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Clean Slate

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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Reading along, I come across a reference to a building being slated for completion, and I stop for a moment after all these years in the paragraph game to wonder: slated ? I knew, of course that slate  (v.) means schedule  (v.), and a quick resort to the OED  confirmed that I knew the origin of the term as well: " To put down (a name, etc.) on a writing-slate; to set down, book, for something. ... Also, to plan, propose, or schedule (an event). Chiefly U.S. " Also, "to propose or nominate a candidate for political office; to form a slate of candidates.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2014
Lawyers for John R. Leopold, the disgraced former Anne Arundel county executive, acknowledge his behavior was inappropriate. But they insist that's not a crime. His attorneys are scheduled to appear at the Court of Special Appeals on Wednesday to argue that the conviction of the veteran Republican politician last January for criminal misconduct in office was based on a flawed reading of an unclear law and should be overturned. "Leopold is unaware of any Maryland law which has imposed criminal liability for boorish, loutish behavior akin to the conduct in the … case," lead attorney Bruce Marcus wrote in a court filing.
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1997
"Hopes and dreams" were the watchwords last night as more than 300 people gathered at the first forum in Baltimore to draw a new comprehensive master plan, billed by officials as offering a "clean slate" for the city.Charles C. Graves III, the city planning director, said the session at the Poly-Western auditorium was intended to develop a blueprint for Baltimore for the next century with resident participation.In his welcome to participants at the opening of PlanBaltimore!, Graves said, "We're not doing this for us. We're doing this for the next generation."
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Reading along, I come across a reference to a building being slated for completion, and I stop for a moment after all these years in the paragraph game to wonder: slated ? I knew, of course that slate  (v.) means schedule  (v.), and a quick resort to the OED  confirmed that I knew the origin of the term as well: " To put down (a name, etc.) on a writing-slate; to set down, book, for something. ... Also, to plan, propose, or schedule (an event). Chiefly U.S. " Also, "to propose or nominate a candidate for political office; to form a slate of candidates.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jamie Portman and Jamie Portman,Southam News | May 6, 1994
Toronto -- Your first impression on entering the eighth-floor hotel suite is that George Bush is talking to someone on the telephone. But, of course, this slight, spiky-haired figure in the Levi jacket isn't George Bush. It's Dana Carvey doing one of his uncanny impersonations of the former U.S. president for the benefit of a reporter at the other end of the line.Moments later, he's offering his interviewer a drawling Jimmy Stewart. He finally hangs up, and assumes his own persona of Dana Carvey, a guy who cherishes the opportunity just to be himself -- a 38-year-old father of two with all the anxieties of today's middle class -- but who constantly finds himself under pressure to perform, even when he's not in front of the camera.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 6, 1994
Is there any older, creakier, deader movie bit than . . . amnesia? Really, not even Carbon-14 dating methods could unearth the first time this ancient stroke was employed by a desperate storyteller. Surely it was sometime in the Jurassic.Now here's "Clean Slate," which builds a whole movie around amnesia. Talk about despair! It's a festival of strained, grasping, sweaty almost-gags and near-jokes.Dana Carvey, as wan a screen presence as he is dynamic a tube presence, plays a Los Angeles private detective named Maurice Pogue who has received a brain injury in the middle of a case.
NEWS
By JENNIFER GROW | February 16, 2000
FOR A SHORT WHILE, my fondness of city life was rejuvenated by the last big snowfall. I took a long walk in the midst of the storm and felt a euphoric love of mankind as I saw children and adults throwing snowballs and rushing to Patterson Park to slide down the hill. People were smiling and there was a sense of goodwill. Nearly everyone was playing hooky. I walked down the hill to Fells Point and bumped into some friends at The Daily Grind, sat with my neighbors. We drank coffee and split a torte, laughed a lot. I met more neighbors on my walk home.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1999
The vice chairman of a new advisory committee on the Columbia Horse Center said last night he hopes the financially beleaguered facility can forget its history and start over with a "clean slate.""I think it's important to move forward with a positive outlook," said Dan Bednarik, who was elected vice chairman of the Columbia Association Horse Center Advisory Committee at the group's inaugural meeting last night. "It would be nice to try to establish a clean slate here and at least give it the best shot we can."
