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Claudine

NEWS
February 20, 2009
Why waste money sustaining killers? In economic times like these, why would any government want to repeal the death penalty ("Deciding death penalty," Feb. 17)? I'm fairly certain that those who commit crimes worthy of capital punishment know that they may be put to death if they commit the crime. So why should citizens of Maryland pay to keep people with no regard for human life alive in prison for perhaps 50 or 60 years? I'm also very certain that our governor could make better use of his time than by trying to rally support to protect the rights of murderers while the people of Maryland are losing their houses and jobs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | March 23, 2006
They should move you, no matter who you are. The documentary, drama and action movies featured in the William and Irene Weinberg Family Baltimore Jewish Film Festival are filled with political, social and cultural issues. Organizers hope the eight films will captivate and resonate with audiences of all backgrounds and ages. "That's almost the mission of the film festival: To really bring people together, but people from everywhere -- not just Jewish people," said Claudine Davison, the assistant director for arts and culture at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | September 19, 1993
More than 20 local theater companies ranging from avant-garde ensembles to dinner-theater musical troupes will help Center Stage launch its new season with a free theatrical block party from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. today.Theater Streetfest '93 will offer backstage tours, live music, discounted tickets and theater activities for children in the Center Stage building as well as on the 700 block of North Calvert Street. The festival also gives theater fans a chance to buy theatrical props and costumes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Muncie and By John Muncie,Special to the Sun | September 8, 2002
Families are always fertile ground for novelists. With a little digging, even an average family turns out to be as filled with intrigue as the Borgias. Topping this early fall list are three books about families that are spectacularly beyond average. Caramelo (Knopf, 448 pages, $24) is a sprawling, raucous affair that weaves together several generations of la familia Reyes. This is Sandra Cisneros' first novel since 1985's The House on Mango Street. That book, told from a young Mexican-American girl's viewpoint, was elegant and simple.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | June 1, 2003
Centro de la Comunidad The lilt of Latin music, and goldfish bowls on dinner tables set a bubbly tone for the evening inside the American Visionary Art Museum's sculpture barn. Welcome to "Fiesta Latina 2003," the annual fund-raiser for Baltimore's Latino community center, Centro de la Comunidad. More than 200 guests browsed a buffet of paella, carved tenderloin and grilled chicken, and sampled drinks from a martini bar. They needed a little fortification before getting down to the tough business of negotiating the silent auction tables or taking to the dance floor.
FEATURES
By Debra Warner and Debra Warner,Orange County Register | October 30, 1993
For years, old Halloween candy containers, cards and decorations were the wallflowers of holiday collectibles.That tacky orange and black just didn't go over; neither did those goofy pumpkins and cackling witches.Collectors snapped up antique Valentines, with their elegant rose and lace motifs, or old Christmas decorations, with shining tinsel and smiling St. Nicks.Even Labor Day postcards stirred more interest than Halloween cards, because of their scarcity.But, in recent years, prices for old Halloween souvenirs have soared higher than the Wicked Witch on her broomstick; prices are up 30 percent this year, and Halloween is now the holiday, collectors say."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel | July 11, 2011
"Sorry. " -- Eric Northman I think it's important to list the most frightening things about this crazy, muddled installment of "True Blood. " Ready? In descending order: 5. A child-like Eric killing Sookie's fairy godmother (apparently when this happens to fairies they turn into melting Nazi soldiers a la "Raiders of the Lost Ark"). Although it was hilarious when Sookie told him to stop and all he did was grin and say "Sorry. " 4. Marnie going all crazy cult-leader and pleading ("Pleeease")
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 2003
WASHINGTON - President Bush, in a brief private ceremony yesterday in the Oval Office, signed into law legislation allowing the creation of a National Museum of African-American History and Culture as part of the Smithsonian Institution. The signing caps a turbulent, nearly century-long quest for such a museum and represents a significant victory for the legislators, business and civic leaders, artists and veterans who have championed the project over several generations. Despite a lack of fanfare and no public statement from Bush, backers of the museum said the atmosphere surrounding the event was heavy with emotion and historic significance.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | September 26, 1994
The current exhibit of contemporary Russian art at the Jewish Community Center is a great disappointment, and one needs a little background on this failure.Alexandre Gertsman, a recent immigrant from Russia, has formed a foundation to promote the works of contemporary artists from the former Soviet Union. He curated a challenging exhibit last January at Baltimore's Evergreen House, and another of his exhibits, called "Meaning as a Second Language: A Contemporary Russian Initiative," debuted this summer at the Jewish Community Center of West Hartford, Conn.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 14, 2004
There is something wrong with a society that can't allow itself to just enjoy the simple pleasures of a Christmas TV special without analyzing the experience to death. Have we become so media-critical and deconstructionist that there's no place for a little Rudolph joy in our post-postmodern hearts? That's what I was thinking as I sat down with Bravo's The Christmas Special Christmas Special, a one-hour look at the history of Christmas television shows. The special, hosted by Carson Kressley (Queer Eye for the Straight Guy)
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