Advertisement
HomeCollectionsClaudius
IN THE NEWS

Claudius

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 11, 2002
Claudius Rogers Hall Jr., who practiced law in Westminster for many years, died of pneumonia Thursday at University of Virginia hospital in Charlottesville. He was 78 and formerly resided in New Windsor. Born and raised in Eldersburg, Mr. Hall was a graduate of Sykesville High School. He earned his bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland, and his law degree from the University of Baltimore. He served in the Marine Corps in the Pacific during World War II. Mr. Hall, who maintained a general law practice for years, started his career in the 1950s in Baltimore.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Are we in the midst of a mini-Shakespeare festival? The area is currently enjoying two innovative productions of works by the Bard: Compass Rose Theater's "Romeo and Juliet" — reviewed here last week — and Annapolis Shakespeare Company's "Hamlet," now playing at Bowie Playhouse. Director Sally Boyett boldly delves into the psyche of Hamlet to accomplish a nearly impossible feat: bringing suspense to this much-told tale of the melancholy Danish prince. Boyett places the character in the 21st century, confronting the mystery of his father's death and his anguish over his mother's hasty marriage to Claudius, the king's brother and Hamlet's uncle.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2001
Having previously diagnosed historical figures ranging from Edgar Allan Poe to Beethoven, medical sleuths yesterday took up the case of a Roman emperor who was done in by his wife's lust for power. Students of history and literature know that Claudius, who died in A.D. 54, was murdered by his wife who served up a meal of poisonous mushrooms. Yesterday, Dr. William A. Valente of the University of Maryland School of Medicine said the emperor must have eaten mushrooms that contained muscarine - a deadly toxin that attacks the nervous system.
NEWS
February 7, 2008
On February 3, 2008, AARON SANDERS, Jr., loving husband of Dolores Sanders. Hes also survived by his loving children, Sharon Jackson-Hall, Lawrence and Steven Jackson; sister, Annie Williams, Theresa Sanders, Shirley Clark and brother, Claudius Sanders, eleven grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Friday after 9 A.M., where family will receive friends from 5 to 7 P.M. Family will also receive friends on Saturday in Whitestone Baptist Church, 3001 Baker Street at 11 A.M., follow by funeral service at 11:30 A.M.
NEWS
February 7, 2008
On February 3, 2008, AARON SANDERS, Jr., loving husband of Dolores Sanders. Hes also survived by his loving children, Sharon Jackson-Hall, Lawrence and Steven Jackson; sister, Annie Williams, Theresa Sanders, Shirley Clark and brother, Claudius Sanders, eleven grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Friday after 9 A.M., where family will receive friends from 5 to 7 P.M. Family will also receive friends on Saturday in Whitestone Baptist Church, 3001 Baker Street at 11 A.M., follow by funeral service at 11:30 A.M.
NEWS
November 27, 1991
The family of the late Rev. Bert Benz was the recipient of more than$5,000 from the Lutheran Brotherhood Carroll County Branch 8521 at arecent church service.At the Nov. 3 annual meeting of the countybranch, President Claudius Elmore announced that more than $3,600 had been raised locally for the Benz family. The Lutheran Brotherhood added another $1,500.In the past year, the brotherhood has dispersed almost $17,000 tovarious local projects such as Disaster Relief, Friends in Deed, Care and Share, and the Branch Challenge Fund.
NEWS
November 9, 1992
Brotherhood celebrates 10th anniversaryThe Carroll County Branch No. 8521 of the Lutheran Brotherhood recently celebrated its 10th anniversary at a dinner at the Union Bridge Fire Hall.Claudius Elmore, president, announced that the Lutheran Brotherhood through Care & Share, Friends in Deed and Disaster Relief had given more than $6,200 to local families in need of food and clothing, and to organizations. A check for $6,200 was presented to Carroll County agencies that work with the developmentally challenged.
NEWS
By Michael Alvear | February 14, 2001
ATLANTA -- It's Valentine's Day, the annual rite of cringing for the single and dateless. This year none of my single girlfriends will get asked February's famous question, "Wilt thou be mine?" There will be no asking, but there will be a lot of wilting. Nothing can make you feel more like Love's orphan than that winged, pudgy brat with the bow and arrow. Some of my friends get around the annual cringefest by sending cards to friends and family, but I don't. I refuse to participate in the dumbing down of Love.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | November 24, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Shakespeare based "Hamlet" on a bloody contemporary revenge play, out of which he forged one of the most complex character studies in all of literature.However, as directed by Michael Kahn at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre, lead actor Tom Hulce tones down much of the complexity and sacrifices some of the play's depth.This is not to say the production as a whole -- or even Hulce's performance -- lacks polish. To the contrary, it gleams. And, some of the choices exhibit stunning freshness, particularly Franchelle Stewart Dorn's interpretation of Hamlet's mother, Gertrude, as an innocent pawn who hastens her own death after she's convinced of the evil deeds of her scheming second husband, Claudius.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 6, 2000
Most adults who have gone to school in an English-speaking country have read Shakespeare's "Hamlet." Many remember entire speeches -- "to be or not to be" -- and the play's capacity to raise profound but almost everyday questions of judgment, courage, integrity and ethics. It's a nasty tale: Prince Hamlet is visited by his father's ghost -- which embodies history as fact and morality as a nag. The ghost relates that he was murdered by his brother, Claudius, now his successor both as king of Denmark and as husband to Gertrude, young Hamlet's mother.
