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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | October 9, 1994
Revenge, lust and great music in 'Rigoletto'Verdi's "Rigoletto" is one of the high-water marks of the operatic genre: tuneful, full of sentiment and structured so that it drives to its tragic conclusion with the force of a river rushing to a precipice. This classic tale of lust and revenge opens the Baltimore Opera Company's current season at the Lyric Opera House with performances Oct. 15 (8:15 p.m.), Oct. 19 (7:30 p.m.), Oct. 21 (8:15 p.m.) Oct. 22 (8:15 p.m.) and Oct. 23 (3 p.m.). The cast for the Oct. 15, Oct. 19, Oct. 21 and Oct. 23 performances will feature Mark Rucker as Rigoletto, Jane Thorngren as Gilda and Stuart Neill as the Duke.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | March 23, 2006
They should move you, no matter who you are. The documentary, drama and action movies featured in the William and Irene Weinberg Family Baltimore Jewish Film Festival are filled with political, social and cultural issues. Organizers hope the eight films will captivate and resonate with audiences of all backgrounds and ages. "That's almost the mission of the film festival: To really bring people together, but people from everywhere -- not just Jewish people," said Claudine Davison, the assistant director for arts and culture at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | September 19, 1993
More than 20 local theater companies ranging from avant-garde ensembles to dinner-theater musical troupes will help Center Stage launch its new season with a free theatrical block party from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. today.Theater Streetfest '93 will offer backstage tours, live music, discounted tickets and theater activities for children in the Center Stage building as well as on the 700 block of North Calvert Street. The festival also gives theater fans a chance to buy theatrical props and costumes.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | March 17, 2004
The William and Irene Weinberg Family Jewish Film Festival opens its 16th season at 7:30 p.m. April 1 with the Baltimore premiere of Taking Sides, Iszvan Szabo's film of Ronald Harwood's play about conductor Wilhelm Furtwangler (Stellan Skarsgard) and the U.S. Army prosecutor (Harvey Keitel) who interrogates him about his work in Germany under the Nazis. Murry Sidlin, the dean of music at Catholic University, will be the guest speaker on April 1; artist Jay Wolf Schlossberg-Cohen will dissect the movie when it screens again at 3 p.m. April 4. April 3 brings Kinky Friedman: Proud to Be an [Expletive]
NEWS
March 21, 2007
Aubrey Franklin Haynes, Sr., M.D., J.D., F.A.C.S., 85, of 1017 Oak Hill Ave., Hagerstown, Maryland died March 19, 2007 at Washington County Hospital. Born June 19, 1921, in Murfreesboro, Tennessee he was the son of the late Aubrey and Bertha Haynes. He attended Middle Tennessee State University and Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa., and pre-med at Johns Hopkins University; he graduated from George Washington University Medical School in 1949. He served his internship and general surgical residency at Marine Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | November 9, 1990
THE FRENCH COMPOSER Berlioz was a Romantic, but not your shrinking violet kind. He sent his youthful, early "Eight Scenes of Faust" to Goethe, the creator of the great German poem and his inspiration. The attempt to curry favor with the aging master poet failed. A friend advised Goethe the Berlioz score was "a fragment of an abortion resulting from a hideous incest." The correspondence was doomed. Berlioz shelved the project.But not for good. Seventeen years later in 1846 a more experienced Berlioz used fragments and new material for "The Damnation of Faust," called it a "dramatic legend" but not an opera, and after a bad start sailed off with a masterpiece of Romantic flourish.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,Sun Staff | November 21, 2004
The Stone That the Builder Refused by Madison Smartt Bell. Pantheon. 750 pages. $29.95. With the first two volumes of his ambitious Haitian trilogy, Madison Smartt Bell invited readers on a demanding literary journey: more than 1,000 pages of dense history, tangled plots and a colossal cast of characters. Now, with the publication of The Stone that the Builder Refused -- the trilogy's third volume -- Bell asks readers to embark on the final and most formidable stretch of this journey: a 750-page account of the last two years in the life of Toussaint L'Ouverture, hero of Haiti's slave rebellion.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | March 29, 1991
THE FIVE Heartbeats'' is an initially clumsy film, one that disarms as it moves along. By the time it is ended, you are glad to have known these people.''The Five Heartbeats'' was co-authored by Robert Townsend and Keenen Ivory Wayans (''In Living Color'') and was directed by Townsend, whose previous (and only) film was the 1987 ''Hollywood Shuffle.''''Shuffle'' was a collection of comedy sketches. ''The Five Heartbeats'' is something quite different. There are some laughs (with these two doing the script, this is inevitable)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 2003
WASHINGTON - President Bush, in a brief private ceremony yesterday in the Oval Office, signed into law legislation allowing the creation of a National Museum of African-American History and Culture as part of the Smithsonian Institution. The signing caps a turbulent, nearly century-long quest for such a museum and represents a significant victory for the legislators, business and civic leaders, artists and veterans who have championed the project over several generations. Despite a lack of fanfare and no public statement from Bush, backers of the museum said the atmosphere surrounding the event was heavy with emotion and historic significance.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | September 26, 1994
The current exhibit of contemporary Russian art at the Jewish Community Center is a great disappointment, and one needs a little background on this failure.Alexandre Gertsman, a recent immigrant from Russia, has formed a foundation to promote the works of contemporary artists from the former Soviet Union. He curated a challenging exhibit last January at Baltimore's Evergreen House, and another of his exhibits, called "Meaning as a Second Language: A Contemporary Russian Initiative," debuted this summer at the Jewish Community Center of West Hartford, Conn.
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