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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | October 9, 1994
Revenge, lust and great music in 'Rigoletto'Verdi's "Rigoletto" is one of the high-water marks of the operatic genre: tuneful, full of sentiment and structured so that it drives to its tragic conclusion with the force of a river rushing to a precipice. This classic tale of lust and revenge opens the Baltimore Opera Company's current season at the Lyric Opera House with performances Oct. 15 (8:15 p.m.), Oct. 19 (7:30 p.m.), Oct. 21 (8:15 p.m.) Oct. 22 (8:15 p.m.) and Oct. 23 (3 p.m.). The cast for the Oct. 15, Oct. 19, Oct. 21 and Oct. 23 performances will feature Mark Rucker as Rigoletto, Jane Thorngren as Gilda and Stuart Neill as the Duke.
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FEATURES
By Karin Remesch | September 20, 1998
Mission: To educate the Jewish and general public by presenting high-quality fine-arts exhibits of Jewish interest, either by Jewish artists or with a meaningful Jewish component - all in keeping with the overall mission of the Jewish Community Center, of which the gallery is a part. The gallery schedules five to six shows annually, with original works in all media by artists from the United States and around the world.Latest accomplishment: The current exhibit, "Park Heights: Lives Along an Avenue," opened Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | March 23, 2006
They should move you, no matter who you are. The documentary, drama and action movies featured in the William and Irene Weinberg Family Baltimore Jewish Film Festival are filled with political, social and cultural issues. Organizers hope the eight films will captivate and resonate with audiences of all backgrounds and ages. "That's almost the mission of the film festival: To really bring people together, but people from everywhere -- not just Jewish people," said Claudine Davison, the assistant director for arts and culture at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | September 19, 1993
More than 20 local theater companies ranging from avant-garde ensembles to dinner-theater musical troupes will help Center Stage launch its new season with a free theatrical block party from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. today.Theater Streetfest '93 will offer backstage tours, live music, discounted tickets and theater activities for children in the Center Stage building as well as on the 700 block of North Calvert Street. The festival also gives theater fans a chance to buy theatrical props and costumes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Muncie and By John Muncie,Special to the Sun | September 8, 2002
Families are always fertile ground for novelists. With a little digging, even an average family turns out to be as filled with intrigue as the Borgias. Topping this early fall list are three books about families that are spectacularly beyond average. Caramelo (Knopf, 448 pages, $24) is a sprawling, raucous affair that weaves together several generations of la familia Reyes. This is Sandra Cisneros' first novel since 1985's The House on Mango Street. That book, told from a young Mexican-American girl's viewpoint, was elegant and simple.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 8, 1993
The feud among members of the Haft family over the control of their holdings in the Dart Group could well be a plot for the kinds of books Robert M. Haft promotes in television and newspapers advertisements for Crown Books, one of Dart's companies.Mr. Haft, 40, founded the Crown Books chain in 1977 and made it the nation's third-largest bookseller after Waldenbooks and Barnes & Noble, with reported sales of about $241 million. He was expected soon to succeed his 72-year-old father, Herbert H. Haft, as chairman and chief executive of the Dart Group.
NEWS
March 21, 2007
Aubrey Franklin Haynes, Sr., M.D., J.D., F.A.C.S., 85, of 1017 Oak Hill Ave., Hagerstown, Maryland died March 19, 2007 at Washington County Hospital. Born June 19, 1921, in Murfreesboro, Tennessee he was the son of the late Aubrey and Bertha Haynes. He attended Middle Tennessee State University and Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa., and pre-med at Johns Hopkins University; he graduated from George Washington University Medical School in 1949. He served his internship and general surgical residency at Marine Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,Sun Staff | November 21, 2004
The Stone That the Builder Refused by Madison Smartt Bell. Pantheon. 750 pages. $29.95. With the first two volumes of his ambitious Haitian trilogy, Madison Smartt Bell invited readers on a demanding literary journey: more than 1,000 pages of dense history, tangled plots and a colossal cast of characters. Now, with the publication of The Stone that the Builder Refused -- the trilogy's third volume -- Bell asks readers to embark on the final and most formidable stretch of this journey: a 750-page account of the last two years in the life of Toussaint L'Ouverture, hero of Haiti's slave rebellion.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | March 17, 2004
The William and Irene Weinberg Family Jewish Film Festival opens its 16th season at 7:30 p.m. April 1 with the Baltimore premiere of Taking Sides, Iszvan Szabo's film of Ronald Harwood's play about conductor Wilhelm Furtwangler (Stellan Skarsgard) and the U.S. Army prosecutor (Harvey Keitel) who interrogates him about his work in Germany under the Nazis. Murry Sidlin, the dean of music at Catholic University, will be the guest speaker on April 1; artist Jay Wolf Schlossberg-Cohen will dissect the movie when it screens again at 3 p.m. April 4. April 3 brings Kinky Friedman: Proud to Be an [Expletive]
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 2003
WASHINGTON - President Bush, in a brief private ceremony yesterday in the Oval Office, signed into law legislation allowing the creation of a National Museum of African-American History and Culture as part of the Smithsonian Institution. The signing caps a turbulent, nearly century-long quest for such a museum and represents a significant victory for the legislators, business and civic leaders, artists and veterans who have championed the project over several generations. Despite a lack of fanfare and no public statement from Bush, backers of the museum said the atmosphere surrounding the event was heavy with emotion and historic significance.
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