NEWS
By WILLIAM HYDER and WILLIAM HYDER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 2006
Mist covers the stage, and a solitary seated figure declaims his misery. Thus begins a powerful production of Shakespeare's Hamlet, directed by Kasi Campbell for Rep Stage. Hamlet's speech, in Act II, is in grim harmony with the rough, dark walls of the set. An open grave yawns in the center of a bare playing area, a symbol of the death that has caused Hamlet's grief and an omen of the many deaths to come. Hamlet is in mourning for his late father, the king of Denmark. He is scandalized by the fact that less than two months after the burial, his mother, Queen Gertrude, has married the king's brother, Claudius, who is now on the throne.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2003
Edward A. Chance, a civil rights activist who helped lead the historic 1963 demonstrations that culminated in the integration of Gwynn Oak Amusement Park, died of cardiac arrest Thursday at his Catonsville home. He was 70. Mr. Chance was born and raised in Parmele, N.C., the son of William Claudius Chance Sr., an educator who established a school for black children, and Julia Johnson Chance, a teacher. "They set the precedent for the things that my father later became active in," said his daughter, Julia A. Chance of Brooklyn, N.Y. In 1948, his father was arrested and dragged off a southbound Atlantic Coast Line Railroad passenger train at Washington's Union Station for refusing to move to a segregated "Jim Crow" coach.
NEWS
September 11, 2002
Claudius Rogers Hall Jr., who practiced law in Westminster for many years, died of pneumonia Thursday at University of Virginia hospital in Charlottesville. He was 78 and formerly resided in New Windsor. Born and raised in Eldersburg, Mr. Hall was a graduate of Sykesville High School. He earned his bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland, and his law degree from the University of Baltimore. He served in the Marine Corps in the Pacific during World War II. Mr. Hall, who maintained a general law practice for years, started his career in the 1950s in Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | April 14, 2002
Fans of the Robert Graves novel I, Claudius, so brilliantly dramatized for TV years ago, will have an automatic entry point into Opera Vivente's next production -- Handel's Agrippina. Fans of another fun old TV series, Dynasty, should have an even easier time. Composed around 1709, at the end of Handel's three-year stay in Italy, the opera caused something of a sensation when it was premiered in Venice. Both the plot and the music were just what the public there craved -- lots of humor and irony to spice up the tale of how Agrippina, wife of Claudius, connives to get her son Nero onto the throne of Rome, lots of florid arias and colorful orchestration to provide aural delight.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2002
He ruled Judea with grandeur, building palaces, fortresses, aqueducts, entire new cities and the Mediterranean's best harbor. On the downside, he was a famous despot who killed his favorite wife, three of his children and assorted rivals. These facts are known about Herod, the Roman Empire's client-king who ruled for 34 years until his death in 4 B.C. Historians are less sure about this: What caused his horrible, painful death? Since June, Dr. Jan V. Hirschmann of the University of Washington in Seattle has been pondering the question, poring over an intriguing list of symptoms that included itching, fever, intestinal pain, swollen feet, depression, convulsions and gangrene in a most uncomfortable place.
NEWS
By Michael Alvear | February 14, 2001
ATLANTA -- It's Valentine's Day, the annual rite of cringing for the single and dateless. This year none of my single girlfriends will get asked February's famous question, "Wilt thou be mine?" There will be no asking, but there will be a lot of wilting. Nothing can make you feel more like Love's orphan than that winged, pudgy brat with the bow and arrow. Some of my friends get around the annual cringefest by sending cards to friends and family, but I don't. I refuse to participate in the dumbing down of Love.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | April 14, 2002
Fans of the Robert Graves novel I, Claudius, so brilliantly dramatized for TV years ago, will have an automatic entry point into Opera Vivente's next production -- Handel's Agrippina. Fans of another fun old TV series, Dynasty, should have an even easier time. Composed around 1709, at the end of Handel's three-year stay in Italy, the opera caused something of a sensation when it was premiered in Venice. Both the plot and the music were just what the public there craved -- lots of humor and irony to spice up the tale of how Agrippina, wife of Claudius, connives to get her son Nero onto the throne of Rome, lots of florid arias and colorful orchestration to provide aural delight.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | July 5, 1994
In celebration of its 10th anniversary, Shakespeare on Wheels has mounted the most famous, most produced play by Shakespeare -- or, for that matter, by any playwright -- "Hamlet."And, under Sam McCready's direction, this traveling troupe of the University of Maryland Baltimore County has come up with a credible, if much abridged, production.Although it is almost never performed uncut, the full-length "Hamlet" runs approximately five hours. McCready's version comes closer to two-and-a-quarter hours (including intermission)
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2001
Having previously diagnosed historical figures ranging from Edgar Allan Poe to Beethoven, medical sleuths yesterday took up the case of a Roman emperor who was done in by his wife's lust for power. Students of history and literature know that Claudius, who died in A.D. 54, was murdered by his wife who served up a meal of poisonous mushrooms. Yesterday, Dr. William A. Valente of the University of Maryland School of Medicine said the emperor must have eaten mushrooms that contained muscarine - a deadly toxin that attacks the nervous system.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 6, 2000
Most adults who have gone to school in an English-speaking country have read Shakespeare's "Hamlet." Many remember entire speeches -- "to be or not to be" -- and the play's capacity to raise profound but almost everyday questions of judgment, courage, integrity and ethics. It's a nasty tale: Prince Hamlet is visited by his father's ghost -- which embodies history as fact and morality as a nag. The ghost relates that he was murdered by his brother, Claudius, now his successor both as king of Denmark and as husband to Gertrude, young Hamlet's mother.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.