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NEWS
November 13, 1992
Representatives of the state Department of the Environment's Air Management Administration spoke to the Carroll County Chamber of Commerce yesterday about the likely effect of Clean Air Act amendments on small businesses.Although the regulations don't go into effect until 1995, state officials are required by Congress to create a Small Business Technical and Environmental Compliance AssistanceProgram to help businesses meet the act's requirements.The plan for this program must be submitted to the federal Environmental Protection Agency by Nov. 15.Business owners may call the office now for information about complying with regulations that pertain to them.
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NEWS
February 25, 2014
It came as no surprise to hear that certain U.S. Supreme Court justices hold misgivings about the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulating greenhouse gas emissions from power plants - and potentially other stationary sources. In arguments before the court Monday, it was apparent that even some of the liberal justices have doubts about how far the EPA's statutory authority can be pushed in this regard. But one thing was also clear, at least if one can draw conclusions based on the questions presented to the lawyers arguing Utility Air Regulatory Group v. EPA: A majority of the court appears content to let stand its 2007 ruling in Massachusetts v. EPA that held that the agency can consider carbon dioxide a pollutant despite its ubiquity.
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NEWS
May 20, 1992
Pity the "environmental president." His White House has just argued itself into a position it knows is indefensible. Now the question is how to get back to a reasonable stance without looking like a complete crowd of obfuscators and back-waddlers.In 1988, Candidate George Bush, fresh from his visit to putrid Boston Harbor, pledged to clean up the environment and undercut Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis' chances of overtaking him in the presidential race. Among other things, Mr. Bush promised to remove the congressional logjam on Clean Air Act revisions.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | December 9, 2013
Maryland joined seven other Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states Monday in asking for federal help to curb air pollution from outside their borders, saying emissions from the Midwest and South are hurting their residents' health and their economies. The eight states petitioned the Environmental Protection Agency to require nine "upwind" states - Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, North Caroline, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia - to join an interstate commission that over the past two decades has yielded ozone pollution reductions in Maryland and other Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states.
NEWS
By Robert T. Stafford and Leon G. Billings | November 4, 1998
FIFTY years ago, a dense mixture of fog and smoke settled over Donora, Pa., a gritty steel mill town of 12,300 people situated on the Monongahela River, 28 miles south of Pittsburgh.When rains and wind cleared away the smog five days later, 17 people had died. Four others who had become ill during the pollution siege died within two months. A government study later concluded that 5,910 persons -- nearly half the population -- had been made ill by the smog.Writers described the Donora incident as the Hiroshima of air pollution -- a disaster that first brought smog to national attention.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 11, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Prospects for completing a long-sought revision of the Clean Air Act this year rose yesterday when a congressional conference committee broke a logjam and agreed new proposals to enforce tougher auto emission standards and cleaner-burning fuels.Congressional staff members were cautiously optimistic that the breakthrough would speed resolution of the remaining issues. But it seemed no one was willing to predict whether the committee would succeed in finishing the clean air package by Oct. 19, when Congress is scheduled to recess, or whether the conference would decide to return in November to complete its work.
NEWS
By Phillip Davis | October 29, 1990
Remember the vapor-recovery gas pump nozzle -- environmentally elegant but awkward to use, and ultimately axed by the General Assembly?Thanks to the Clean Air Act, which passed both House and Senate over the weekend, the accordion-like nozzles are coming to Maryland after years of debate about them -- along with a myriad of other anti-pollution devices and regulations.But environmentalists caution that it will be years before many of the federal act's provisions begin to take effect. Even if President Bush signs the bill as expected this week, most changes will not occur before 1992.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and By David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 23, 2001
In a boon for the energy industry and a setback for environmentalists, the Bush administration is expected to announce soon that it is weakening portions of the Clean Air Act, allowing coal-burning power plants to bypass some anti-pollution rules. President Bush has argued that some Clean Air Act rules stifle energy output and do little to protect the environment. That stance has angered environmentalists, but it was mostly forgotten after Sept. 11. Now, riding high on wartime approval ratings, Bush is revisiting some of his more hotly disputed proposals, including the idea of easing some environmental regulations.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 1, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency issued its final rule yesterday to relax a central requirement of the Clean Air Act, and was promptly sued by nine states, including Maryland, that say the change would amount to government approval for Southern and Midwestern plants to pollute their air. "This action by the Bush administration is a betrayal of the right of Americans to breathe clean, healthy air," said Eliot Spitzer, attorney general of...
