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Clayton Mitchell

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NEWS
February 24, 1992
Hand it to veteran lobbyist James J. Doyle Jr., perhaps the only paid persuader in town who can use Maryland's budget problems as a reason to kill a bill that would raise more money for the state.The bill would create a $1 million investment adviser guaranty fund to help pay victims of securities fraud. It would do so by imposing an annual $50 assessment on every registered investment adviser; the assessment could rise if the payout from the fund increases.Here was one of the arguments that Mr. Doyle, who represents IDS Financial Services, used against the bill before the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee last week:"In a year like this, when the legislature doesn't know how to handle, or what to do with the taxes it does have, or how to raise new ones, this is the worst time to be considering an experiment like this."
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NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | November 21, 1993
Poor Clay Mitchell. Even on the day he suddenly announced his resignation from the second-most powerful post in Annapolis, he couldn't grab the headlines. He was aced out by the announcement of Maryland's $117 million unpaid bill to Blue Cross.That's the way it seemed to go for the Eastern Shoreman. He never felt he got the respect he deserved during seven years as speaker of the House of Delegates. Only his problems made the headlines. His successes were barely noted.Mr. Mitchell has a thinner skin than most politicians.
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NEWS
By THE ANNPOLIS BUREAU STAFF | February 24, 1992
The House of Delegates can be an unruly bunch.It's not uncommon for many of the 141 delegates to be talking privately to one another while a colleague has the floor.Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr. often has to whack his gavel hard to quiet the group down. So hard, in fact, that he has been known to break a gavel or two.Last week the clerks who sit in front of him decided to take precautions against gavel shrapnel. Three donned neon-colored headgear -- possibly inspired by the week's hottest item, a mandatory helmet law for motorcyclists?
NEWS
November 16, 1993
Yesterday's unexpected resignation of House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell -- apparently for personal reasons -- removes from the State House scene a much-needed stabilizing force at the highest levels of Maryland government. The battle over succession -- especially the behind-the-scenes maneuvering that is sure to follow -- could leave the House of Delegates in turmoil for the coming General Assembly session.Even if House leaders are able to reach agreement on a caretaker speaker for the 90-day meeting that starts in January, the jockeying for position will be hot and heavy as delegates shore up support in preparation for the post-election balloting for speaker late next year.
NEWS
November 10, 1990
Tuesday's election results brought about a major coup for two-party politics in Anne Arundel County. Republican Robert R. Neall slid past Democratic rival Theodore Sophocleus in the race for the county's top job. Voters ended 8 years of Democratic control and elected not one but two Republicans to the seven-member county council.The GOP's strength in Anne Arundel sprang from the shaky economy and voter frustration with rising tax bills. Mr. Neall, a man of many talents, tapped into this vein of discontent, running on his pledge to manage the county through tough times.
NEWS
December 11, 1991
Round No. 6 of Maryland's emergency budget-cutting drama brought howls of anguish yesterday from county executives and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke. And for good reason. Taking another $143 million out of local aid -- after earlier reductions of $230 million -- will force substantial reductions in county and city social programs. More layoffs seem inevitable.Can this painful step be avoided? Only if state legislators resign themselves to raising taxes. That isn't likely, given the adamant refusal of House leaders -- especially Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell -- even to consider a sizable tax increase.
NEWS
By From The Evening Sun's legislative bureau | April 8, 1991
The Assembly's antics: mallet as gavel, 'bald caucus'Amid all the serious stuff, the General Assembly has its moments of merriment.At one point last week, while House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr., D-Eastern Shore, was trying to gavel the delegates to order with a croquet mallet -- his regular gavel was cracked -- Del. Timothy F. Maloney, D-Prince George's, walked across the chamber floor, his hand in his coat pocket squeezing one of those electronic "executive...
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun Ann LoLordo and C. Fraser Smith of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | December 6, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr., D-Kent, complained yesterday that he has been under investigation by the state's special prosecutor for nine months without knowing what he is accused of or when the probe might end.As a result, the 54-year-old Eastern Shore lawmaker said, his family "has lived through nine months of sheer hell" and he has been unfairly subjected to "trial in the press."But Stephen Montanarelli, the state prosecutor, said it is Mr. Mitchell who is discussing his case in the news media.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | November 21, 1993
Poor Clay Mitchell. Even on the day he suddenly announced his resignation from the second-most powerful post in Annapolis, he couldn't grab the headlines. He was aced out by the announcement of Maryland's $117 million unpaid bill to Blue Cross.That's the way it seemed to go for the Eastern Shoreman. He never felt he got the respect he deserved during seven years as speaker of the House of Delegates. Only his problems made the headlines. His successes were barely noted.Mr. Mitchell has a thinner skin than most politicians.
NEWS
By Bruce L. Bortz | December 17, 1992
WHEREVER you went Tuesday in Maryland -- jury assembl rooms, fast-food eateries, bus stops, office lobbies -- people were gabbing not about the keno controversy, nor America's heart-warming Somali rescue mission, nor Bill Clinton's economic summit, but about Maryland Del. Nancy K. Kopp's failed attempt to oust Del. R. Clayton Mitchell as speaker of the House of Delegates.Just kidding, of course. Most Marylanders couldn't tell Clayton Mitchell, the delegate from Kent County, from Clayton Moore, the actor who played the Lone Ranger in the long-running television series.