BUSINESS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
In less than two weeks, the struggling Avenue Market in West Baltimore will be under new management, but skeptical merchants aren't sure that will make a difference. Baltimore Public Markets Corp., which already manages several of the city's markets, will take over effective Feb. 1, said John Paterakis, chairman of the corporation's board. The market is now managed by the Avenue Market Corp., which receives city funding and was established under then-Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke. "I imagine the city will pick up whatever money that's owed, and then we will go in there with a clean slate and try to run it," Paterakis said.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2004
While Terrell Owens is trying his best to avoid playing for the Ravens, the team's elder statesman said the four-time Pro Bowl receiver would be accepted inside the locker room. "I understand the concerns. But as a player on this team - and I'll speak on our behalf - we want a guy like that," said kicker Matt Stover, 36, the team's players union representative who re-signed with the Ravens for five years yesterday. "The players on this team will welcome him and will want him to get the ball because he is a game-changing athlete.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2012
For Orioles left-hander Brian Matusz, his first 2012 start on Monday brings a new beginning. Matusz, who earned the No. 4 rotation spot this spring, will make his season debut against the defending AL East champion Yankees. The 25-year-old Matusz wants to put last year's disastrous season, when he was 1-9 with a 10.69 ERA and had two trips on the DL, behind him. “It's a fresh season,” Matusz said Sunday. “I don't even remember last year. I've totally cleared it out of my mind and my focus is starting with a clean slate here and to get off on a good start.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2012
For Orioles left-hander Brian Matusz , his first start of the season Monday night brings a new beginning - and a clean slate. Matusz, who earned the No. 4 spot in the rotation this spring, will make his season debut against the defending AL East champion New York Yankees. And the 25-year-old wants to use his first start as an official turning-of-the-page in putting last year's disastrous season behind him. "It's a fresh season," said Matusz, who went 1-9 with a 10.69 ERA last year and had two trips to the DL. "I don't even remember last year.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2011
Oh Teddy. This season has been a bit of a rough ride. Particularly with your prediction for last week's Steeler's match. Ouch. But this is another week. We start with a clean slate and high hopes. Don't forget -- there is ice cream for needy dogs riding on these picks. If Teddy the Pigskin Picking Pup ends the season with a winning record (or probably, at least close to one) the folks over at Frosty Paws promised to throw an ice cream party for the needy pups at Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 5, 2011
Labor Day is a special kind of portal in the calendar year. Pools close and schools open. More than the first day of spring or even Memorial Day, Labor Day is the slamming of the door on one season and the beginning of another. A new school year is a fresh start in a way that New Year's Day cannot match. It is new shoes and a new teacher and a chance to begin again. Even if your children are grown and gone, the first day of school still has that hint of promise: remembering the scent of freshly sharpened pencils, seeing the school buses lumbering through your neighborhood.
EXPLORE
August 25, 2011
Teachers are already back in the classrooms. A new school is about to open on Red Pump Road at the north end of Bel Air. And across the river in Cecil County, where classes were supposed to have started Wednesday, there's already been an official day off, not for snow, but for the earthquake. Sharpen those pencils, fire up those computers and start the countdown to Christmas Vacation: For most kids in Harford County, school starts Monday.  For students, it's a clean slate, with each class holding the possibility of a good grade — provided the work is done.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2011
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge ruled Monday that a Federal Hill magic bar will be allowed to keep its live entertainment license, despite objections from the 300-member neighborhood association. The Federal Hill Neighborhood Association challenged Illusions Magic Bar & Lounge's live entertainment license, which was granted by the city in June, claiming that residents' lives have been disrupted by the noise, parking and crime from Illusions and other nearby bars and clubs. Ken Horsman, who owns Illusions with his son, Spencer, applied for the license last year under the city's new live-entertainment zoning rules in order to host vaudeville-style acts, such as jugglers and comedians, he said.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2003
At first glance, the building at the end of the new road outside Westminster looks like any modern school. Architects included plenty of windows in the design. Brand-new computers abound in its classrooms. Kids jockey for position along a stainless steel lunch counter that serves up such school cafeteria standards as chicken nuggets, crinkle-cut fries and Jell-O. The differences are subtle. Classroom windows are placed high in the wall, allowing natural light to flood in but preventing easily distracted students from gazing out. There are plastic forks and spoons - but no knives - in this cafeteria.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2011
Oh Teddy. This season has been a bit of a rough ride. Particularly with your prediction for last week's Steeler's match. Ouch. But this is another week. We start with a clean slate and high hopes. Don't forget -- there is ice cream for needy dogs riding on these picks. If Teddy the Pigskin Picking Pup ends the season with a winning record (or probably, at least close to one) the folks over at Frosty Paws promised to throw an ice cream party for the needy pups at Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter.
NEWS
By James Drew and James Drew,Sun reporter | July 7, 2008
Thousands of Marylanders have had their arrest records removed from public view because of a new state law that requires automatic expungement for those who are detained and released without charge. Proponents say the nine-month-old law is working as intended, removing potential barriers to obtaining employment, housing and loans. Another major change in state expungement law takes effect Oct. 1, when some criminal convictions in Maryland can be wiped out without a pardon from the governor.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2007
The NFL revised its personal conduct policy earlier this month to dictate tougher penalties, less tolerance and a swifter response to aberrant behavior. But when it comes to player procurement, the NFL has another policy. It's called the second chance. A number of college players with rap sheets were beneficiaries of that unofficial policy over the weekend, along with one celebrated wide receiver who has achieved everything in pro football except winning a Super Bowl. Randy Moss, who bumped into a traffic cop with his car in Minneapolis, admitted smoking marijuana and confessed that he takes plays off in a game, turned a new page in his nine-year NFL career yesterday when the Oakland Raiders traded him to the New England Patriots for a fourth-round draft pick.
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