sun's recent editorial rightly points out ("Three wins for the bay," April 16), environmental groups were real winners during the recent, contentious session of the Maryland General Assembly. The Baltimore Harbor, the Patapsco and Back Rivers, and local streams will be cleaner thanks to legislation to reduce pollution from sewage treatment plants, storm water runoff and septic systems. Just as Baltimore plays an enormous role in the Chesapeake Bay's health, our city was key to this success and our residents will reap the rewards.
NEWS
August 30, 2002
THE U.S. government is about to announce it is earmarking $970 million to improve access to potable water in developing countries. Meanwhile, this country is the lone holdout in Johannesburg negotiations that would set global targets for providing uncontaminated water to the 1.1 billion people currently without it. The reason for Washington's resistance is its worry about being obligated to cover the high costs. Smart economics, maybe. But politically, that position isolates this country in a way that could have extraordinary political consequences.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | February 2, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Seeking to save money and improve the nation's water quality, the Clinton administration unveiled a package of clean water proposals yesterday that backers say could significantly help the Chesapeake Bay.The new proposal by the Environmental Protection Agency calls for adding $4 billion to a fund to improve sewage treatment plants; targeting runoff from farms and developments; and reducing air pollution from cars and power plants that affect...
NEWS
By Dan Pontious | September 28, 1994
WHEN MEMBERS of Congress head home for the November elections, there may be more than health care reform left unfinished. Lack of attention to water pollution may leave public health begging as well.This is the year when Congress is supposed to revise both the Clean Water Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act. There is ample reason to toughen both laws. The federal Environmental Protection Agency says that more than a third of our nation's waterways are unsafe for fishing, swimming or other uses.
NEWS
By James R. May | October 20, 1997
WE USED TO treat our nation's waterways with what can be best described as disdain. We viewed rivers, streams, lakes, ponds, estuaries and oceans alike as the nation's waste receptacles.Only 25 years ago, one of the world's great freshwater lakes, Lake Erie, was pronounced dead. Ohio's Cuyahoga River near Cleveland spontaneously burst into flames.Chesapeake cesspoolGrand waters in the nation's history, like Boston Harbor, the Chesapeake Bay and the Hudson, Delaware and Potomac rivers, were cesspools.
NEWS
June 22, 2014
This spring, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency took some long-overdue steps to fix the Clean Water Act, ending confusion over which streams and wetlands are protected by the law. Loopholes in the law created over the past decade have left more the half the stream miles in the U.S. and drinking water sources for 100 percent of Baltimore City residents at risk from pollution and development. Polluters and their allies in Congress are fighting tooth and nail to block the EPA from taking this common sense step to protect clean water.
NEWS
December 10, 2013
I was astonished by Diane Leopold's recent commentary citing a Dominion executive who downplayed the need for an environmental impact statement regarding a proposed liquid natural gas plant near Cove Point residential neighborhoods ( "Dominion Transmission: Cove Point LNG project environmentally sound," Dec. 4). Ms. Leopold blithely proclaims that Dominion will "clean the air of other smog-producing emissions by paying companies for their reduced emissions of pollution, as permitted by federal and state law. " Her logic is as twisted as it is offensive to residents of Cove Point, who are going to end up on the smoggy end of this deal.
NEWS
November 4, 2013
With the 2014 general election almost exactly one year away, at least five of Maryland's gubernatorial candidates are scheduled to debate environmental issues for the first time tomorrow in Annapolis. No doubt questions will range from smart growth to climate change to the future of the Chesapeake Bay, but surely no topic is likely to prove more contentious than what Maryland should do about polluted run-off from city and suburban streets. Voters would be wise to pay attention to what the candidates have to say on the subject as it may prove the best way to sort those who claim to care about clean water from those who are willing to do something about it. The political grandstanding over the state's "rain tax" has been one of the more disheartening developments to hit the local environmental movement in recent years.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | October 8, 2013
The idea of having Harford County served by a single governmental entity responsible for providing clean water and treating sewage on the whole is a good one. There are, however, aspects of such a system that deserve close public scrutiny as the water and sewer authority is being established. As the water and sewer authority would be managed by an appointed board that will have the authority to set rates, the general public needs to be assured a level of dominion over the service.
NEWS
September 30, 2013
As highlighted in "A Victory for the Chesapeake" (Sept. 19), Pennsylvania Judge Sylvia Rambo recently issued a thoughtful ruling in defense of the Environmental Protection Agency's authority to enforce the Clean Water Act. After a challenge by the Farm Bureau and others, the federal court affirmed that the EPA has the authority to issue pollution limits based on sound science and can continue doing its job of protecting the environment. This is good news for those of us who enjoy clean water for recreational purposes, but even more importantly, this is great news for those of us who depend on our water resources for food and commodities.
NEWS
By Chris Trumbauer | September 20, 2013
I listened with curiosity to Harford County Executive (and Republican gubernatorial candidate) David Craig's broadside against clean water this week. I realize that as we close in on Maryland's 2014 election, campaign fodder often overtakes serious debate, but even so I was surprised at his rant against county stormwater legislation that he himself introduced and then signed into law. Polluted runoff is a serious problem. In Anne Arundel County, it is responsible for a blanket advisory from our health department warning our residents against water contact within 48 hours after a rainfall.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of the Sun | May 31, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In one of his most focused attacks on the new Republican agenda, President Clinton denounced yesterday a House bill altering the Clean Water Act as the "Dirty Water Act" -- and spelled out his threat to veto it."This House bill would put the cleanliness and safety of our water at risk," Mr. Clinton told a group gathered on the picturesque banks of Rock Creek, a place where Theodore Roosevelt loved to hike."Industries in our country use roughly 70,000 pollutants, chemicals and other material that can poison water if they're not controlled properly.
NEWS
By Chris Trumbauer | September 20, 2013
I listened with curiosity to Harford County Executive (and Republican gubernatorial candidate) David Craig's broadside against clean water this week. I realize that as we close in on Maryland's 2014 election, campaign fodder often overtakes serious debate, but even so I was surprised at his rant against county stormwater legislation that he himself introduced and then signed into law. Polluted runoff is a serious problem. In Anne Arundel County, it is responsible for a blanket advisory from our health department warning our residents against water contact within 48 hours after a rainfall.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
The South River Federation set its inaugural Swimmable Action Day to start at 11 a.m. Sunday with a dash into the water off Mayo Beach Park. But the beach's soft-flowing waves beckoned enthusiasts all morning, and young and old answered the call by canoeing, kayaking and swimming - so much so that they had to emerge from the water to stage the group dash on cue. Riverkeeper Diana Muller hopes it stays that way. She and others at the Edgewater-based federation...
NEWS
July 14, 2013
The bills are in the mail, and Marylanders in the urban and near-urban counties are beginning a costly and long-term investment in clean water. Or not ("Balto. Co. companies question new fee," July 11). A short year ago, the stormwater fee requirement was enacted by the General Assembly and signed into law with an effective date of July 1, 2013. The state regulators anticipated that the timeline would give the local jurisdictions the opportunity to develop fee schedules to meet their individualized needs.
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