NEWS
By Bruce L. Bortz | December 17, 1992
WHEREVER you went Tuesday in Maryland -- jury assembl rooms, fast-food eateries, bus stops, office lobbies -- people were gabbing not about the keno controversy, nor America's heart-warming Somali rescue mission, nor Bill Clinton's economic summit, but about Maryland Del. Nancy K. Kopp's failed attempt to oust Del. R. Clayton Mitchell as speaker of the House of Delegates.Just kidding, of course. Most Marylanders couldn't tell Clayton Mitchell, the delegate from Kent County, from Clayton Moore, the actor who played the Lone Ranger in the long-running television series.
NEWS
February 24, 1992
Hand it to veteran lobbyist James J. Doyle Jr., perhaps the only paid persuader in town who can use Maryland's budget problems as a reason to kill a bill that would raise more money for the state.The bill would create a $1 million investment adviser guaranty fund to help pay victims of securities fraud. It would do so by imposing an annual $50 assessment on every registered investment adviser; the assessment could rise if the payout from the fund increases.Here was one of the arguments that Mr. Doyle, who represents IDS Financial Services, used against the bill before the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee last week:"In a year like this, when the legislature doesn't know how to handle, or what to do with the taxes it does have, or how to raise new ones, this is the worst time to be considering an experiment like this."
NEWS
By THE ANNPOLIS BUREAU STAFF | February 24, 1992
The House of Delegates can be an unruly bunch.It's not uncommon for many of the 141 delegates to be talking privately to one another while a colleague has the floor.Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr. often has to whack his gavel hard to quiet the group down. So hard, in fact, that he has been known to break a gavel or two.Last week the clerks who sit in front of him decided to take precautions against gavel shrapnel. Three donned neon-colored headgear -- possibly inspired by the week's hottest item, a mandatory helmet law for motorcyclists?
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 12, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- When a teen-aged Clayton Mitchell pitched for the local baseball team, he was known more for his control than his speed.Decades later, he's still known for his control, only this time he exercises it over his fellow legislators.As speaker of the Maryland House of Delegates, 55-year-old R. ** Clayton Mitchell Jr. still plays hardball.The one-time gentleman farmer has positioned himself as The Force To Be Reckoned With in the struggle to resolve the state's budget crisis.A reserved man whose fiscal conservatism runs as deep as his Eastern Shore roots, Mr. Mitchell is the one vote needed to get a significant tax package through the legislature this winter, friends and adversaries say.That's not because the Kent County Democrat needs to break a tie in the 141-member House.
NEWS
December 11, 1991
Round No. 6 of Maryland's emergency budget-cutting drama brought howls of anguish yesterday from county executives and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke. And for good reason. Taking another $143 million out of local aid -- after earlier reductions of $230 million -- will force substantial reductions in county and city social programs. More layoffs seem inevitable.Can this painful step be avoided? Only if state legislators resign themselves to raising taxes. That isn't likely, given the adamant refusal of House leaders -- especially Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell -- even to consider a sizable tax increase.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 3, 1991
The governor is said to be saddened. A kind of death rattle is heard across the land, a shudder of community fear: If 1,766 state jobs have been cut, if $450 million must be found, then how safe is anyone?The governor is said to be depressed. He has always prided himself on being a ''people person'' and not a bottom-line guy. But this week's 1,766 job eliminations include exactly no one from William Donald Schaefer's swollen personal staff of 119 people.The governor is said to be sobered.
NEWS
November 16, 1993
Yesterday's unexpected resignation of House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell -- apparently for personal reasons -- removes from the State House scene a much-needed stabilizing force at the highest levels of Maryland government. The battle over succession -- especially the behind-the-scenes maneuvering that is sure to follow -- could leave the House of Delegates in turmoil for the coming General Assembly session.Even if House leaders are able to reach agreement on a caretaker speaker for the 90-day meeting that starts in January, the jockeying for position will be hot and heavy as delegates shore up support in preparation for the post-election balloting for speaker late next year.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 12, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- When a teen-aged Clayton Mitchell pitched for the local baseball team, he was known more for his control than his speed.Decades later, he's still known for his control, only this time he exercises it over his fellow legislators.As speaker of the Maryland House of Delegates, 55-year-old R. ** Clayton Mitchell Jr. still plays hardball.The one-time gentleman farmer has positioned himself as The Force To Be Reckoned With in the struggle to resolve the state's budget crisis.A reserved man whose fiscal conservatism runs as deep as his Eastern Shore roots, Mr. Mitchell is the one vote needed to get a significant tax package through the legislature this winter, friends and adversaries say.That's not because the Kent County Democrat needs to break a tie in the 141-member House.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR and BARRY RASCOVAR,Barry Rascovar is deputy editor of the editorial pages of The Sun | May 26, 1991
Now that the state's fiscal shelves have been stripped of all edible goods, will elected leaders get serious about preparing the fields so Annapolis can weather its next revenue drought?So far, everyone in Annapolis has studiously avoided the basiproblem: Maryland's appetite for spending far outstrips its revenue.This led to a cumulative $660 million shortfall this fiscal year, ana projected shortage of $150 million next year. Someone has seriously miscalculated.Both the governor and legislators are to blame.
NEWS
By From The Evening Sun's legislative bureau | April 8, 1991
The Assembly's antics: mallet as gavel, 'bald caucus'Amid all the serious stuff, the General Assembly has its moments of merriment.At one point last week, while House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr., D-Eastern Shore, was trying to gavel the delegates to order with a croquet mallet -- his regular gavel was cracked -- Del. Timothy F. Maloney, D-Prince George's, walked across the chamber floor, his hand in his coat pocket squeezing one of those electronic "executive...
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