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Claudine

NEWS
February 20, 2009
Why waste money sustaining killers? In economic times like these, why would any government want to repeal the death penalty ("Deciding death penalty," Feb. 17)? I'm fairly certain that those who commit crimes worthy of capital punishment know that they may be put to death if they commit the crime. So why should citizens of Maryland pay to keep people with no regard for human life alive in prison for perhaps 50 or 60 years? I'm also very certain that our governor could make better use of his time than by trying to rally support to protect the rights of murderers while the people of Maryland are losing their houses and jobs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | March 23, 2006
They should move you, no matter who you are. The documentary, drama and action movies featured in the William and Irene Weinberg Family Baltimore Jewish Film Festival are filled with political, social and cultural issues. Organizers hope the eight films will captivate and resonate with audiences of all backgrounds and ages. "That's almost the mission of the film festival: To really bring people together, but people from everywhere -- not just Jewish people," said Claudine Davison, the assistant director for arts and culture at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Muncie and By John Muncie,Special to the Sun | September 8, 2002
Families are always fertile ground for novelists. With a little digging, even an average family turns out to be as filled with intrigue as the Borgias. Topping this early fall list are three books about families that are spectacularly beyond average. Caramelo (Knopf, 448 pages, $24) is a sprawling, raucous affair that weaves together several generations of la familia Reyes. This is Sandra Cisneros' first novel since 1985's The House on Mango Street. That book, told from a young Mexican-American girl's viewpoint, was elegant and simple.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | September 19, 1993
More than 20 local theater companies ranging from avant-garde ensembles to dinner-theater musical troupes will help Center Stage launch its new season with a free theatrical block party from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. today.Theater Streetfest '93 will offer backstage tours, live music, discounted tickets and theater activities for children in the Center Stage building as well as on the 700 block of North Calvert Street. The festival also gives theater fans a chance to buy theatrical props and costumes.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
The Talent Machine Company's summer production of Cole Porter's "Can Can," showcasing its 14- to 18-year-old cast members, ran two weekends, Aug. 5 to 14, at St. John's College Key Auditorium. As in past TMC summer shows, this event could be compared to a major talent competition and graduation ceremony for exceptional teens who have become disciplined, polished professionals. Developing raw talent is a Talent Machine tradition dating back to the company's founding in 1987 by Bobbi Smith.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | July 1, 1992
The hand-written note from first-grader Christy Case summed up students' sentiments pretty well:"Dear, Mrs. Whitmore. I do not want a new prinsuble. You are sweet a nuf. Please stay here. Love Christy."Despite pleas from young admirers that she stay, "Prinsuble" Lauralee F. Whitmore said she knew it was time to move on. After eight years at Richard Henry Lee Elementary School and 38 years in education, Whitmore retired effective yesterday."The students made hearts and brought in flowers and did lots of things to show how much they'd miss her," said Claudine Dunning, a veteran secretary at the school, who worked with Whitmore since her arrival.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 14, 2004
There is something wrong with a society that can't allow itself to just enjoy the simple pleasures of a Christmas TV special without analyzing the experience to death. Have we become so media-critical and deconstructionist that there's no place for a little Rudolph joy in our post-postmodern hearts? That's what I was thinking as I sat down with Bravo's The Christmas Special Christmas Special, a one-hour look at the history of Christmas television shows. The special, hosted by Carson Kressley (Queer Eye for the Straight Guy)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,Sun Staff | November 21, 2004
The Stone That the Builder Refused by Madison Smartt Bell. Pantheon. 750 pages. $29.95. With the first two volumes of his ambitious Haitian trilogy, Madison Smartt Bell invited readers on a demanding literary journey: more than 1,000 pages of dense history, tangled plots and a colossal cast of characters. Now, with the publication of The Stone that the Builder Refused -- the trilogy's third volume -- Bell asks readers to embark on the final and most formidable stretch of this journey: a 750-page account of the last two years in the life of Toussaint L'Ouverture, hero of Haiti's slave rebellion.
BUSINESS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2000
Somebody get drkoop.com a doctor. Shares of the popular online consumer medical site founded by former U.S. Surgeon General Dr. C. Everett Koop plummeted more than 40 percent yesterday after auditors said they had "substantial doubt" about the future health of the business. Shares of drkoop.com fell $2.5625, or 41 percent, to close at $3.6875 at the close of the Nasdaq yesterday. The company went public in June and traded as high intraday as $45.75. The Austin, Texas-based company is the third most popular health care site on the Internet, with 2.8 million first-time visitors in February, according to Media Matrix.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | March 29, 1991
THE FIVE Heartbeats'' is an initially clumsy film, one that disarms as it moves along. By the time it is ended, you are glad to have known these people.''The Five Heartbeats'' was co-authored by Robert Townsend and Keenen Ivory Wayans (''In Living Color'') and was directed by Townsend, whose previous (and only) film was the 1987 ''Hollywood Shuffle.''''Shuffle'' was a collection of comedy sketches. ''The Five Heartbeats'' is something quite different. There are some laughs (with these two doing the script, this is inevitable)
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