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1996
A Washington-based environmental group has threatened to go to court to force smog reductions in the Baltimore area, where controversy over motor vehicle emissions tests has slowed efforts to improve summer air quality.The Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund, saying the smog cleanup nationwide has stalled, notified the Environmental Protection Agency Tuesday that it would sue the federal agency in 60 days for failing to enforce the federal Clean Air Act in the Baltimore, Washington and Philadelphia metropolitan areas.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 6, 2013
Reducing air pollution has given an unexpectedly big boost to long-running efforts to clean up the Chesapeake Bay, a new study finds. Resarchers at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science determined that nitrogen pollution in nine mostly forested rivers and streams in the Appalachian reaches of the bay watershed has declined in tandem with government-mandated air pollution reductions for power plants and motor vehicles....
NEWS
By John Racanelli | April 22, 2013
For over 40 years, Earth Day has sent a powerful message: that each of us has both the capacity and the duty to support the environment that sustains us. This is certainly a message that dedicated conservationists can get behind, but what about everyday people with busy lives, kids to raise and jobs to keep? For many, Earth Day has become a day of celebration rather than an urgent call to join a movement. Earth Day Network, the organization behind Earth Day, cites the impressive statistic that 1 billion people participate in Earth Day activities each year, making it the largest civic observance in the world.
NEWS
June 27, 2012
Tuesday's victory by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in federal appeals court in the District of Columbia has once again demonstrated that the science of climate change, while famously "inconvenient," is virtually impossible for fair and reasonable people to deny. In upholding the agency's right to regulate the emission of greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide, under a handful of cases, the three-judge panel recognized climate change as the legitimate threat to public health and safety that it is, and that the Clean Air Act gives the agency appropriate authority to regulate it. This shouldn't have come as much surprise to opponents, as the decision is in line with the Supreme Court's 2007 decision affirming the EPA had that power.
NEWS
September 12, 2011
I couldn't agree more with Rena Steinzor's commentary on air pollution ("Breathing uneasily," Sept. 8). President Obama's decision to reject his own Environmental Protection Agency's recommendation to strengthen air quality standards for ozone is a bad decision for anyone with lung and/orheart disease. Major ground-level ozone sources are motor vehicles, fossil fuel-driven power plants and other industrial sites. If President Obama is not responding to the public health needs of the millions of heart and lung disease sufferers who are affected by ozone pollution, it must be because he is only listening to the cries of the corporate CEOs of the above industries.
NEWS
By Rena Steinzor | September 7, 2011
In a decision that outraged public health experts and environmentalists Friday, President Barack Obama announced that he had directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency not to do anything further to lower smog in the air until 2013 - after he has been reelected (or so he hopes). EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson was about to tighten controls, which are at this moment significantly less protective even than what the Bush administration thought acceptable. But President Obama, apparently anxious to placate relentless critics at the American Petroleum Institute and the Chamber of Commerce, told Ms. Jackson to back off. The business groups could hardly contain their glee, disingenuously describing the president's decision as an "enormous victory for America's job creators.
NEWS
By Parris N. Glendening | December 1, 2009
The Chesapeake Bay may be a beloved resource, but we have cruelly mistreated the object of our affections. After many years of knowing how urgently we must protect it, the bay is still far from the clean, vital, vibrant watershed it should be. Its poor health reflects a failure by all of us over decades. By relying on a "voluntary" approach in our cleanup efforts, we are nowhere near the goals that were set to restore this national treasure, and nowhere near a healthy bay. It is time for people to demand that their elected representatives act to do something about a dying bay and a region fraught with polluted and degraded streams and rivers.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2003
Baltimore joined a dozen states and 19 environmental groups yesterday in a lawsuit accusing the Environmental Protection Agency of poorly enforcing the Clean Air Act. The action, filed in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, seeks an order requiring the EPA to tighten standards for carbon dioxide emissions from cars, trucks, power plants and other industries. EPA officials announced Aug. 28 that they lacked authority to regulate carbon dioxide emissions under the Clean Air Act. But environmental groups said yesterday that the EPA is ducking its responsibility to control a major cause of global warming.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 31, 2000
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to consider a plea to curtail the government's authority to require industries to clean up the nation's air - just one week after agreeing to hear a request to broaden that power. Both sides of the Environmental Protection Agency's authority to enforce the Clean Air Act will be decided in the court term that starts in October. The court said it would hear the two appeals in back-to-back hearings. The court gave no explanation for widening its review of the Clean Air Act, but it appeared that the justices wanted to explore that complex law from end to end. In the past, the court had refused four times to clarify the key parts of the law. Then, last week, it voted to hear an EPA appeal.
NEWS
November 11, 2009
W hen proposed environmental regulations draw criticism from polluters as too tough and from advocates as not tough enough, it's possible the proverbial "sweet spot" of middle ground has been hit. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's latest plans for the Chesapeake Bay cleanup may be a work in progress, but clearly a measure of progress is involved. That the Chesapeake Bay could use some tough love is not in dispute. Water quality has suffered terribly as the watershed's population has grown.
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